How to take photos through binoculars

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by dr_phill123@yahoo.com, May 9, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I have a good quality digital camera and binoculars. But when I
    manually hold the camera behind the binoculars, the pictures never
    come out sharp. Is there some trick to getting the pictures sharp like
    when you look directly through the binoculars. I have played with all
    the focusing on the binoculars to no avail.
     
    , May 9, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Bob Williams Guest

    wrote:
    > I have a good quality digital camera and binoculars. But when I
    > manually hold the camera behind the binoculars, the pictures never
    > come out sharp. Is there some trick to getting the pictures sharp like
    > when you look directly through the binoculars. I have played with all
    > the focusing on the binoculars to no avail.
    >

    If you are trying to hand-hold the camera, you can probably expect some
    fuzziness. If yor binoculars are say 7X power and your camera has a a
    140mm (equivalent) lens, you are shooting at the equivalent of using a
    980 mm lens!!!! You will probably need a good tripod to hold the
    binoculars still and some type of jig to hold the camera still.
    There is a lot of interest in this type of photography.
    Try Googling on "Digiscoping".
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, May 9, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On May 9, 3:21 am, Bob Williams <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I have a good quality digital camera and binoculars. But when I
    > > manually hold the camera behind the binoculars, the pictures never
    > > come out sharp. Is there some trick to getting the pictures sharp like
    > > when you look directly through the binoculars. I have played with all
    > > the focusing on the binoculars to no avail.

    >
    > If you are trying to hand-hold the camera, you can probably expect some
    > fuzziness. If yor binoculars are say 7X power and your camera has a a
    > 140mm (equivalent) lens, you are shooting at the equivalent of using a
    > 980 mm lens!!!! You will probably need a good tripod to hold the
    > binoculars still and some type of jig to hold the camera still.
    > There is a lot of interest in this type of photography.
    > Try Googling on "Digiscoping".
    > Bob Williams



    Additionally, the binoculars lower the effective f/# of the optics.
    This is known as an afocal attachment and the f/number of the
    binoculars ends up being your effective f/#. The result is a slow
    shutter speed, which coupled with the high magnification makes motion
    blur inevitable. One must mount both camera and binoculars on a
    tripod.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, May 9, 2007
    #3
  4. Garry Knight Guest

    Bob Williams wrote:

    > Try Googling on "Digiscoping".


    I tried this with a compact and a monocular a few weeks ago and felt that I
    didn't really know what I was doing. I still don't, but at least now I know
    what it's called... :)

    --
    Garry Knight
     
    Garry Knight, May 9, 2007
    #4
  5. TheBreeze Guest

    "Bob Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:rwf0i.281698$...
    >
    > wrote:
    > > I have a good quality digital camera and binoculars. But when I
    > > manually hold the camera behind the binoculars, the pictures never
    > > come out sharp. Is there some trick to getting the pictures sharp like
    > > when you look directly through the binoculars. I have played with all
    > > the focusing on the binoculars to no avail.
    > >

    > If you are trying to hand-hold the camera, you can probably expect some
    > fuzziness. If yor binoculars are say 7X power and your camera has a a
    > 140mm (equivalent) lens, you are shooting at the equivalent of using a
    > 980 mm lens!!!! You will probably need a good tripod to hold the
    > binoculars still and some type of jig to hold the camera still.


    The old rule of thumb on 35mm film cameras was that the shutter speed needed
    to be at least as fast as the reciprocal of the focal length to avoid seeing
    camera shake. That's for a photographer trying to hold very still (no
    tripod, but standing still holding his/her breath). So, for a 135 mm
    telephoto lens, you'd want to be at most 1/125 sec. 7x binoculars would be
    like a 350 mm telephoto. That doesn't even include the extra light lost due
    to the "extra" optics.
     
    TheBreeze, May 10, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Shiperton Henethe
    Replies:
    88
    Views:
    5,478
    Shiperton Henethe
    Sep 4, 2003
  2. Shiperton Henethe
    Replies:
    37
    Views:
    8,076
    Shiperton Henethe
    Aug 18, 2003
  3. WP20032
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    413
    WP20032
    Aug 19, 2003
  4. Sal

    Moon through binoculars

    Sal, Dec 5, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,516
    Mark Thomas
    Dec 5, 2008
  5. Nomen Nescio

    When someone can't take good photos they try to take control

    Nomen Nescio, Mar 4, 2009, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    389
    Nomen Nescio
    Mar 4, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page