How to stop Outlook sending a large file?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Caught, Oct 4, 2010.

  1. Caught

    Caught Guest

    I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems to be
    just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.

    Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    appreciated - thanks
    Caught, Oct 4, 2010
    #1
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  2. Caught

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <i8dm8f$j27$>, says...
    >
    > I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems to be
    > just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >
    > Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    > appreciated - thanks


    On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version), click "Work
    Offline").

    Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the Outbox.

    Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook back
    online again :)

    --
    Duncan.
    Dave Doe, Oct 5, 2010
    #2
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  3. Caught

    Caught Guest

    "Dave Doe" <> wrote in message
    news:-september.org...
    > In article <i8dm8f$j27$>, says...
    >>
    >> I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems to
    >> be
    >> just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >>
    >> Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    >> appreciated - thanks

    >
    > On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version), click "Work
    > Offline").
    >
    > Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the Outbox.
    >
    > Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook back
    > online again :)
    >
    > --
    > Duncan.
    >


    Duncan

    It worked successfully - many, mant thanks
    Caught, Oct 5, 2010
    #3
  4. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:07:46 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:

    > In article <i8dm8f$j27$>, says...
    >>
    >> I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems to
    >> be just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >>
    >> Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    >> appreciated - thanks

    >
    > On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version), click "Work
    > Offline").
    >
    > Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the Outbox.
    >
    > Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook back
    > online again :)


    Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    default?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 5, 2010
    #4
  5. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:11:11 +1300, EMB wrote:

    >> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    >> default?

    >
    > Why shouldn't it?


    Why should it!

    Email is a plain text protocol.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 5, 2010
    #5
  6. Caught

    Enkidu Guest

    On 05/10/10 21:16, Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:11:11 +1300, EMB wrote:
    >
    >>> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    >>> default?

    >>
    >> Why shouldn't it?

    >
    > Why should it!
    >
    > Email is a plain text protocol.
    >

    *Was* a plain text protocol.

    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1341

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Oct 5, 2010
    #6
  7. Caught

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:11:11 +1300, EMB wrote:
    >
    > >> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    > >> default?

    > >
    > > Why shouldn't it?

    >
    > Why should it!
    >
    > Email is a plain text protocol.


    Because whether you or I like it or not, is it what joe blogs home or
    office uses to send stuff.

    On work environments, I enforce a 10Mb Exchange Server max email size
    policy. And I remove any limit to users email accounts sizes - and
    monitor via reporting (in some cases daily), and charge the client for
    my time to do that.

    Personally, I'd love to be more draconian - but in real-life, it's they
    way that I've found it has to be.

    Most of these users couldn't spell "dropbox" (or use the MS equivalent -
    or any other file sharing means or method, including other protocols
    such as FTP (which they've never heard of anyway)).

    Office users even use email to send files to fuken each other! - it
    drives me nuts. I even gave up on the proverbial G: drive long ago
    (years). (In case you are too young to know what the "office" G: drive
    is - it's a domain user read/write share that is "controlled" by a
    script or batch file that deletes "files older than 7 days" - or
    whatever. Any domain user can drop or get files to or from it).

    It doesn't get easier than a G: drive share - but for most offices, it
    just doesn't work. They just don't use it - no matter how easy.

    User education? - it falls on deaf ears. The only folk that can
    effectively use a LAN based network environment are the clued up office
    girls (and they often don't need it).

    You can try teaching the office managers and bosses (the ones that need
    to know it) - and of course charge them for your time. They don't like
    it, and they don't like being charged for it either. Back to email! :)

    (It's not "back to email" - it's what they keep doing, and have been).

    That said - the more "techie" the business, the better chance you have -
    any other business, good fuken luck!

    In short, get real and bite the bullet.

    --
    Duncan.
    Dave Doe, Oct 5, 2010
    #7
  8. Caught

    Richard Guest

    On 5/10/2010 6:41 p.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:07:46 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:
    >
    >> In article<i8dm8f$j27$>, says...
    >>>
    >>> I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems to
    >>> be just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    >>> appreciated - thanks

    >>
    >> On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version), click "Work
    >> Offline").
    >>
    >> Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the Outbox.
    >>
    >> Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook back
    >> online again :)

    >
    > Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    > default?


    Why would they limit it to such a small amount by default?
    Richard, Oct 5, 2010
    #8
  9. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 22:13:08 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:

    > Office users even use email to send files to fuken each other! - it
    > drives me nuts. I even gave up on the proverbial G: drive long ago
    > (years). (In case you are too young to know what the "office" G: drive
    > is - it's a domain user read/write share that is "controlled" by a
    > script or batch file that deletes "files older than 7 days" - or
    > whatever. Any domain user can drop or get files to or from it).


    We don't have that - we just have admins periodically sending email spam
    to everyone asking them to remove unnecessary stuff.

    Our clients have S: drives which include a "Common" directory in which
    anyone can put anything (except multimedia stuff) anywhere. Stuff older
    than 1 calendar month is cleared out once a month.

    It appears to be well used - but so is the email system.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 5, 2010
    #9
  10. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:45:23 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    > On 05/10/10 21:16, Sweetpea wrote:
    >> On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:11:11 +1300, EMB wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    >>>> default?
    >>>
    >>> Why shouldn't it?

    >>
    >> Why should it!
    >>
    >> Email is a plain text protocol.
    >>

    > *Was* a plain text protocol.
    >
    > http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1341
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    It still is a plain text protocol. All emails are sent in clear text, and
    binaries sent via email are encoded as plain text.

    It is still possible to open up a telnet session to the relevant port on
    your email server and type in an email (just don't make any mistakes).


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 5, 2010
    #10
  11. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 22:39:32 +1300, Richard wrote:

    > On 5/10/2010 6:41 p.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    >> On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:07:46 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article<i8dm8f$j27$>,
    >>> says...
    >>>>
    >>>> I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck. It seems
    >>>> to be just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be greatly
    >>>> appreciated - thanks
    >>>
    >>> On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version), click
    >>> "Work Offline").
    >>>
    >>> Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the Outbox.
    >>>
    >>> Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook back
    >>> online again :)

    >>
    >> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    >> default?

    >
    > Why would they limit it to such a small amount by default?


    Why would they use email to send large binaries? Other protocols are more
    appropriate for transferring binaries over the Internet.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 5, 2010
    #11
  12. Caught

    Richard Guest

    On 6/10/2010 12:21 a.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    >
    > Why would they use email to send large binaries? Other protocols are more
    > appropriate for transferring binaries over the Internet.


    Because it is quick and easy to send a file that small via email in most
    cases except with stoneage sysadmins still stuck in the 1990s with
    mailbox and message size limits.
    Richard, Oct 5, 2010
    #12
  13. Caught

    Enkidu Guest

    On 06/10/10 00:21, Sweetpea wrote:
    > On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 22:39:32 +1300, Richard wrote:
    >
    >> On 5/10/2010 6:41 p.m., Sweetpea wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 13:07:46 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In article<i8dm8f$j27$>,
    >>>> says...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've tried to stop and delete this large file with no luck.
    >>>>> It seems to be just 'sitting there' with nothing happening.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any suggestion on how to stop and delete this file would be
    >>>>> greatly appreciated - thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> On the Outlook File menu (you don't mention which version),
    >>>> click "Work Offline").
    >>>>
    >>>> Close and restart Outlook. Now you can delete the item in the
    >>>> Outbox.
    >>>>
    >>>> Don't forget to use the File, Work Online option to get Outlook
    >>>> back online again :)
    >>>
    >>> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs
    >>> by default?

    >>
    >> Why would they limit it to such a small amount by default?

    >
    > Why would they use email to send large binaries? Other protocols are
    > more appropriate for transferring binaries over the Internet.
    >

    Some people don't know of any other way and refuse to learn one.

    Say you wanted to send some pictures to Granny. Granny has email but
    wouldn't have a clue about FTP. Each picture of her beloved grandkids
    might weigh in at 2 - 3 MB. Even if they were reduced in size 20 such
    pictures could bust the limit.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Oct 5, 2010
    #13
  14. In article <4caae5a3$>, Enkidu <> wrote:
    >On 05/10/10 21:16, Sweetpea wrote:
    >> On Tue, 05 Oct 2010 21:11:11 +1300, EMB wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Why does MS Outlook permit sending emails larger than 5 or 8megs by
    >>>> default?
    >>>
    >>> Why shouldn't it?

    >>
    >> Why should it!
    >>
    >> Email is a plain text protocol.
    >>

    >*Was* a plain text protocol.
    >
    >http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1341


    Oh that is depressing. :)

    Still should be text only I reckon ... and that would take care of 97 % of
    spam as well ? :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Oct 5, 2010
    #14
  15. In article <4cab8870$>, Enkidu <> wrote:
    (snip)
    >> Why would they use email to send large binaries? Other protocols are
    >> more appropriate for transferring binaries over the Internet.
    >>

    >Some people don't know of any other way and refuse to learn one.
    >
    >Say you wanted to send some pictures to Granny. Granny has email but
    >wouldn't have a clue about FTP. Each picture of her beloved grandkids
    >might weigh in at 2 - 3 MB. Even if they were reduced in size 20 such
    >pictures could bust the limit.


    ... and it *should*. When I used kmail, one of its most useful features was
    a size filter (something like 'reject everything over 50 kB' worked really
    well. I reckon all email systems should have those filters. :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Oct 5, 2010
    #15
  16. In article <>, Allistar <> wrote:
    (snip)
    >8Mb is not "large". Not these days. And it's not a binary being emailed -
    >the email app converts the binary to 7 or 8bit quoted ASCII.


    Wrong. Particularly for those of us that still have dial up (why would you
    pay for broadband that isn't ?).

    And even if it's not large, it's still wrong. Who has been sent a picture of
    words when all you wanted was the words themselves ? <puts up hand>
    People being stupid is not a reason to change good standards IMO. :)
    Bruce Sinclair, Oct 5, 2010
    #16
  17. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 09:20:00 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    > Say you wanted to send some pictures to Granny. Granny has email but
    > wouldn't have a clue about FTP. Each picture of her beloved grandkids
    > might weigh in at 2 - 3 MB. Even if they were reduced in size 20 such
    > pictures could bust the limit.


    Granny wouldn't know what to do with a 3mb image. She'd find it way
    bigger than her 800*600 monitor.

    Much better to send images more suited for viewing on a monitor - and
    they can be 100-150mb in size and still have plenty of detail.

    That makes 3mb - assuming you're sending large web-viewable versions and
    assuming that you're sending such a large number of photos.

    Most people doing that would be using gmail or hotmail and I'm not
    convinced that those websites will permit attaching that many individual
    binaries.

    If they really want to send 60mb of photos to Granny then they can burn a
    CD and post it.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 6, 2010
    #17
  18. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 09:51:06 +1300, Allistar wrote:

    >> Why would they use email to send large binaries? Other protocols are
    >> more appropriate for transferring binaries over the Internet.

    >
    > 8Mb is not "large". Not these days. And it's not a binary being emailed
    > - the email app converts the binary to 7 or 8bit quoted ASCII.


    It *IS* a binary being emailed. But you're correct about it having to be
    converted into a format that can be sent as plain text.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 6, 2010
    #18
  19. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 12:22:58 +1300, Allistar wrote:

    > Bruce Sinclair wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>, Allistar
    >> <> wrote: (snip)
    >>>8Mb is not "large". Not these days. And it's not a binary being emailed
    >>>- the email app converts the binary to 7 or 8bit quoted ASCII.

    >>
    >> Wrong. Particularly for those of us that still have dial up (why would
    >> you pay for broadband that isn't ?).
    >>
    >> And even if it's not large, it's still wrong. Who has been sent a
    >> picture of words when all you wanted was the words themselves ? <puts
    >> up hand>

    >
    > Worse is people sending a snapshot of a notepad document and embedded
    > that snapshot into a MS Word document. Argghhh!
    >
    >> People being stupid is not a reason to change good standards IMO. :)

    >
    > Not all cases of sending >8Mb emails is down to stupidity.


    I think it is - the stupidity of the admin who poorly configured their
    server to accept such hideously large emails.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 6, 2010
    #19
  20. Caught

    Sweetpea Guest

    On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 14:45:36 +1300, Allistar wrote:

    >> I think it is - the stupidity of the admin who poorly configured their
    >> server to accept such hideously large emails.

    >
    > It's a matter of opinion whether 8Mb is hideously large.


    Answer this then: Given that email is a plain text communications
    protocol How many plain text characters make up an email containing an
    8mb attachment!


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Sweetpea, Oct 6, 2010
    #20
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