How to share a wireless network with 2 routers or switches

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Polaris431, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. Polaris431

    Polaris431 Guest

    Hi,

    I live in a large house. I have a DSL connection that comes into a
    room on the floor where I live. The router is a Fritz!Box WLAN. People
    on the floor above me share my Internet connection by using the WLAN
    connectivity of the router. Unfortunately, the house is so large that
    the Wi-Fi signal is only adequate for the floor directly above me. I
    want to avoid installing cable. My idea is that I would install a
    wireless router or switch on the floor above me. The signal strength
    would then be strong enough to cover the floor above. I have a few
    problems though in understanding how this will work. First, my router
    acts as an Access Point and currently the users on the floor above me
    use wireless adapters to connect to it. Now if I install a wireless
    router or switch, it isn't clear how they connect to my Internet
    connection. I am not sure if I need a wireless router or just a
    wireless switch (if such a thing even exists). I do understand that
    some wireless routers can be setup to act as a switch. Regardless
    whether it's a switch or router, it probably needs to be configured to
    connect to my wireless network and route traffic to those who connect
    to it. What does the IP address and Gatway need to be set to on the
    router/switch? Do the user's PCs need to have fixed IP addresses or
    are they retrieved from the wireless router on their floor or from my
    router? I'd appreciate it very much if someone can clearly indicate
    what steps I need to take to get the floor above me to share my
    Internet connection using an additional router or switch. There are
    not that many users on the floor above me (about 4 or 5 users).

    Thank you.
    Johann
     
    Polaris431, Feb 15, 2009
    #1
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  2. Polaris431

    Polaris431 Guest

    Sorry for the double post. Google indicate that the original post was
    "old" immediately after posting and it didn't show up as "new" until a
    few minutes later. Seems to be a bug in the way Google Groups handles
    new postings. I did a little more research about routers, switches and
    APs. It seems that a wireless AP device would probably do the job.
    Would the TP-Link TL-WA501G Wireless AP do the job? (http://www.tp-
    link.com/products/product_des.asp?id=36)
     
    Polaris431, Feb 15, 2009
    #2
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  3. Polaris431

    Lem Guest

    Polaris431 wrote:
    > Sorry for the double post. Google indicate that the original post was
    > "old" immediately after posting and it didn't show up as "new" until a
    > few minutes later. Seems to be a bug in the way Google Groups handles
    > new postings. I did a little more research about routers, switches and
    > APs. It seems that a wireless AP device would probably do the job.
    > Would the TP-Link TL-WA501G Wireless AP do the job? (http://www.tp-
    > link.com/products/product_des.asp?id=36)


    There is no mystery about wireless networks if you realize that the
    "wireless" connection is just a substitute for a wire. What you are
    talking about is having a device (wireless AP) on the second floor that
    (a) connects to your Fritz!Box via a wireless link and (b) that allows
    users on the second floor to connect wirelessly to it.

    Although this certainly is possible, for most home-grade equipment, the
    throughput is cut in half for the users that connect wirelessly to the
    second floor AP.

    Although you want to avoid running cables, your best solution would be
    to run *one* cable from your current router (assuming that it has at
    least one available wired LAN jack in addition to its wireless
    capability) to a wireless AP on the second floor.

    MVP Jack's website has a lot of helpful info on this and similar topics.
    See particularly http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Feb 15, 2009
    #3
  4. Polaris431

    Polaris431 Guest

    > Although this certainly is possible, for most home-grade equipment, the
    > throughput is cut in half for the users that connect wirelessly to the
    > second floor AP.


    That's interesting. If the Wi-Fi transmission from my Fritz!Box is
    running at 54 Mbs and I use a repeater on the second floor, are you
    saying that those who connect to my Fritz!Box via the repeater only
    get 25 Mbs? If so, why? If the repeater can handle 54 Mbs, why would
    the end user not have the same bandwidth as if they were connecting
    directly to AP on my Fritz!Box?
     
    Polaris431, Feb 17, 2009
    #4
  5. Polaris431

    James Egan Guest

    On Mon, 16 Feb 2009 23:27:23 -0800 (PST), Polaris431
    <> wrote:

    >That's interesting. If the Wi-Fi transmission from my Fritz!Box is
    >running at 54 Mbs and I use a repeater on the second floor, are you
    >saying that those who connect to my Fritz!Box via the repeater only
    >get 25 Mbs? If so, why? If the repeater can handle 54 Mbs, why would
    >the end user not have the same bandwidth as if they were connecting
    >directly to AP on my Fritz!Box?


    It's because the upstairs repeater to which you are connected to has
    to divide its time between communicating with the upstairs wireless
    stations and the router downstairs. Normally you wouldn't notice much
    difference with Internet connections because the bottleneck is the
    throughput from router to ISP. However, if you need regular lengthy
    communication between the upstairs and downstairs PC's then you will
    be better off linking the two boxes by cable and configuring the
    upstairs box as a wireless access point.


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Feb 17, 2009
    #5
  6. Polaris431

    Lem Guest

    Polaris431 wrote:
    >> Although this certainly is possible, for most home-grade equipment, the
    >> throughput is cut in half for the users that connect wirelessly to the
    >> second floor AP.

    >
    > That's interesting. If the Wi-Fi transmission from my Fritz!Box is
    > running at 54 Mbs and I use a repeater on the second floor, are you
    > saying that those who connect to my Fritz!Box via the repeater only
    > get 25 Mbs? If so, why? If the repeater can handle 54 Mbs, why would
    > the end user not have the same bandwidth as if they were connecting
    > directly to AP on my Fritz!Box?


    In addition to James' explanation, I should also point out that under
    the best of circumstances (close range, no interference, no 802.11b
    stations involved, no wireless bridge) you will not get 54 Mbps from a
    802.11g wireless network.

    The 54 Mbps refers to the maximum raw data rate. The actual useful
    throughput is around half that, and less if there are any 802.11b
    clients. This Wikipedia article suggest a typical throughput of 19 Mbps
    for 802.11g, although I've seen estimates as high as 27 Mbps.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11#802.11g

    If the main router and the secondary router are relatively close and
    there is little interference (e.g., one is in the room directly above
    the other, there is only a standard wood floor/plasterboard ceiling
    between them, and there are no nearby sources of 2.4 GHz radio
    interference), you may, as James points out, only notice throughput
    limitations on communications within your own network, and perhaps not
    even that. Unless you have a very unusual home Internet connection, the
    bottleneck is more likely to be your DSL or cable connection.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
     
    Lem, Feb 17, 2009
    #6
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