How to set modem to 'Always on'

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by pawihte, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens C2110)
    died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    been keeping for just such a situation.

    The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and
    PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a
    few moments.

    However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to "Always
    on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically
    logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    connection is temporarily lost.

    The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a
    look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see
    if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    pawihte, Aug 17, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. pawihte

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 21:15:39 +0530, pawihte wrote:

    > When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens C2110) died, I
    > dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've been keeping for
    > just such a situation.
    >
    > The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even "Custom"
    > installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my ISP doesn't like
    > the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and PPPoA. The setup
    > installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a few moments.
    >
    > However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to "Always on"
    > mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or indeed if it can
    > be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically logged on to my ISP as
    > soon as it's turned on even if the computer is turned off, and seldom
    > needed power cycling when connection is temporarily lost.
    >
    > The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the "DSL
    > Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up during the
    > setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a look at the
    > combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see if there's
    > anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    > http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png


    The dialer is your PPPoE auth so it seems it's not built into the 906E.
    The 'keep alive' would be part of the dialer.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
    Meat Plow, Aug 17, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. pawihte

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    > When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens C2110)
    > died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    > been keeping for just such a situation.
    >
    > The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    > "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    > ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and
    > PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a
    > few moments.
    >
    > However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to "Always
    > on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    > indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically
    > logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    > computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    > connection is temporarily lost.
    >
    > The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    > "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    > during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a
    > look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see
    > if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    > http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >
    >


    Buy a router. Job done.
    Desk Rabbit, Aug 17, 2010
    #3
  4. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    Meat Plow wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 21:15:39 +0530, pawihte wrote:
    >
    >> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >> C2110)
    >> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >> been
    >> keeping for just such a situation.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >> "Custom"
    >> installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my ISP
    >> doesn't
    >> like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and PPPoA.
    >> The
    >> setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a few
    >> moments.
    >>
    >> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >> "Always on"
    >> mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or indeed
    >> if it
    >> can be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically logged on
    >> to my
    >> ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the computer is turned
    >> off,
    >> and seldom needed power cycling when connection is temporarily
    >> lost.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >> "DSL
    >> Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >> during the
    >> setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a look at
    >> the
    >> combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see if
    >> there's
    >> anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    >> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png

    >
    > The dialer is your PPPoE auth so it seems it's not built into
    > the
    > 906E. The 'keep alive' would be part of the dialer.


    So it seems. Thanks for the reply.
    pawihte, Aug 17, 2010
    #4
  5. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    Desk Rabbit wrote:
    > On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >> C2110)
    >> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    >> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE
    >> and
    >> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >> just a
    >> few moments.
    >>
    >> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >> "Always
    >> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >> automatically
    >> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >> have a
    >> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and
    >> see
    >> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >> on"?
    >> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Buy a router. Job done.


    The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.

    In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as
    does the UI, and as also did an independent review site when it
    was still a new product.
    pawihte, Aug 17, 2010
    #5
  6. pawihte

    VanguardLH Guest

    pawihte wrote:

    > When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens C2110)
    > died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    > been keeping for just such a situation.
    >
    > The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    > "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    > ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and
    > PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a
    > few moments.
    >
    > However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to "Always
    > on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    > indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically
    > logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    > computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    > connection is temporarily lost.
    >
    > The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    > "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    > during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a
    > look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see
    > if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    > http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png


    DSL works like an old-fashioned phone line. It makes a call and gets
    connected. If the session becomes idle, the session is lost (i.e., the
    modem hangs up). You may not think the DSL modem is calling each time
    you want a connection because the session should only take a partial
    second to establish. The only way to keep the session from expiring is
    to use a keep-alive function in the modem. If your modem doesn't have
    that then look in the PPPoE settings (used for DSL connects) in your
    router to see if it has a keep-alive function.

    Since the titlebars of the screenshots that you gave say "DSL router"
    then my guess is that what you are using is a combo of router and DSL
    modem (i.e., 2 devices inside the same box). You didn't show the
    General tab panel. In the other panels, nothing looked obvious to me
    for a user configurable keep-alive option for the PPPoE protocol.
    VanguardLH, Aug 17, 2010
    #6
  7. pawihte wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >>> C2110)
    >>> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >>> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >>> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    >>> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE
    >>> and
    >>> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >>> just a
    >>> few moments.
    >>>
    >>> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >>> "Always
    >>> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >>> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >>> automatically
    >>> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >>> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >>> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >>> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >>> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >>> have a
    >>> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and
    >>> see
    >>> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >>> on"?
    >>> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Buy a router. Job done.

    >
    > The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    > connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >
    > In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as
    > does the UI, and as also did an independent review site when it
    > was still a new product.
    >
    >

    Looks like there is no setting for that:
    http://www.thinkbroadband.com/hardware/reviews/28-dslw-906e.html


    --
    www.skepticalscience.com|www.youtube.com/officialpeta
    cageprisoners.com|www.snuhwolf.9f.com|www.eyeonpalin.org
    _____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
    / __/ |/ / / / / // // . . \\ \ |\ | / __ \ \ \ __\
    _\ \/ / /_/ / _ / \ / \ \| \| \ \_\ \ \__\ _\
    /___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
    §ñühw¤£f, Aug 17, 2010
    #7
  8. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    VanguardLH wrote:
    > pawihte wrote:
    >
    >> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >> C2110)
    >> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    >> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE
    >> and
    >> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >> just a
    >> few moments.
    >>
    >> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >> "Always
    >> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >> automatically
    >> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>
    >> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >> have a
    >> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and
    >> see
    >> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >> on"?
    >> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png

    >
    > DSL works like an old-fashioned phone line. It makes a call
    > and gets
    > connected. If the session becomes idle, the session is lost
    > (i.e.,
    > the modem hangs up). You may not think the DSL modem is
    > calling each
    > time you want a connection because the session should only take
    > a
    > partial second to establish. The only way to keep the session
    > from
    > expiring is to use a keep-alive function in the modem. If your
    > modem
    > doesn't have that then look in the PPPoE settings (used for DSL
    > connects) in your router to see if it has a keep-alive
    > function.
    >

    There are no settings other than the ones I've shown. I'm not
    sure I understand when you say that the modem hangs up if the
    session becomes idle. Sometimes I leave it idle for long periods
    while I do other things, come back and start browsing,
    downloading or whatever without having to redial. My assigned
    dynamic IP address remains unchanged. I do understand the concept
    of having the modem say to the server "Heads up! I've been idle
    but I'm now ready to swap data again" without having to go
    through the whole log-in process.

    What I want to do is to avoid having to open the dialer and click
    'connect' every time I'm logged out from my ISP. Sometimes my
    connection stays up for hours, but sometimes drops every few
    minutes. The loss of connection is not always immediately
    obvious.

    > Since the titlebars of the screenshots that you gave say "DSL
    > router"
    > then my guess is that what you are using is a combo of router
    > and DSL
    > modem (i.e., 2 devices inside the same box). You didn't show
    > the
    > General tab panel. In the other panels, nothing looked obvious
    > to me
    > for a user configurable keep-alive option for the PPPoE
    > protocol.


    Sorry, I should have explained why I didn't show the General tab
    panel. It's just a welcome screen with nothing except 'DSL Router
    Commander' in big letters and a brief copyright statement.
    pawihte, Aug 18, 2010
    #8
  9. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    §ñühw¤£f wrote:
    > pawihte wrote:
    >> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>>> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >>>> C2110)
    >>>> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that
    >>>> I've
    >>>> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>>>
    >>>> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >>>> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range
    >>>> (my
    >>>> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between
    >>>> PPPoE
    >>>> and
    >>>> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >>>> just a
    >>>> few moments.
    >>>>
    >>>> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >>>> "Always
    >>>> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >>>> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >>>> automatically
    >>>> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >>>> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >>>> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>>>
    >>>> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called
    >>>> the
    >>>> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called
    >>>> up
    >>>> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >>>> have a
    >>>> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings
    >>>> and
    >>>> see
    >>>> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >>>> on"?
    >>>> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Buy a router. Job done.

    >>
    >> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    >> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >>
    >> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as
    >> does the UI, and as also did an independent review site when
    >> it
    >> was still a new product.
    >>
    >>

    > Looks like there is no setting for that:
    > http://www.thinkbroadband.com/hardware/reviews/28-dslw-906e.html


    Yes, that's the review I saw and saved years ago when I bought
    the modem from a forum member.
    pawihte, Aug 18, 2010
    #9
  10. pawihte

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >>> C2110)
    >>> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >>> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >>> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    >>> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE
    >>> and
    >>> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >>> just a
    >>> few moments.
    >>>
    >>> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >>> "Always
    >>> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >>> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >>> automatically
    >>> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >>> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >>> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >>> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >>> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >>> have a
    >>> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and
    >>> see
    >>> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >>> on"?
    >>> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Buy a router. Job done.

    >
    > The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    > connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >
    > In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as


    So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!

    (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router firmware
    and most will have an always on option. If it is a modem then the
    dialling will be in software on your computer.

    A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.
    Desk Rabbit, Aug 18, 2010
    #10
  11. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    Desk Rabbit wrote:
    > On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    >> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>>> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >>>> C2110)
    >>>> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that
    >>>> I've
    >>>> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>>>
    >>>> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >>>> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range
    >>>> (my
    >>>> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between
    >>>> PPPoE
    >>>> and
    >>>> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >>>> just a
    >>>> few moments.
    >>>>
    >>>> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >>>> "Always
    >>>> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >>>> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >>>> automatically
    >>>> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >>>> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >>>> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>>>
    >>>> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called
    >>>> the
    >>>> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called
    >>>> up
    >>>> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >>>> have a
    >>>> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings
    >>>> and
    >>>> see
    >>>> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >>>> on"?
    >>>> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Buy a router. Job done.

    >>
    >> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    >> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >>
    >> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as

    >
    > So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!


    OK, point taken. But I've known many knowledgeable people (far
    more knowledgeable than I on this subject) use the two terms
    interchangeably when referring to the device as a means of
    accessing the internet. E.g., "Modem X is also a router" is an
    oft-heard (and oft-read) expression.

    >
    > (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router
    > firmware and most will have an always on option. If it is a
    > modem
    > then the dialling will be in software on your computer.
    >
    > A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.


    Well this *is* a router, but it doesn't seem to have an 'always
    on' option.
    pawihte, Aug 18, 2010
    #11
  12. pawihte

    chuckcar Guest

    "pawihte" <> wrote in
    news:i4ear5$hsk$-september.org:

    > When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens C2110)
    > died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    > been keeping for just such a situation.
    >
    > The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    > "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    > ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE and
    > PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in just a
    > few moments.
    >
    > However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to "Always
    > on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    > indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens automatically
    > logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    > computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    > connection is temporarily lost.
    >
    > The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    > "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    > during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please have a
    > look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and see
    > if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always on"?
    > http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png
    >
    >

    Have you looked at the "web" settings for the modem from your ISP.
    They are generally reached by a url very close to if not:

    http://192.168.2.1

    The simplest way of finding the right IP address if the above isn't
    it is to do a tracert. Open up a msdos window and type:

    tracert yahoo.com

    using a computer connected in some way to that modem.

    You should get something like this:

    Tracing route to yahoo.com [67.195.160.76]
    over a maximum of 30 hops:

    1 78 ms 95 ms 100 ms dsldevice.lan [192.168.1.254]
    2 57 ms 57 ms 56 ms 206.248.154.104
    3 58 ms 57 ms 60 ms 2110.ae0.bdr01.tor.packetflow.ca [69.196.136.34]
    4 56 ms 58 ms 58 ms peer1.bdr02.tor.packetflow.ca [64.34.236.121]
    5 56 ms 58 ms 55 ms 10ge.xe-2-0-0.tor-151f-cor-1.peer1.net [216.187.114.145]
    6 56 ms 57 ms 57 ms 10ge.xe-0-0-0.tor-1yg-cor-1.peer1.net [216.187.114.133]
    7 69 ms 68 ms 69 ms 10ge.xe-0-0-0.chi-eqx-dis-1.peer1.net [216.187.114.141]
    8 68 ms 68 ms 114 ms exchange-cust1.ch1.equinix.net [206.223.119.16]
    9 84 ms 85 ms 85 ms ae-0.pat1.dcp.yahoo.com [216.115.101.152]
    10 85 ms 84 ms 84 ms xe-9-0-0.msr2.ac2.yahoo.com [216.115.108.145]
    11 86 ms 86 ms 86 ms xe-5-2-0.clr4.ac4.yahoo.com [76.13.1.113]
    12 84 ms 85 ms 85 ms ge-1-0-1.clr1.ac4.yahoo.com [76.13.0.25]
    13 82 ms 83 ms 86 ms yahoo.com [67.195.160.76]

    Trace complete.

    You will notice that only *one* line above has an ip address
    beginning with 192. In my case, that is the modem. In every case
    the *last* line that does is the modem. You put *that* IP address in
    a web browser.


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Aug 18, 2010
    #12
  13. pawihte

    chuckcar Guest

    Desk Rabbit <> wrote in
    news:i4g4lp$q0a$:

    > On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    >> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:

    >>
    >> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    >> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >>
    >> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as

    >
    > So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!
    >
    > (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router
    > firmware and most will have an always on option. If it is a modem then
    > the dialling will be in software on your computer.
    >
    > A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.


    No, it *is* a modem. The fact that it has some networking hardware built
    into it doesn't change that a bit. Hmm, this conversation sounds vaguely
    familiar somehow...

    The fact is that the word modem is a compression of the two words:
    modulator demodulator. That means any device that converts digital
    signals into sinusoidal wave forms and back. An analogue modem uses an
    extended set of the tone pairs used by touch tone keypads allowing up to
    64x what the phone line will allow with a simple presence or absence of
    a single tone. That limit is slightly under 1Khz with any kind of
    reliability. Hence 56K modems.

    A digital modem does the same, but has less noise on the line as the
    line quality is much higher. They also use more tone pairs than is
    possible on a normal analogue phone line.

    *Both* do modulation and demodulation so both are modems.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Aug 18, 2010
    #13
  14. pawihte

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-08-18, pawihte <> wrote:

    [...]

    > What I want to do is to avoid having to open the dialer and click
    > 'connect' every time I'm logged out from my ISP. Sometimes my
    > connection stays up for hours, but sometimes drops every few
    > minutes. The loss of connection is not always immediately
    > obvious.


    [...]

    I'd suspect a problem with the phone line forcing your modem/router to
    drop the connection at random intervals. (That could even be what made
    you think the other modem/router was faulty).

    When you use a normal voice telephone on that line, is there a lot of
    'noise'? If you unplug everything from the phone line (including the
    modem/router and any fax machine or answering machine) is the telephone
    still 'noisy'? If not, try new DSL filter(s) - does that reduce the
    'noise' on the telephone when the modem/router is connected and the
    computer is on line?

    If the telephone is still noisy even with nothing else connected to the
    phone line, then get your phone company to test the line for faults. You
    may have to insist that they send an engineer to test from your end, as
    some faults don't show up with tests from the exchange. Make sure you
    understand what call-out charges there might be! (Where I live, the phone
    company only charge for a call-out if they find a fault on their system,
    and no faults on any of your own equipment).

    If the phone line is OK and the telephone isn't noisy, then ask your ISP
    to check their connections.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Aug 18, 2010
    #14
  15. pawihte

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    On 18/08/2010 11:22, chuckcar wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit<> wrote in
    > news:i4g4lp$q0a$:
    >
    >> On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    >>> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>>
    >>> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    >>> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >>>
    >>> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as

    >>
    >> So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!
    >>
    >> (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router
    >> firmware and most will have an always on option. If it is a modem then
    >> the dialling will be in software on your computer.
    >>
    >> A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.

    >
    > No, it *is* a modem. The fact that it has some networking hardware built
    > into it doesn't change that a bit. Hmm, this conversation sounds vaguely
    > familiar somehow...

    Good old Chuck. Clueless as ever.


    > The fact is that the word modem is a compression of the two words:
    > modulator demodulator. That means any device that converts digital
    > signals into sinusoidal wave forms and back. An analogue modem uses an
    > extended set of the tone pairs used by touch tone keypads allowing up to
    > 64x what the phone line will allow with a simple presence or absence of
    > a single tone. That limit is slightly under 1Khz with any kind of
    > reliability. Hence 56K modems.
    >
    > A digital modem does the same, but has less noise on the line as the
    > line quality is much higher. They also use more tone pairs than is
    > possible on a normal analogue phone line.
    >
    > *Both* do modulation and demodulation so both are modems.
    >


    Show me a modem that can route IP traffic. I shan't hold my breath.
    Desk Rabbit, Aug 18, 2010
    #15
  16. pawihte

    pawihte Guest

    Whiskers wrote:
    > On 2010-08-18, pawihte <> wrote:
    >
    > [...]
    >
    >> What I want to do is to avoid having to open the dialer and
    >> click
    >> 'connect' every time I'm logged out from my ISP. Sometimes my
    >> connection stays up for hours, but sometimes drops every few
    >> minutes. The loss of connection is not always immediately
    >> obvious.

    >
    > [...]
    >
    > I'd suspect a problem with the phone line forcing your
    > modem/router to
    > drop the connection at random intervals. (That could even be
    > what
    > made you think the other modem/router was faulty).
    >
    > When you use a normal voice telephone on that line, is there a
    > lot of
    > 'noise'? If you unplug everything from the phone line
    > (including the
    > modem/router and any fax machine or answering machine) is the
    > telephone still 'noisy'? If not, try new DSL filter(s) - does
    > that
    > reduce the 'noise' on the telephone when the modem/router is
    > connected and the computer is on line?
    >
    > If the telephone is still noisy even with nothing else
    > connected to
    > the phone line, then get your phone company to test the line
    > for
    > faults. You may have to insist that they send an engineer to
    > test
    > from your end, as some faults don't show up with tests from the
    > exchange. Make sure you understand what call-out charges there
    > might
    > be! (Where I live, the phone company only charge for a
    > call-out if
    > they find a fault on their system, and no faults on any of your
    > own
    > equipment).
    >
    > If the phone line is OK and the telephone isn't noisy, then ask
    > your
    > ISP to check their connections.


    I always check the phone line from time to time and it's usually
    perfectly clear. It used to be a dedicated service for internet
    access with a fixed monthly charge and no outgoing call facility.
    I've switched to a scheme they introduced some time ago. Now the
    line is rent-free as long as I subscribe to their broadband
    service. I can now also make outgoing calls but I don't have a
    phone or anything else connected to this line except when I'm
    testing it for noise. My house (also my place of work) is only
    200 meters from the exchange.

    I live in a remote corner of India and the phone company is the
    large nationwide corporation called BSNL. I know the local staff
    pretty well and they are responsive to calls, but they also have
    limited technical know-how.
    pawihte, Aug 18, 2010
    #16
  17. pawihte

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 18 Aug 2010 15:18:24 +0530, pawihte wrote:

    > OK, point taken. But I've known many knowledgeable people (far more
    > knowledgeable than I on this subject) use the two terms interchangeably
    > when referring to the device as a means of accessing the internet. E.g.,
    > "Modem X is also a router" is an oft-heard (and oft-read) expression.


    The time limit if any, would be in your dialer string. Very similar to an
    analog modem's instructions. I would expect your connection to persist
    forever barring a sync error and subsequent connection drop. You need to
    call your DSL provider and as them if your setup should provide 'always
    on' service or if the connection has a time limit or disconnects after a
    certain period of inactivity. Good luck and let the group know what you
    find out.


    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
    Meat Plow, Aug 18, 2010
    #17
  18. pawihte

    Tony Guest

    There's been some questions and confusion in a previous post in regards to
    why you "hard boot" (or "power drains" as chuck likes to call it) your DSL
    modem. I'm compiling a website for these NG's to cut down on the utter
    bullshit that's been posted in here by some posters (*caugh* chuck). So
    lets clear out the bullshit and get back to business. This took me 30 mins
    to compile and write. This is for those who wanted to know exactly why you
    turn your modem on and off, and why this works.

    Power cycling your modem or hard booting your modem, by completely
    unplugging it for about 30 - 40 seconds then turn it back on again, can fix
    some internet connection problems. Here is a more in-depth response to this

    issue as to why this is done.

    This clears out your modems buffers which can get over filled due to Packet
    Loss; and this intern can cause your modem to loose sync with the
    connection. This is the most common problem that causes loss of sync with
    your connection and power cycling your modem is used to re-sync it. However
    this is a quick fix to this problem. In most cases this can be prevented by

    having the appropriate network tweaks and settings in place, which is
    something that the tech turnips at Sympatico should be informing us on.

    Supportive Research:

    http://www.dslreports.com/speed - Explains Packet Loss and other speed
    related issues, plus links to tweaks page. For those of you who notice a
    decrease in speed during certain times of the day, might want to check out
    Enemy #3 on this page.

    http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article/0,aid,111644,pg,2,00.asp# - Excellent
    Article.

    http://cable-dsl.home.att.net/ - Listed in PC World Article

    After you have ruled out all possibly for connection problems i.e.. Routers,

    adware, viruses, browser cache etc..and if after you are still having Sync
    Problems with the tweaks you have done, visit section 5.3 : Sync Problems on

    the following site:

    http://www.docmirror.net/en/linux/howto/networking/DSL-HOWTO/tuning.html

    --
    Steve

    chuckcar wrote:

    > Desk Rabbit <> wrote in
    > news:i4g4lp$q0a$:
    >
    > > On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    > >> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    > >>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    > >>
    > >> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    > >> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    > >>
    > >> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as

    > >
    > > So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!
    > >
    > > (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router
    > > firmware and most will have an always on option. If it is a modem then
    > > the dialling will be in software on your computer.
    > >
    > > A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.

    >
    > No, it *is* a modem. The fact that it has some networking hardware built
    > into it doesn't change that a bit. Hmm, this conversation sounds vaguely
    > familiar somehow...
    >
    > The fact is that the word modem is a compression of the two words:
    > modulator demodulator. That means any device that converts digital
    > signals into sinusoidal wave forms and back. An analogue modem uses an
    > extended set of the tone pairs used by touch tone keypads allowing up to
    > 64x what the phone line will allow with a simple presence or absence of
    > a single tone. That limit is slightly under 1Khz with any kind of
    > reliability. Hence 56K modems.
    >
    > A digital modem does the same, but has less noise on the line as the
    > line quality is much higher. They also use more tone pairs than is
    > possible on a normal analogue phone line.
    >
    > *Both* do modulation and demodulation so both are modems.
    >
    > --
    > (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )


    --
    The Grandmaster of the CyberFROG

    Come get your ticket to CyberFROG city

    Nay, Art thou decideth playeth ye simpleton games. *Some* of us know proper
    manners

    Very few. I used to take calls from *rank* noobs but got fired the first day
    on the job for potty mouth,

    Hamster isn't a newsreader it's a mistake!

    El-Gonzo Jackson FROGS both me and Chuckcar

    Master Juba was a black man imitating a white man imitating a black man

    Using my technical prowess and computer abilities to answer questions beyond
    the realm of understandability

    Regards Tony... Making usenet better for everyone everyday
    Tony, Aug 18, 2010
    #18
  19. pawihte

    Anyone Guest

    pawihte wrote:
    > VanguardLH wrote:
    >> pawihte wrote:
    >>
    >>> When the ADSL modem/router supplied by my ISP (a Siemens
    >>> C2110)
    >>> died, I dug up an old modem (DSL Warehouse DSL-906E) that I've
    >>> been keeping for just such a situation.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E is very simple to set up using the wizard. Even
    >>> "Custom" installation needs only setting the VPI/VCI range (my
    >>> ISP doesn't like the default 0/38) and choosing between PPPoE
    >>> and
    >>> PPPoA. The setup installs a dialer and it's ready to go in
    >>> just a
    >>> few moments.
    >>>
    >>> However, whereas I could configure the Siemens modem to
    >>> "Always
    >>> on" mode, I don't know how to do that with the DSL-906E, or
    >>> indeed if it can be set to "Always on". The Siemens
    >>> automatically
    >>> logged on to my ISP as soon as it's turned on even if the
    >>> computer is turned off, and seldom needed power cycling when
    >>> connection is temporarily lost.
    >>>
    >>> The DSL-906E software has a configuration interface called the
    >>> "DSL Router Commander" which is installed but *not* called up
    >>> during the setup process with the wizard. Could you please
    >>> have a
    >>> look at the combined screenshot of the Commander settings and
    >>> see
    >>> if there's anything there that can be set to enable "Always
    >>> on"?
    >>> http://img840.imageshack.us/img840/9735/modemconfig.png

    >> DSL works like an old-fashioned phone line. It makes a call
    >> and gets
    >> connected. If the session becomes idle, the session is lost
    >> (i.e.,
    >> the modem hangs up). You may not think the DSL modem is
    >> calling each
    >> time you want a connection because the session should only take
    >> a
    >> partial second to establish. The only way to keep the session
    >> from
    >> expiring is to use a keep-alive function in the modem. If your
    >> modem
    >> doesn't have that then look in the PPPoE settings (used for DSL
    >> connects) in your router to see if it has a keep-alive
    >> function.
    >>

    > There are no settings other than the ones I've shown. I'm not
    > sure I understand when you say that the modem hangs up if the
    > session becomes idle.


    'Inactive' -- as you would expect, no requests for address lookup from
    your end, no following URLs, and so on. If it will help, I've owned
    three DSL-modem/routers and each offered a user-selectable connection
    timeout setting on the configuration page. For mine, a choice of '0
    seconds' is "always on".

    > Sometimes I leave it idle for long periods
    > while I do other things, come back and start browsing,
    > downloading or whatever without having to redial.


    Depends on a default (if any) on your DSL/router. Usually, 'redial' is
    automatic (meaning, as soon as you initiate some kind of request) and
    transparent to the user if the DSL connection has a strong signal and
    there is no unusual problem with authentication. Though I have not seen
    it, I suppose it's possible your ISP sets some kind of maximum timeout
    for users. Also, it is entirely possible to have a valid ADSL 'sync'
    with the ISP, and not be logged-in. Usually, that is indicated by
    separate LEDs, or a single LED with multiple colors or
    'flashing/steady', and so on.

    [...]
    > What I want to do is to avoid having to open the dialer and click
    > 'connect' every time I'm logged out from my ISP. Sometimes my
    > connection stays up for hours, but sometimes drops every few
    > minutes. The loss of connection is not always immediately
    > obvious.


    You mention that your other DSL/router died. If that event was related
    to external line problems, you may be seeing some of the same conditions
    now. ADSL modems continuously monitor signal quality and adjust their
    line equalization and data rate to preserve or enhance signal/noise
    ratio (and thus bit error ratio). Line quality varies throughout the
    day and over many days. If you have a flaky connection, your service
    can be 'good' one moment and drop-out the next. Usually, ISPs take
    responsibility for line quality up to the Network Interface Device (NID)
    outside your property. If you feel convinced the internal wiring is not
    at fault and the DSL/router is otherwise working normally, call the ISP
    and request a line check.
    Anyone, Aug 18, 2010
    #19
  20. pawihte

    Anyone Guest

    chuckcar wrote:
    > Desk Rabbit <> wrote in
    > news:i4g4lp$q0a$:
    >
    >> On 17/08/2010 17:58, pawihte wrote:
    >>> Desk Rabbit wrote:
    >>>> On 17/08/2010 16:45, pawihte wrote:
    >>> The question was not a generic "how can I have an always on
    >>> connection?", but whether it's possible with _this_ modem.
    >>>
    >>> In any case, this modem IS a router, or so the manual says, as

    >> So stop calling it a modem!!!!!!
    >>
    >> (Generally)If it is a router the dialling will be in the router
    >> firmware and most will have an always on option. If it is a modem then
    >> the dialling will be in software on your computer.
    >>
    >> A NAT router is far more secure than a modem.

    >
    > No, it *is* a modem. The fact that it has some networking hardware built
    > into it doesn't change that a bit.


    Yes, it -is- a modem and a router if it has NAT.

    > Hmm, this conversation sounds vaguely
    > familiar somehow...


    That is probably because more than a few people tried to tell you that
    you did not understand very much about this technology the last time
    this discussion arose.
    Anyone, Aug 18, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Jeremy Whitley
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    18,783
    CCNA Student
    Aug 29, 2007
  2. [L.]
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    15,438
  3. Feck
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    520
  4. BH2
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    74,461
  5. npro
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    269
Loading...

Share This Page