How to set a password on a cd/dvd?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by [mfk], Aug 1, 2007.

  1. [mfk]

    [mfk] Guest

    Hello,
    does exist a tool that sets a password to access to a specific cd or dvd?

    i'm on Win Xp.

    Thank you,
    F.
     
    [mfk], Aug 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. [mfk]

    Todd H. Guest

    "[mfk]" <> writes:

    > Hello,
    > does exist a tool that sets a password to access to a specific cd or dvd?
    >
    > i'm on Win Xp.


    Nothing native to XP Home that I'm aware of.

    But gpg
    http://www.gnupg.org/
    is an encryption tool that can encrypt files such that a password or
    certificate is required to read them.

    Who needs to read these cd's and dvd's and how technical are they?

    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., Aug 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. [mfk]

    [mfk] Guest

    > Who needs to read these cd's and dvd's and how technical are they?
    >
    > --
    > Todd H.
    > http://www.toddh.net/


    Hello Todd!

    Really thanks for your answer. The dvd is for a friend of mine in another
    country, on the DVD will be burned some video conferences..

    Tnx,
    F.
     
    [mfk], Aug 2, 2007
    #3
  4. (Todd H.) (07-08-02 10:25:53):

    > > Really thanks for your answer. The dvd is for a friend of mine in
    > > another country, on the DVD will be burned some video conferences..

    >
    > Yeah, if it's just one consumer of these you could go as simple as a
    > winzip password (which I believe in recent versions is actually
    > decently robust), or zip or tar up the files and then gpg the zip or
    > tar file.


    There are more transparent and secure solutions, like filesystem
    encryption. I know from personal experience that this works with Linux,
    but it will not work too well with Windows (I couldn't get it to work
    with it at all).


    Regards,
    Ertugrul Söylemez.


    --
    Security is the one concept, which makes things in your life stay as
    they are. Otto is a man, who is afraid of changes in his life; so
    naturally he does not employ security.
     
    Ertugrul Soeylemez, Aug 2, 2007
    #4
  5. [mfk]

    Todd H. Guest

    "[mfk]" <> writes:

    > > Who needs to read these cd's and dvd's and how technical are they?
    > >
    > > --
    > > Todd H.
    > > http://www.toddh.net/

    >
    > Hello Todd!
    >
    > Really thanks for your answer. The dvd is for a friend of mine in another
    > country, on the DVD will be burned some video conferences..


    Yeah, if it's just one consumer of these you could go as simple as a
    winzip password (which I believe in recent versions is actually
    decently robust), or zip or tar up the files and then gpg the zip or
    tar file.

    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., Aug 2, 2007
    #5
  6. [mfk]

    Todd H. Guest

    Ertugrul Soeylemez <> writes:

    > (Todd H.) (07-08-02 10:25:53):
    >
    > > > Really thanks for your answer. The dvd is for a friend of mine in
    > > > another country, on the DVD will be burned some video conferences..

    > >
    > > Yeah, if it's just one consumer of these you could go as simple as a
    > > winzip password (which I believe in recent versions is actually
    > > decently robust), or zip or tar up the files and then gpg the zip or
    > > tar file.

    >
    > There are more transparent and secure solutions, like filesystem
    > encryption. I know from personal experience that this works with Linux,
    > but it will not work too well with Windows (I couldn't get it to work
    > with it at all).


    Not working at all on Windows doesn't sound terribly transparent to
    me. :)

    And unless you've discovered something about GPG the rest of the world
    doesn't know, you'll be hard pressed to make the "more secure"
    argument either.

    WinZip's encryption used to have a significant flaw in it, but I
    believe they've corrected it and it is not considered strong. I'm not
    sure if they're open source or not, or if they're using a widely peer
    reviewed encryption implementation or not though.

    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., Aug 2, 2007
    #6
  7. [mfk]

    Todd H. Guest

    (Todd H.) writes:

    > Ertugrul Soeylemez <> writes:
    >
    > > (Todd H.) (07-08-02 10:25:53):
    > >
    > > > > Really thanks for your answer. The dvd is for a friend of mine in
    > > > > another country, on the DVD will be burned some video conferences..
    > > >
    > > > Yeah, if it's just one consumer of these you could go as simple as a
    > > > winzip password (which I believe in recent versions is actually
    > > > decently robust), or zip or tar up the files and then gpg the zip or
    > > > tar file.

    > >
    > > There are more transparent and secure solutions, like filesystem
    > > encryption. I know from personal experience that this works with Linux,
    > > but it will not work too well with Windows (I couldn't get it to work
    > > with it at all).

    >
    > Not working at all on Windows doesn't sound terribly transparent to
    > me. :)
    >
    > And unless you've discovered something about GPG the rest of the world
    > doesn't know, you'll be hard pressed to make the "more secure"
    > argument either.
    >
    > WinZip's encryption used to have a significant flaw in it, but I
    > believe they've corrected it and it is not


    *NOW*

    > considered strong. I'm not sure if they're open source or not, or
    > if they're using a widely peer reviewed encryption implementation or
    > not though.


    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., Aug 2, 2007
    #7
  8. [mfk]

    Bart Bailey Guest

    In Message-ID:<> posted on 02 Aug 2007 11:02:07
    -0500, Todd H. wrote: Begin

    >WinZip's encryption used to have a significant flaw in it,


    wasn't it just a basic RC4 at one time?

    >but I
    >believe they've corrected it and it is not considered strong. I'm not
    >sure if they're open source or not, or if they're using a widely peer
    >reviewed encryption implementation or not though.


    I think the current version of WinZip uses AES (Rijndael),
    I do know that version v3.3 of WinRar uses AES,
    haven't tried the latest v3.7 WinRar but guess it to be the same.
    In WinRar even the contained file names can be encrypted.

    --

    Bart
     
    Bart Bailey, Aug 2, 2007
    #8
  9. [mfk]

    Todd H. Guest

    Bart Bailey <> writes:

    > In Message-ID:<> posted on 02 Aug 2007 11:02:07
    > -0500, Todd H. wrote: Begin
    >
    > >WinZip's encryption used to have a significant flaw in it,

    >
    > wasn't it just a basic RC4 at one time?


    I'm not sure, but I recall it was rather brutable. A quick dig
    uncovered this advisory for those old versions:
    http://secunia.com/advisories/8020/


    They also botched their initial foray into AES, but that's supposedly
    been fixed since:
    http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1030095


    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., Aug 2, 2007
    #9
  10. (Todd H.) (07-08-02 11:02:07):

    > > There are more transparent and secure solutions, like filesystem
    > > encryption. I know from personal experience that this works with
    > > Linux, but it will not work too well with Windows (I couldn't get it
    > > to work with it at all).

    >
    > Not working at all on Windows doesn't sound terribly transparent to
    > me. :)


    It _might_ work with things like TrueCrypt or FreeOTFE. I wouldn't
    count on it, though. I just said that I didn't get it to work. =)


    > And unless you've discovered something about GPG the rest of the world
    > doesn't know, you'll be hard pressed to make the "more secure"
    > argument either.


    More secure in terms of better secrecy. GPG does not encrypt
    filesystems, just files' contents.


    > WinZip's encryption used to have a significant flaw in it, but I
    > believe they've corrected it and it is not considered strong. I'm not
    > sure if they're open source or not, or if they're using a widely peer
    > reviewed encryption implementation or not though.


    I don't know. But I never trust closed-source encryption, regardless of
    whether the cipher is well-known or not. For normal users, i.e. people
    who don't need to hide things from the NSA, RC4 is just as secure as
    AES. It's the implementation that matters.


    Regards,
    Ertugrul Söylemez.


    --
    Security is the one concept, which makes things in your life stay as
    they are. Otto is a man, who is afraid of changes in his life; so
    naturally he does not employ security.
     
    Ertugrul Soeylemez, Aug 5, 2007
    #10
  11. [mfk]

    Hexalon Guest

    On Aug 1, 3:11 am, "[mfk]" <> wrote:
    > Hello,
    > does exist a tool that sets a password to access to a specific cd or dvd?
    >
    > i'm on Win Xp.
    >
    > Thank you,
    > F.


    run gpedit.msc then goto expand Administrative Templates under the
    User Configuration, expand Window Components, expand Windows Explorer,
    enforce the option "Prevent access to drives from My Computer".
     
    Hexalon, Aug 6, 2007
    #11
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