How to secure yourself from the Central Security Service

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    Hi:

    Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    Service:

    1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM

    2. Make sure your MAC addy is dynamic

    3. Access the internet via a publicly-available wireless access point
    -- such as an internet cafe

    4. Use a very powerful and sensitive wireless transmitter/receiver for
    the internet so that you can use the access point from at least 1/4
    mile away.

    Now run along and have fun on the net w/out oppression from the
    worthless POS Central Security Service dirtbags.


    Best of luck
    GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009
    #1
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  2. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    GreenXenon wrote

    > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security Service:


    Pity that is just another of your pathetic little drug crazed fantasys, child.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #2
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  3. GreenXenon

    Martin Guest

    GreenXenon wrote:
    > Hi:
    >
    > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > Service:
    >
    > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM


    I remember those days. I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a
    bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"

    If you didn't screw up you could then load a mylar tape with rest of the
    boot-strap loader and hopefully kick in the disk drive.

    God help everyone if there was a power cut!

    You're barking!
    Martin, Jun 21, 2009
    #3
  4. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    Martin wrote
    > GreenXenon wrote


    >> Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security Service:


    >> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM


    > I remember those days.


    Nope.

    > I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"


    That was replaced by diode panels where you cut out physical
    diodes with a pair of side cutters to 'program' the boot loader.

    And that was replaced by eproms, which arent NVRAM either.

    > If you didn't screw up you could then load a mylar tape with rest of the boot-strap loader and hopefully kick in the
    > disk drive.


    The ones I started with didnt even have a disk drive at all,
    just an ARS33 teletype with papertape reader and punch.

    > God help everyone if there was a power cut!


    That was no problem, the core contents wasnt volatile, it remains over a power cut.

    > You're barking!


    You did get that bit right.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #4
  5. GreenXenon

    Martin Guest

    Rod Speed wrote:
    > Martin wrote
    >> GreenXenon wrote

    >
    >>> Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security Service:

    >
    >>> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM

    >
    >> I remember those days.

    >
    > Nope.


    Well yes actually. Is it really required that some people just HAVE to
    argue about everything?

    When I started I was designing racks and racks of 7400 series chips that
    built the processor. I think I would have noticed if there was any NVRAM
    about.

    >
    >> I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"

    >
    > That was replaced by diode panels where you cut out physical
    > diodes with a pair of side cutters to 'program' the boot loader.


    And you know my background how exactly?

    I suppose you'll have some commenting to do when I also tell you I had
    to (occasionally) toggle individual bits in the microcode (yes, we even
    had them in the days of 7400 series) with a panel of push-button
    switches, one of which was called (and I can't remember the exact name)
    Julia because the designer had an off and decided to just name a
    bit-state after his wife.

    I mean, tell an anecdote about your own background, but don't just say
    "nope" about mine when I designed processors without an NVRAM in sight.

    >
    >> You're barking!

    >
    > You did get that bit right.


    Well thanks a bunch you condescending moron.
    >
    >
    Martin, Jun 21, 2009
    #5
  6. Just because you're paranoid does not mean they're not after you. Better
    turn your computer off and keep it that way.




    "GreenXenon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi:
    >
    > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > Service:
    >
    > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM
    >
    > 2. Make sure your MAC addy is dynamic
    >
    > 3. Access the internet via a publicly-available wireless access point
    > -- such as an internet cafe
    >
    > 4. Use a very powerful and sensitive wireless transmitter/receiver for
    > the internet so that you can use the access point from at least 1/4
    > mile away.
    >
    > Now run along and have fun on the net w/out oppression from the
    > worthless POS Central Security Service dirtbags.
    >
    >
    > Best of luck
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 21, 2009
    #6
  7. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    On Jun 20, 5:15 pm, Martin <> wrote:
    > GreenXenon wrote:
    > > Hi:

    >
    > > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > > Service:

    >
    > > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM

    >
    > I remember those days. I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a
    > bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"
    >
    > If you didn't screw up you could then load a mylar tape with rest of the
    > boot-strap loader and hopefully kick in the disk drive.
    >
    > God help everyone if there was a power cut!
    >
    > You're barking!


    It's best if the only RAM in the computer is Twin Transistor RAM and
    the only ROM in the computer is mask-programmed ROM. That way you get
    the most security.

    Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW, each time the
    power is offed, the network card should generate a completely new MAC
    addy and have no trace of the old one.
    GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009
    #7
  8. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    GreenXenon wrote
    > Martin <> wrote
    >> GreenXenon wrote


    >>> Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security Service:


    >>> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM


    >> I remember those days. I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a
    >> bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"


    >> If you didn't screw up you could then load a mylar tape with
    >> rest of the boot-strap loader and hopefully kick in the disk drive.


    >> God help everyone if there was a power cut!


    >> You're barking!


    > It's best if the only RAM in the computer is Twin Transistor RAM


    And true ram is fine.

    > and the only ROM in the computer is mask-programmed ROM.


    More pig ignorant drivel. eprom is fine too when there
    is no high voltage thats required to program it present.

    > That way you get the most security.


    Utterly mangled all over again.

    You get the most security by not putting anything you care
    about security wise into the PC in the first place, child.

    > Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    > each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    > a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.


    Fat lot of good that will do you, child.

    Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #8
  9. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    Martin wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote
    >> Martin wrote
    >>> GreenXenon wrote


    >>>> Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security Service:


    >>>> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM


    >>> I remember those days.


    >> Nope.


    > Well yes actually.


    Nope. You are utterly mangling what actually happened in those days.

    > Is it really required that some people just HAVE to argue about everything?


    You spew mindless pig ignorant shit, you may well find that
    someone will point out that its utterly mindless pig ignorant shit.

    > When I started I was designing racks and racks of 7400 series chips that built the processor.


    A mere child. Some of us were doing that with tubes, discrete transistors, RTL etc etc etc, child.

    > I think I would have noticed if there was any NVRAM about.


    I didnt say there was any NVRAM in those, child.

    >>> I had to toggle in a bootstrap-loader from a bunch of toggle switches, load the registers, then press "execute"


    >> That was replaced by diode panels where you cut out physical
    >> diodes with a pair of side cutters to 'program' the boot loader.


    > And you know my background how exactly?


    Dont need to know a damned thing about your background.

    All I need to know is what replaced toggling in the boot loader.

    > I suppose you'll have some commenting to do when I also tell you I had to (occasionally) toggle individual bits in the
    > microcode (yes, we even had them in the days of 7400 series) with a panel of push-button switches, one of which was
    > called (and I can't remember the exact name) Julia because the designer had an off and decided to just name a
    > bit-state after his wife.


    All completely and utterly irrelevant to what replaced toggling in the boot loader.

    > I mean, tell an anecdote about your own background, but don't just say
    > "nope" about mine when I designed processors without an NVRAM in sight.


    Never said a word about whether there was any NVRAM in sight.

    >>> You're barking!


    >> You did get that bit right.


    > Well thanks a bunch you condescending moron.


    Never ever could bullshit its way out of a wet paper bag, you terminal fuckwit/pathetic excuse for a bullshit artist.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #9
  10. GreenXenon

    PeeCee Guest

    "GreenXenon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi:
    >
    > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > Service:
    >
    > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM
    >
    > 2. Make sure your MAC addy is dynamic
    >
    > 3. Access the internet via a publicly-available wireless access point
    > -- such as an internet cafe



    Where they can set up a packet scanner and log everything you send and
    recieve.
    Don't forget they don't have to have access to the Cafe, all they have to do
    is put the packet sniffer in at the Exchange/Cable cabinet.
    You will be easy enough to pick up from your 'Signature'

    >
    > 4. Use a very powerful and sensitive wireless transmitter/receiver for
    > the internet so that you can use the access point from at least 1/4
    > mile away.


    Never heard of RDF?
    Or how the UK listened into the Nazi's 'Wireless Traffic' during WW2 and
    broke their Enigma and Geheimschreibers (secret writers) using nothing more
    sophisticated than a bunch of Relays and Vacumn Tubes.

    >
    > Now run along and have fun on the net w/out oppression from the
    > worthless POS Central Security Service dirtbags.
    >
    >
    > Best of luck


    P.
    PeeCee, Jun 21, 2009
    #10
  11. GreenXenon

    Martin Guest

    Rod Speed wrote:

    > I didnt say there was any NVRAM in those, child.


    him: >> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM

    me: > > I remember those days.

    you: Nope.

    So what WERE you saying then?
    Martin, Jun 21, 2009
    #11
  12. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    On Jun 20, 11:19 pm, "Rod Speed" <> wrote:


    > GreenXenon wrote



    > > Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    > > each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    > > a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.

    >



    >
    > Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.



    Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses. At
    least not immediately.
    GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009
    #12
  13. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    On Jun 21, 12:18 am, "PeeCee" <> wrote:


    > "GreenXenon" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...



    >
    > > Hi:

    >
    > > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > > Service:

    >
    > > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM

    >
    > > 2. Make sure your MAC addy is dynamic

    >
    > > 3. Access the internet via a publicly-available wireless access point
    > > -- such as an internet cafe

    >



    > Where they can set up a packet scanner and log everything you send and
    > recieve.
    > Don't forget they don't have to have access to the Cafe, all they have to do
    > is put the packet sniffer in at the Exchange/Cable cabinet.
    > You will be easy enough to pick up from your 'Signature'



    What is my "signature"?
    GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009
    #13
  14. GreenXenon

    Eric Gisin Guest

    Do not feed the schizo troll.

    "GreenXenon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi:
    >
    > Here is how to secure yourself against the evil Central Security
    > Service:
    >
    > 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM
    >
    > 2. Make sure your MAC addy is dynamic
    >
    > 3. Access the internet via a publicly-available wireless access point
    > -- such as an internet cafe
    >
    > 4. Use a very powerful and sensitive wireless transmitter/receiver for
    > the internet so that you can use the access point from at least 1/4
    > mile away.
    >
    > Now run along and have fun on the net w/out oppression from the
    > worthless POS Central Security Service dirtbags.
    >
    >
    > Best of luck
    Eric Gisin, Jun 21, 2009
    #14
  15. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    GreenXenon wrote
    > Rod Speed <> wrote
    >> GreenXenon wrote


    >>> Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    >>> each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    >>> a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.


    >> Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.


    > Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses.


    Corse they do.

    > At least not immediately.


    Wrong, as always.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #15
  16. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    Martin wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote


    >> I didnt say there was any NVRAM in those, child.


    > him: >> 1. Make sure your computer does NOT have any NVRAM


    > me: > > I remember those days.


    > you: Nope.


    > So what WERE you saying then?


    I was clearly saying that you were remembering it wrong.

    And I never ever said that there werent days when computers had no NVRAM, of course there were.

    You carefully deleted from the quoting what I said you remembered wrong.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #16
  17. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    On Jun 21, 10:58 am, "Rod Speed" <> wrote:


    > GreenXenon wrote



    >
    > > Rod Speed <> wrote



    > >> GreenXenon wrote



    > >>> Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    > >>> each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    > >>> a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.



    > >> Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.



    > > Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses.



    >
    > Corse they do.



    How?
    GreenXenon, Jun 21, 2009
    #17
  18. GreenXenon

    Rod Speed Guest

    GreenXenon wrote
    > Rod Speed <> wrote
    >> GreenXenon wrote
    >>> Rod Speed <> wrote
    >>>> GreenXenon wrote


    >>>>> Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    >>>>> each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    >>>>> a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.


    >>>> Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.


    >>> Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses.


    >> Corse they do.


    > How?


    If I told you that I'd have to kill you. Again.
    Rod Speed, Jun 21, 2009
    #18
  19. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    On Jun 21, 2:51 pm, "Rod Speed" <> wrote:

    > GreenXenon wrote


    >
    > > Rod Speed <> wrote


    > >> GreenXenon wrote


    > >>> Rod Speed <> wrote


    > >>>> GreenXenon wrote


    > >>>>> Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    > >>>>> each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    > >>>>> a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.


    > >>>> Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.


    > >>> Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses.


    > >> Corse they do.


    > > How?


    >
    > If I told you that I'd have to kill you. Again.



    You always say that. Just tell me and get it over with.
    GreenXenon, Jun 22, 2009
    #19
  20. "GreenXenon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Jun 21, 2:51 pm, "Rod Speed" <> wrote:
    >
    >> GreenXenon wrote

    >
    >>
    >> > Rod Speed <> wrote

    >
    >> >> GreenXenon wrote

    >
    >> >>> Rod Speed <> wrote

    >
    >> >>>> GreenXenon wrote

    >
    >> >>>>> Also, the MAC addy should be completely dynamic. IOW,
    >> >>>>> each time the power is offed, the network card should generate
    >> >>>>> a completely new MAC addy and have no trace of the old one.

    >
    >> >>>> Its completely trivial to work out what MAC addresses you have used.

    >
    >> >>> Yeah but they wouldn't know it's me using those MAC addresses.

    >
    >> >> Corse they do.

    >
    >> > How?

    >
    >>
    >> If I told you that I'd have to kill you. Again.

    >
    >
    > You always say that. Just tell me and get it over with.



    Just kill him and get over with. Sheesh!
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 22, 2009
    #20
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