How to recover a photo I was forced to delete

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Silent Knight, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. Silent Knight

    The Real Bev Guest

    On 06/14/2014 08:28 AM, PeterN wrote:

    > On 6/14/2014 2:24 AM, The Real Bev wrote:
    >>
    >> I would assume that a former soldier would at the very least be a better
    >> shot and less likely to spray bullets all over hell and gone than a cop
    >> with the same years of experience. Just a guess. The only cop I ever
    >> actually knew personally was a member of the CHP and was a real asshole.

    >
    > During my time in the military, I came to the conclusion that assuming
    > the Soviet Union's troops were as good at marksmanship as ours, in case
    > of war the best place to be was on the front lines.


    Long ago we bought some 22 rifles and a 22 revolver and went up into the
    mountains to learn to shoot. I'm incredibly bad, possibly for the same
    reason my handwriting sucks and I can't play the violin.

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    ================================================================
    "Mr Panetta also revealed that the US Navy Seals made the final
    decision to kill bin Laden rather than the president."
    --S. Swinford, The Telegraph
    [Aside from that minor error, those Seals did a fantastic job!]
    The Real Bev, Jun 15, 2014
    1. Advertising

  2. Silent Knight

    The Real Bev Guest

    On 06/14/2014 09:35 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:

    > While nosense will say that "that's not what the discussion is about",
    > it's irritating that the OP hasn't returned to say if he recovered the
    > photo, or ever explained what was so inappropriate that he had to
    > photograph it.


    Drive-by posting and thread drift. Just like real life :)

    --
    Cheers, Bev
    ================================================================
    "Mr Panetta also revealed that the US Navy Seals made the final
    decision to kill bin Laden rather than the president."
    --S. Swinford, The Telegraph
    [Aside from that minor error, those Seals did a fantastic job!]
    The Real Bev, Jun 15, 2014
    1. Advertising

  3. Silent Knight

    J. Clarke Guest

    In article <lnjapq$vm4$>, says...
    >
    > On 06/14/2014 08:28 AM, PeterN wrote:
    >
    > > On 6/14/2014 2:24 AM, The Real Bev wrote:
    > >>
    > >> I would assume that a former soldier would at the very least be a better
    > >> shot and less likely to spray bullets all over hell and gone than a cop
    > >> with the same years of experience. Just a guess. The only cop I ever
    > >> actually knew personally was a member of the CHP and was a real asshole.

    > >
    > > During my time in the military, I came to the conclusion that assuming
    > > the Soviet Union's troops were as good at marksmanship as ours, in case
    > > of war the best place to be was on the front lines.

    >
    > Long ago we bought some 22 rifles and a 22 revolver and went up into the
    > mountains to learn to shoot. I'm incredibly bad, possibly for the same
    > reason my handwriting sucks and I can't play the violin.


    Did you have an instructor with you who knew what he was doing? One
    problem with marksmanship instruction is getting people who think
    they're great shots to unlearn all the bad habits they've developed in
    many years of hitting a tin can 20 feet away with 3 shots out of 5.
    Without a competent coach you won't even be aware of what you're doing
    wrong.
    J. Clarke, Jun 15, 2014
  4. Silent Knight

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/15/2014 2:40 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-15 05:26:17 +0000, The Real Bev <> said:
    >
    >> On 06/14/2014 08:28 AM, PeterN wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 6/14/2014 2:24 AM, The Real Bev wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I would assume that a former soldier would at the very least be a
    >>>> better
    >>>> shot and less likely to spray bullets all over hell and gone than a cop
    >>>> with the same years of experience. Just a guess. The only cop I ever
    >>>> actually knew personally was a member of the CHP and was a real
    >>>> asshole.
    >>>
    >>> During my time in the military, I came to the conclusion that assuming
    >>> the Soviet Union's troops were as good at marksmanship as ours, in case
    >>> of war the best place to be was on the front lines.

    >>
    >> Long ago we bought some 22 rifles and a 22 revolver and went up into
    >> the mountains to learn to shoot. I'm incredibly bad, possibly for the
    >> same reason my handwriting sucks and I can't play the violin.

    >
    > I started shooting under the guidance of my father as an 8 year old
    > using an air rifle. By 11 I was getting into serious target shooting
    > with my father shooting .22 rifle and .22 & .38 Special pistol. Then I
    > transitioned to military and combat/defense weapons. Now at 65, I can
    > say shooting and marksmanship for me has been like riding a bicycle, and
    > very easy.
    > < https://db.tt/FszZBooz >
    >


    I learned in high school. I haven't fired in years. My hands are no
    longer as steady or strong as they once were. Yes, i can still ride a
    bicycle, but not as far, or as fast.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 15, 2014
  5. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> and then only if the pascode has not
    > >> >> changed?
    > >> >
    > >> >doesn't matter.
    > >>
    > >> Why doesn't it matter? Is there some internal code in the iPhone which
    > >> is known to iTunes after registration and which makes no use of the
    > >> passcode?

    > >
    > >yes.
    > >
    > >there is a key exchange.

    >
    > If you had released this secret earlier it would have made it easier
    > for others to understand what you were saying.


    it's didn't come up in the discussion until the last few posts.
    nospam, Jun 15, 2014
  6. Silent Knight

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/15/2014 12:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-15 15:24:14 +0000, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 6/15/2014 2:40 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    >>> On 2014-06-15 05:26:17 +0000, The Real Bev <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On 06/14/2014 08:28 AM, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 6/14/2014 2:24 AM, The Real Bev wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I would assume that a former soldier would at the very least be a
    >>>>>> better
    >>>>>> shot and less likely to spray bullets all over hell and gone than
    >>>>>> a cop
    >>>>>> with the same years of experience. Just a guess. The only cop I
    >>>>>> ever
    >>>>>> actually knew personally was a member of the CHP and was a real
    >>>>>> asshole.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> During my time in the military, I came to the conclusion that assuming
    >>>>> the Soviet Union's troops were as good at marksmanship as ours, in
    >>>>> case
    >>>>> of war the best place to be was on the front lines.
    >>>>
    >>>> Long ago we bought some 22 rifles and a 22 revolver and went up into
    >>>> the mountains to learn to shoot. I'm incredibly bad, possibly for the
    >>>> same reason my handwriting sucks and I can't play the violin.
    >>>
    >>> I started shooting under the guidance of my father as an 8 year old
    >>> using an air rifle. By 11 I was getting into serious target shooting
    >>> with my father shooting .22 rifle and .22 & .38 Special pistol. Then I
    >>> transitioned to military and combat/defense weapons. Now at 65, I can
    >>> say shooting and marksmanship for me has been like riding a bicycle, and
    >>> very easy.
    >>> < https://db.tt/FszZBooz >
    >>>

    >>
    >> I learned in high school. I haven't fired in years. My hands are no
    >> longer as steady or strong as they once were. Yes, i can still ride a
    >> bicycle, but not as far, or as fast.

    >
    > As far as bike riding goes I tend to agree, I am not the fit individual
    > of yore. However, for target shooting once you have moved past the
    > basics of sight picture, breathing, and trigger control (or squeeze, not
    > pull) it becomes an almost meditative process akin to the concept of the
    > "Zen archer". I find that the mental preparation for each shot is key to
    > consistent accuracy, and these days shooting well comes easier than
    > bicycle riding to good effect.
    >
    > It is that thing of combining all the basic elements, concentrating on
    > the front sight and not the target (that is with iron, or open sights,
    > optic sights require a slightly different philosophy), and not
    > anticipating the shot. Do everything right, and the shot will go where
    > you intended. The biggest mistake shooters make is to snatch, or pull
    > the trigger when they anticipate that perfect moment. You might say
    > golfers have similar issues. Ultimately it comes down to practice,
    > practice, practice. ...and good training and sometimes coaching.
    >

    I have a friend who agrees with that philosophy. He used to travel to
    compete in international tournaments. He was rated among the top ten in
    the world. Unfortunately, he has some balance and muscular control issues.

    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 15, 2014
  7. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> >> and then only if the pascode has not
    > >> >> >> changed?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >doesn't matter.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Why doesn't it matter? Is there some internal code in the iPhone which
    > >> >> is known to iTunes after registration and which makes no use of the
    > >> >> passcode?
    > >> >
    > >> >yes.
    > >> >
    > >> >there is a key exchange.
    > >>
    > >> If you had released this secret earlier it would have made it easier
    > >> for others to understand what you were saying.

    > >
    > >it's didn't come up in the discussion until the last few posts.

    >
    > And onlly then because I dragged it out of you.


    peter is the one who first mentioned changing the passcode.

    > Prior to the emergence of that information nothing you said made
    > sense.


    of course it made sense.
    nospam, Jun 15, 2014
  8. Silent Knight

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2014 16:05:08 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >Yup! It is the only way if you are going to be in anyway competitive as
    >a competition shooter. I would imagine he has fired tens, or even
    >hundreds of thousands of rounds in training for his competition career.
    >I know I have.


    A resort we stayed in some years ago had a trap shooting range. I'd
    never tried it before, but I won a free session in a drawing the first
    night we stayed in the resort.

    With a loaner shotgun, I hit 23 out of 25 clays. I had to brag that
    night in the bar about being a natural at the sport. A fellow who had
    been in the sport for some time, and brought his own shotgun, invited
    me to shoot with him the next day.

    I hit about 12 of 25 that day. He gave me some pointers and
    instruction and we shot another round of 25. I got 8 out of 25 that
    time.

    That was the last time I tried it. I figured with more practice I'd
    he down to two or three out of 25. If any.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jun 16, 2014
  9. Silent Knight

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/15/2014 7:05 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-15 22:50:09 +0000, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 6/15/2014 12:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    >>> On 2014-06-15 15:24:14 +0000, PeterN <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On 6/15/2014 2:40 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    >>>>> On 2014-06-15 05:26:17 +0000, The Real Bev <>
    >>>>> said:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 06/14/2014 08:28 AM, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On 6/14/2014 2:24 AM, The Real Bev wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I would assume that a former soldier would at the very least be a
    >>>>>>>> better
    >>>>>>>> shot and less likely to spray bullets all over hell and gone than
    >>>>>>>> a cop
    >>>>>>>> with the same years of experience. Just a guess. The only cop I
    >>>>>>>> ever
    >>>>>>>> actually knew personally was a member of the CHP and was a real
    >>>>>>>> asshole.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> During my time in the military, I came to the conclusion that
    >>>>>>> assuming
    >>>>>>> the Soviet Union's troops were as good at marksmanship as ours, in
    >>>>>>> case
    >>>>>>> of war the best place to be was on the front lines.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Long ago we bought some 22 rifles and a 22 revolver and went up into
    >>>>>> the mountains to learn to shoot. I'm incredibly bad, possibly for
    >>>>>> the
    >>>>>> same reason my handwriting sucks and I can't play the violin.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I started shooting under the guidance of my father as an 8 year old
    >>>>> using an air rifle. By 11 I was getting into serious target shooting
    >>>>> with my father shooting .22 rifle and .22 & .38 Special pistol. Then I
    >>>>> transitioned to military and combat/defense weapons. Now at 65, I can
    >>>>> say shooting and marksmanship for me has been like riding a
    >>>>> bicycle, and
    >>>>> very easy.
    >>>>> < https://db.tt/FszZBooz >
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I learned in high school. I haven't fired in years. My hands are no
    >>>> longer as steady or strong as they once were. Yes, i can still ride a
    >>>> bicycle, but not as far, or as fast.
    >>>
    >>> As far as bike riding goes I tend to agree, I am not the fit individual
    >>> of yore. However, for target shooting once you have moved past the
    >>> basics of sight picture, breathing, and trigger control (or squeeze, not
    >>> pull) it becomes an almost meditative process akin to the concept of the
    >>> "Zen archer". I find that the mental preparation for each shot is key to
    >>> consistent accuracy, and these days shooting well comes easier than
    >>> bicycle riding to good effect.
    >>>
    >>> It is that thing of combining all the basic elements, concentrating on
    >>> the front sight and not the target (that is with iron, or open sights,
    >>> optic sights require a slightly different philosophy), and not
    >>> anticipating the shot. Do everything right, and the shot will go where
    >>> you intended. The biggest mistake shooters make is to snatch, or pull
    >>> the trigger when they anticipate that perfect moment. You might say
    >>> golfers have similar issues. Ultimately it comes down to practice,
    >>> practice, practice. ...and good training and sometimes coaching.
    >>>

    >> I have a friend who agrees with that philosophy. He used to travel to
    >> compete in international tournaments. He was rated among the top ten
    >> in the world.

    >
    > Yup! It is the only way if you are going to be in anyway competitive as
    > a competition shooter. I would imagine he has fired tens, or even
    > hundreds of thousands of rounds in training for his competition career.
    > I know I have.


    Yup!

    >
    >> Unfortunately, he has some balance and muscular control issues.

    >
    > That is sad, I hope that isn't related to a degenerative or neurological
    > disease.


    He has taken up photography as a hobby, which is how we met. He does not
    do competitive photography, just does his own thing for his own
    satisfaction. And he seems far more relaxed.


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 16, 2014
  10. Silent Knight

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/15/2014 8:00 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    > On Sun, 15 Jun 2014 16:05:08 -0700, Savageduck
    > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Yup! It is the only way if you are going to be in anyway competitive as
    >> a competition shooter. I would imagine he has fired tens, or even
    >> hundreds of thousands of rounds in training for his competition career.
    >> I know I have.

    >
    > A resort we stayed in some years ago had a trap shooting range. I'd
    > never tried it before, but I won a free session in a drawing the first
    > night we stayed in the resort.
    >
    > With a loaner shotgun, I hit 23 out of 25 clays. I had to brag that
    > night in the bar about being a natural at the sport. A fellow who had
    > been in the sport for some time, and brought his own shotgun, invited
    > me to shoot with him the next day.
    >
    > I hit about 12 of 25 that day. He gave me some pointers and
    > instruction and we shot another round of 25. I got 8 out of 25 that
    > time.
    >
    > That was the last time I tried it. I figured with more practice I'd
    > he down to two or three out of 25. If any.
    >
    >
    >


    I think many competitive sports are played in the same amount of space.
    The space between your ears.


    --
    PeterN
    PeterN, Jun 16, 2014
  11. Silent Knight

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2014 17:47:46 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2014-06-16 00:00:22 +0000, Tony Cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Sun, 15 Jun 2014 16:05:08 -0700, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yup! It is the only way if you are going to be in anyway competitive as
    >>> a competition shooter. I would imagine he has fired tens, or even
    >>> hundreds of thousands of rounds in training for his competition career.
    >>> I know I have.

    >>
    >> A resort we stayed in some years ago had a trap shooting range. I'd
    >> never tried it before, but I won a free session in a drawing the first
    >> night we stayed in the resort.

    >
    >Had you ever done any trap shooting, or fowling with a shotgun before?


    Nope. Never, as I said above. I had a .22/410 over-and-under as a
    teenager, but used it only one summer to shoot squirrels at my
    great-uncle's mink ranch. He paid me to do so, since squirrels steal
    the caged mink's food, frighten the mother mink, and mother mink tend
    to kill their kits when frightened.

    >> With a loaner shotgun, I hit 23 out of 25 clays. I had to brag that
    >> night in the bar about being a natural at the sport.

    >
    >That is pretty good if it was a first time doing that type of shooting.
    >
    >> A fellow who had been in the sport for some time, and brought his own
    >> shotgun, invited
    >> me to shoot with him the next day.
    >>
    >> I hit about 12 of 25 that day. He gave me some pointers and
    >> instruction and we shot another round of 25. I got 8 out of 25 that
    >> time.

    >
    > Then you were fortunate that first time out.


    Not knowing how to do it, I just did what was natural. As soon as I
    starting thinking I knew what I was doing, I got worse.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
    Tony Cooper, Jun 16, 2014
  12. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >there is no cost to using snprintf. it's a good habit to have.
    > >
    > >> The suggestion of "std::string" is amusing. There is
    > >> no such thing in C.

    > >
    > >that was my point.

    >
    > Now that I point it out that you were totally confused,
    > you make that bogus claim.


    i was never confused. c++ is vastly more capable than c, particularly
    with string handling.

    > But it is on on and on and on with the bull pucky!
    >
    > The question was what time is it, not how to build an
    > atomic clock. You've entirely missed the point and made
    > an ass of yourself (again).
    >
    > You claimed image recovery required a very complex
    > program that can do virtually any kind of *file*
    > *recovery*. It isn't true. And despite all the bull
    > pucky you've generated since, it still isn't true.


    it is if it wants to call itself a recovery app.

    what you wrote is a quick hack that only works for files from one type
    of camera and not particularly well at that.

    the fact that you are trying to justify it as something good is truly
    sad.

    > I can (and did) prove that with a very simple 65 line
    > program written in C.


    a buggy one.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  13. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> Linux "knows" about a larger variety of filesystems than
    > >> >> any other OS. You just can't get around that.
    > >> >
    > >> >quality not quantity.
    > >>
    > >> All this whining about something you can't understand.

    > >
    > >i understand it far more than you ever will.

    >
    > You keep saying things like that, and then once again go off
    > the deep end with non-sequiturs...


    it's true.

    > >> Recovering image files from any specific camera does not
    > >> require the US Army Corp of Engineers.

    > >
    > >nobody said it did, straw man.

    >
    > Oh, it's a straw man alright! Glad you acknowledged exactly
    > what you are doing. *You* are the one who claimed all of that
    > was needed. I just put a simple descriptive "title" on *your*
    > straw man argument.


    you are the one with the strawman. don't twist what i say.

    > Once again, the point was demonstrated very effectively that only
    > 65 lines of C code is enough to recover my *image* files from a
    > CF card. Nothing more is actually necessary, nor is all this
    > crap you put out in your straw man argument to divert from useful
    > discussion of the question at hand.


    nothing more is needed assuming everything fits into your incredibly
    narrow parameters.

    if you get a different camera or want to help someone else with a
    different camera or if you have a fragmented card, then you're screwed.

    the fact that you pretend otherwise shows us how much in denial you are.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  14. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> >> It has one single quirk that is useful to know about
    > >> >> >> though. The last JPEG or NEF file that it finds on the
    > >> >> >> card will be complete, but it will also include all data
    > >> >> >> on the rest of the card even if it has nothing to do
    > >> >> >> with that image file. Hence if a brand new 16G card has
    > >> >> >> one single image written to it, and it is then deleted
    > >> >> >> or the card is reformated, the image will be recovered
    > >> >> >> correctly but the file size will be 16G. There are
    > >> >> >> other ways to trim that last file to size. Normally it
    > >> >> >> will be something from a previous shoot that does not
    > >> >> >> need to be recovered, so the solution is to delete it...
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >that's not a 'simple quirk'. that's a major bug that needs to be fixed.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Nobody said it was "simple", except you.
    > >> >
    > >> >obviously i meant 'single quirk', since i was quoting what you wrote.
    > >> >
    > >> >oh no, i made a typo and i didn't notice it before posting and you're
    > >> >too stupid to realize it was a typo.
    > >>
    > >> It isn't a typo, you misread what I wrote.

    > >
    > >i was quoting what *you* wrote and wrote simple instead of single. any
    > >idiot could figure out what was meant.

    >
    > Any idiot can realize that "single" would not fit into
    > the sentence you produced.


    then why did you write it?

    i was quoting what *you* wrote, but made a typo.

    > A typo is putting the wrong
    > letters into what you write. That isn't what you did.


    yes it's exactly what i did. two letters were incorrect.

    > You read something wrong and wrote exactly what you were
    > thinking. But as usual, what you thought wasn't correct.


    the *only* mistake i made was saying simple instead of single. as said,
    it's a typo i did not catch prior to posting.

    you are as usual, blabbering.

    > >> The rest of this is still the same nonsense you've
    > >> repeated before, and we all know you blew it.

    > >
    > >what we know is you can't ever admit you're wrong.

    >
    > I admit when I'm wrong. You baffle yourself with bullshit.


    no you don't. you *never* do.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  15. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >all you can do is talk down to anyone who doesn't do it your way. sad.

    >
    > That is *all* you've done in this thread.


    not in the least. i've criticized your code because it's pretty bad,
    but not you.

    just look at what you write below! it's what *you* do.

    > >> Sorry if you are overwhelmed
    > >> by 100 line programs.

    > >
    > >i'm not overwhelmed with anything.
    > >
    > >when i first saw it, i knew fragmentation would be an issue and sure
    > >enough it was.

    >
    > Except it isn't an issue.


    it absolutely is an issue. anyone who claims otherwise is in denial.

    > That might be an issue for you, due to poor practices
    > elsewhere.


    it has nothing whatsoever to do with poor practices. it can happen to
    anyone.

    > But it is commonly noted in beginner
    > discussions about use and abuse of memory cards with
    > cameras that one should not delete individual files from
    > the card, and when the card is inserted into the camera
    > it should then be formatted, using the camera's menu
    > options for formatting cards. Bingo, no fragmentation!


    nonsense. there's no reason to format it each time nor does it have
    anything to do with beginners.

    the card can and does get fragmented in normal operation. users can and
    do delete photos during a session. there is no point in keeping obvious
    mistakes, such as when the flash didn't go off and the photo is
    entirely black.

    you're just trying to justify buggy software.

    > When card management is done properly there is never any
    > fragmentation on the card, and file recovery is a very
    > simple operation that need not be concerned.


    nonsense. there is no reason to format the card each time and that
    won't prevent fragmentation anyway. the user can still delete one or
    more photos during a session.

    you're just too lazy to do a good job in writing a recovery tool. it's
    a half-assed job.

    if you want to live within its limitations that's your doing, but to
    claim that recovery apps need nothing more than 65 lines of c is
    utterly ludicrous.

    > >i've written *far* more complicated apps than that and far more
    > >reliable too.

    >
    > Which is obfuscation, because this problem does not
    > require anything complicated in order to be exceedingly
    > reliable.


    it does if it wants to be reusable, extensible and handle all possible
    inputs, which it fails on all three counts.

    > Besides, I doubt that you've ever written anything that
    > was actually very complicated and also reliable. All
    > this noise you make suggests you get very carried away
    > with emotional attachment to specific points that
    > interest you at the expense of the overall program.
    > Missing the forest because there are all these trees in
    > the way...


    yet another ad hominem.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  16. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >i know c exceptionally well, but prefer to use modern and more capable
    > >languages.

    >
    > Which one do you prefer?


    it depends on the task. no one language is suitable for everything.

    i prefer c++ although for what i'm doing i need to use objective-c,
    which i despise but it does have some merits.

    it's very rare that people use straight c anymore with more modern
    languages available.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  17. Silent Knight

    PAS Guest

    "Tony Cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 13 Jun 2014 12:56:34 -0400, "PAS" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> I'm at a loss about why all this fuss about someone viewing
    >>> photographs taken with a phone. Do you have photographs on your phone
    >>> that you wouldn't want anyone else to see?

    >>
    >>The issue is not what anyone has to hide. I have nothing to hide but I
    >>still don't want cops or anyone else snooping in my phone. The issue is
    >>being forced to delete a photo which the police have no right to do. They
    >>have no right to take your phone and sift through it without a court order
    >>if you've committed no crime.
    >>

    > I don't mind a divergence in the thread to talk about any subject you
    > want to introduce, but the thread really hasn't been about the police
    > doing anything with your phone.


    That's what we do, we go on divergent paths in so manythreads :)

    > The person who wanted the OP's photo deleted was not a policeman. He
    > was an employee of a BAR station.
    >
    > The thread has drifted into a discussion about how data can be
    > obtained by a person who is not the owner of the phone and has come by
    > the phone illicitly.
    >
    > If a phone is lost - left somewhere and picked up by someone else -
    > the possibility of that person viewing photographs and data has been
    > mentioned. My question is why all the fuss about this. I'd regret
    > losing the phone, but there's nothing accessible with my phone that
    > would cause me any grief.
    >
    > There are no photographs on my phone that would embarrass me. I don't
    > care if you know who my contacts are. I have nothing stored in any
    > remote site that I would be distressed if someone accessed.


    I'm pretty much in the same boat as you on this. I have nothing in my phone
    that would embarrass me, or anything anywhere else. I would be upset if I
    lost my phone simply because I really like the one I have (LG Optimus G Pro)
    and don't want to pay for another one.
    PAS, Jun 16, 2014
  18. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >> That might be an issue for you, due to poor practices
    > >> elsewhere.

    > >
    > >it has nothing whatsoever to do with poor practices. it can happen to
    > >anyone.
    > >
    > >> But it is commonly noted in beginner
    > >> discussions about use and abuse of memory cards with
    > >> cameras that one should not delete individual files from
    > >> the card, and when the card is inserted into the camera
    > >> it should then be formatted, using the camera's menu
    > >> options for formatting cards. Bingo, no fragmentation!

    > >
    > >nonsense. there's no reason to format it each time nor does it have
    > >anything to do with beginners.
    > >
    > >the card can and does get fragmented in normal operation. users can and
    > >do delete photos during a session. there is no point in keeping obvious
    > >mistakes, such as when the flash didn't go off and the photo is
    > >entirely black.
    > >
    > >you're just trying to justify buggy software.

    >
    > The fact is that good practice is to reformat the card
    > every time it is placed in the camera, and to never
    > delete individual files.


    formatting every time is *not* required and a waste of time and there
    are many instances where deleting individual files is done.

    > The reason is simple: it guarantees that images can be
    > recovered if the metadata for the filesystem becomes
    > unreadable.


    there are no guarantees on any recovery process no matter what recovery
    tool is used or whether anyone adheres to your methods. nothing is
    perfect.

    however, commercial recovery utilities will successfully recover files
    in almost every circumstance, whether or not they're fragmented and in
    most cases, with the original file names intact. they are designed for
    real world scenarios.

    your hack won't.

    > Having a recovery program that understands the internals
    > of the filesystem is "wonderful", but it can result in a
    > situation where the image data becomes unrecoverable.


    complete nonsense.

    having a recovery program that understands the file system and deals
    with fragmentation drastically *improves* the chances of recovery.

    under no circumstances can it result in a situation where it would be
    unrecoverable.

    > >> When card management is done properly there is never any
    > >> fragmentation on the card, and file recovery is a very
    > >> simple operation that need not be concerned.

    > >
    > >nonsense. there is no reason to format the card each time and that
    > >won't prevent fragmentation anyway. the user can still delete one or
    > >more photos during a session.
    > >
    > >you're just too lazy to do a good job in writing a recovery tool. it's
    > >a half-assed job.
    > >
    > >if you want to live within its limitations that's your doing, but to
    > >claim that recovery apps need nothing more than 65 lines of c is
    > >utterly ludicrous.

    >
    > Your willingness to rely on unnecessary complexity is
    > inherently unreliable. I chose the safest route.


    complete nonsense. it's not unnecessary and not inherently unreliable.
    you have no idea what you're talking about.

    the safest and most reliable route for image recovery (or any recovery
    actually) to use a commercial recovery tool that has been designed to
    recover all types of files, fragmented or not, and which uses multiple
    algorithms so that it almost always succeeds and is also well tested by
    millions of users.

    not the case for your hack, which is inherently unreliable because it
    only works in a very narrow set of conditions.

    > >> >i've written *far* more complicated apps than that and far more
    > >> >reliable too.
    > >>
    > >> Which is obfuscation, because this problem does not
    > >> require anything complicated in order to be exceedingly
    > >> reliable.

    > >
    > >it does if it wants to be reusable, extensible and handle all possible
    > >inputs, which it fails on all three counts.

    >
    > But that is unnecessary complexity that serves no
    > purpose other than providing multiple failure routes by
    > which images can be *permantently* lost.


    nonsense. where do you come up with such crap?

    handling all possible inputs *avoids* multiple failure routes and there
    is *no* possible way anything can be lost because at no point is
    anything written to the file system.

    in the unlikely event it fails to find anything, nothing is lost or
    altered on the card. simply use another recovery app or send it off to
    a professional recovery service.

    you haven't any clue about this stuff, do you?

    > As noted, proper card management will totally avoid that
    > circumstance.


    nonsense. using a proper card recovery utility that handles any
    situation thrown at it will avoid that circumstance, without forcing
    the user to format every single time, which users do not normally do.
    in other words, real world scenarios.

    > >> Besides, I doubt that you've ever written anything that
    > >> was actually very complicated and also reliable. All
    > >> this noise you make suggests you get very carried away
    > >> with emotional attachment to specific points that
    > >> interest you at the expense of the overall program.
    > >> Missing the forest because there are all these trees in
    > >> the way...

    > >
    > >yet another ad hominem.

    >
    > It's not Ad Hominem, it's very valid commentary on what
    > you write here in this newsgroup, in this thread.


    not at all. you can't admit that your hack is inferior to commercial
    offerings,

    whether you're satisfied with it is up to you, but to claim that it's
    all that's needed is absurd.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  19. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Floyd L. Davidson
    <> wrote:

    > >> >i know c exceptionally well, but prefer to use modern and more capable
    > >> >languages.
    > >>
    > >> Which one do you prefer?

    > >
    > >it depends on the task. no one language is suitable for everything.
    > >
    > >i prefer c++ although for what i'm doing i need to use objective-c,
    > >which i despise but it does have some merits.
    > >
    > >it's very rare that people use straight c anymore with more modern
    > >languages available.

    >
    > Wow.


    wow what? what i wrote is true. you're very out of touch with reality.

    in nearly every case,
    mac & ios apps are written in objective-c, c++ and now swift.
    android apps are written in java.
    windows apps are written in c# or c++.

    and there's more. adobe lightroom is a combination of c++, obective-c
    and lua. photoshop is c++, objective-c and flash (ugh) which will soon
    be html5.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
  20. Silent Knight

    nospam Guest

    In article <lnmqcu$46i$>, PAS <>
    wrote:

    > > If a phone is lost - left somewhere and picked up by someone else -
    > > the possibility of that person viewing photographs and data has been
    > > mentioned. My question is why all the fuss about this. I'd regret
    > > losing the phone, but there's nothing accessible with my phone that
    > > would cause me any grief.
    > >
    > > There are no photographs on my phone that would embarrass me. I don't
    > > care if you know who my contacts are. I have nothing stored in any
    > > remote site that I would be distressed if someone accessed.

    >
    > I'm pretty much in the same boat as you on this. I have nothing in my phone
    > that would embarrass me, or anything anywhere else. I would be upset if I
    > lost my phone simply because I really like the one I have (LG Optimus G Pro)
    > and don't want to pay for another one.


    do you not use it for anything?

    browser history, email, calendar and various other apps will have all
    sorts of information you might not want leaking out.
    nospam, Jun 16, 2014
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. forced tab

    , Sep 15, 2005, in forum: Firefox
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    604
    Ralph Fox
    Sep 16, 2005
  2. JanC
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,041
  3. Emre Bastuz
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    511
    Emre Bastuz
    Jan 2, 2004
  4. Invalid Address

    Forced video AND forced audio from Universal

    Invalid Address, Jan 8, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    32
    Views:
    2,192
    John Savard
    Jan 18, 2004
  5. jamesstevn
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,812
    jamesstevn
    Mar 10, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page