How To Record a TV Program on a Computer DVD Writer?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Ken Hall, Aug 13, 2005.

  1. Ken Hall

    Ken Hall Guest

    Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    what do I need to be able to do this?"

    My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.

    Ken
     
    Ken Hall, Aug 13, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ken Hall

    Alpha Guest

    "Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >
    > Ken


    Buy a standalone DVD recorder. Why do you need the computer at all for this
    purpose?
     
    Alpha, Aug 13, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ken Hall

    billh Guest

    "Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >
    > Ken


    I bought an ATI TV Tuner card so I could (I thought) make a cheap digital
    recorder. So far I feel it has been a big mistake. I can capture the program
    fine but it needs to be in a playable format for my DVD player which means
    MPEG2 or converted to DVD format.

    MPEG2 files while not FastForward in my 2 players so I can't blast through
    commercials. Converting to DVD format which does allow FF probably takes
    about 30 min of processing time. With either format add another 15 min or
    so to burn the disk.

    A kind soul on this NG recommended VideoReDo for quick and simple editing.
    Works great but it still takes time and if there is a surprise ending you'll
    probably see it while cutting out the commercials.

    Unless somebody can set me straight, my words of wisdom right now are:

    1. Don't be too quick to throw out your VHS recorder if all you want to do
    is catch a TV show.
    2. If you want digital go with the standalone recorder.

    billh
     
    billh, Aug 13, 2005
    #3
  4. First, you'll need to install a video capture card in your computer,
    assuming it doesn't already have one. Then you need to learn about video
    capture software, audio and video codecs, and finally, DVD authoring.
    There's lots of stuff out on the web to help you. Start Googling.... :)

    Regards,

    Margaret

    "Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >
    > Ken
     
    Margaret Wilson, Aug 13, 2005
    #4
  5. Ken Hall

    Mark Lloyd Guest

    On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 22:42:54 -0400, "Margaret Wilson"
    <> wrote:

    >First, you'll need to install a video capture card in your computer,
    >assuming it doesn't already have one. Then you need to learn about video
    >capture software, audio and video codecs, and finally, DVD authoring.
    >There's lots of stuff out on the web to help you. Start Googling.... :)
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Margaret
    >


    Or Go through a networked ReplayTV. I wouldn't tell anybody to buy
    one just for that, but it does work better.

    >"Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    >> even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    >> a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    >> what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >>
    >> My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >>
    >> Ken

    >

    --
    Mark Lloyd
    has a Replay 5xxx
    http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

    "The idea that there is an invisible being who
    created and still runs this old universe is so
    childish, so obviously contrived, that it is hard to
    believe anyone with even a modicum of education can
    still fall for that scam."
     
    Mark Lloyd, Aug 13, 2005
    #5
  6. Ken Hall

    Jack White Guest

    "Alpha" <> wrote:

    >Buy a standalone DVD recorder. Why do you need the computer at all for this
    >purpose?


    I have been thinking about this. I already have a DVR with my cable
    system. I would buy the DVD recorder if I could copy already recorded
    programs from the DVR to the DVD recorder. Also, I have heard that some
    things like PPVs won't let you record to DVD.
     
    Jack White, Aug 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Ken Hall

    Alpha Guest

    "Jack White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Alpha" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Buy a standalone DVD recorder. Why do you need the computer at all for
    >>this
    >>purpose?

    >
    > I have been thinking about this. I already have a DVR with my cable
    > system. I would buy the DVD recorder if I could copy already recorded
    > programs from the DVR to the DVD recorder. Also, I have heard that some
    > things like PPVs won't let you record to DVD.
    >
    >


    There are, of course, DVD Recorders that function as DVRs and have Tivo
    capability.
     
    Alpha, Aug 13, 2005
    #7
  8. Ken Hall

    Martin Guest

    "Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >
    > Ken


    Take a look at www.videohelp.com for loads of useful info and some guides
    too.

    Martin.
     
    Martin, Aug 13, 2005
    #8
  9. Ken Hall

    Mr Blobby Guest

    "Alpha" <> went:

    >
    >"Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    >> even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    >> a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    >> what do I need to be able to do this?"


    i use a pinnacle dc10+. it's been discontinued, but they still turn up
    on ebay, or there will be a more up to date model if you want to buy
    new. a macro scheduler takes care of timed recordings.

    >>
    >> My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.


    a scart to phono adaptor at the vcr end, and three long phono leads (2
    for audio, 1 for video).

    >>
    >> Ken

    >
    >Buy a standalone DVD recorder. Why do you need the computer at all for this
    >purpose?
    >
    >


    because a 2 pass vbr mpg will always look a lot better than something
    that's been encoded in realtime. and because it will be easier to chop
    out adverts and other unwanted gunk.


    --
    warning -- bbc7 and an increasing number of other stereo radio
    stations are broadcast in 1960s style mono on dab digital radio,
    a system that is supposedly "the future of radio".
     
    Mr Blobby, Aug 13, 2005
    #9
  10. Ken Hall

    Ken Hall Guest

    On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 22:42:54 -0400, "Margaret Wilson"
    <> wrote:

    >First, you'll need to install a video capture card in your computer,
    >assuming it doesn't already have one. Then you need to learn about video
    >capture software, audio and video codecs, and finally, DVD authoring.


    Thanks for your reply. Apparently this is a hobby not a task.

    Ken
     
    Ken Hall, Aug 13, 2005
    #10
  11. Ken Hall

    Doug Arnott Guest

    Ken Hall wrote:

    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.


    I bought a new PC at the start of the year to replace my 5 year old one.
    One criteria for me was to do TV recording for DVD creation. To support
    TV to DVD Video in my new PC, the two main components were an ATI All-In-
    Wonder 9600 XT graphics card and a DVD burner. The DVD burner supported
    "-" and "+" formats. The ATI AIW 9600 XT graphics card has a co-axial
    cable input to connect the co-axial TV cable.

    See http://www.ati.com for the ATI AIW series of cards. An adverising
    flyer for a consumer electronics chain had the ATI AIW 9800 Pro for $199
    (cdn) using a mark-down of $200.

    Pinnacle Studio 8 came bundled with the AIW 9600 XT card. Nero Express
    came bundled with the DVD burner.

    Using the default DVD quality settings for the AIW 9600 XT card, I could
    record from the TV into .mpg files, and play those files using Windows
    Media Player. Using Nero Express, I could burn the .mpg files onto a DVD
    data disc.

    In skimming through the price-reduced bin at a computer store, I found
    "Digital Video For Dummies". This book contained descriptions for Apple
    iMovie and Pinnacle Studio. I needed a book such as this to explain the
    terminology and walk me through the work flow.

    I had to download the patch for Pinnacle Studio 8 after registering. (I
    dislike registering.) I experimented with Studio 8, and I was not satis-
    fied with it.

    Nero 6 Ultra Edition with a sticker of "Version 6.6 Now Included" and a
    sale price appeared on the store shelf. This package had NeroVision Ex-
    press, an alternative to Pinnacle Studio 8 for me.

    NeroVision Express has flaws, but I like it better than Pinnacle Studio
    8. One possibility in the future is to try one of the Adobe products.
    With NeroVision Express, I can edit my .mpg files and then burn a DVD
    Video.

    I have gone through a long and steep learning curve to get to the point
    where I have a familar and working process to record a show from TV and
    burn a DVD Video.

    Doug

    PS I have part of my continuing adventure with NeroVision Express 3
    typed up which I should post to get feedback. alt.video.dvd.authoring
    seems like the appropriate newsgroup for such a post.
     
    Doug Arnott, Aug 13, 2005
    #11
  12. "> Doug
    >
    > PS I have part of my continuing adventure with NeroVision Express 3
    > typed up which I should post to get feedback. alt.video.dvd.authoring
    > seems like the appropriate newsgroup for such a post.


    I hope you do post your information...I would like to read it!
     
    Cathy De Viney, Aug 13, 2005
    #12
  13. Ken Hall

    GMAN Guest

    In article <Y1bLe.16333$>, "billh" <> wrote:
    >
    >"Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    >> even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    >> a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    >> what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >>
    >> My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >>
    >> Ken

    >
    >I bought an ATI TV Tuner card so I could (I thought) make a cheap digital
    >recorder. So far I feel it has been a big mistake. I can capture the program
    >fine but it needs to be in a playable format for my DVD player which means
    >MPEG2 or converted to DVD format.
    >
    >MPEG2 files while not FastForward in my 2 players so I can't blast through
    >commercials. Converting to DVD format which does allow FF probably takes
    >about 30 min of processing time. With either format add another 15 min or
    >so to burn the disk.
    >
    >A kind soul on this NG recommended VideoReDo for quick and simple editing.
    >Works great but it still takes time and if there is a surprise ending you'll
    >probably see it while cutting out the commercials.
    >
    >Unless somebody can set me straight, my words of wisdom right now are:
    >
    >1. Don't be too quick to throw out your VHS recorder if all you want to do
    >is catch a TV show.


    TIVO

    >2. If you want digital go with the standalone recorder.


    DirecTV TIVO + Standalone DVD recorder

    >
    >billh
    >
    >
     
    GMAN, Aug 13, 2005
    #13
  14. Ken Hall

    Dave S Guest

    Doug Arnott wrote:
    > Nero 6 Ultra Edition with a sticker of "Version 6.6 Now Included" and a
    > sale price appeared on the store shelf. This package had NeroVision Ex-
    > press, an alternative to Pinnacle Studio 8 for me.
    >
    > NeroVision Express has flaws, but I like it better than Pinnacle Studio
    > 8. One possibility in the future is to try one of the Adobe products.
    > With NeroVision Express, I can edit my .mpg files and then burn a DVD
    > Video.


    I hope you have better luck with it than I did. It came with the AOpen
    DVD burner I bought. I tried several times to create a DVD~R with it,
    and ran into the roadblock of needing to buy plug-ins for it, in order
    to get audio.

    I returned the AOpen when I found it wouldn't burn DL DVD-Rs (that's the
    flavour my Pioneer DVD player requires) and bought an external Plextor
    PX-716UF. I use VideoReDo to edit and 1Click DVD Copy to burn.

    Dave S.
     
    Dave S, Aug 13, 2005
    #14
  15. In addition to the previously stated methods of recording broadcast TV
    to DVD, another approach I'm guessing (not having done this ever)
    might be:

    OBTAIN TV SIGNAL:
    Purchase AVerMedia (or equivalent) PC TV tuner & software
    Attach cable or antenna to AVerMedia or equivalent external TV tuner
    Attach external TV tuner to computer

    CAPTURE TV PROGRAM TO DISK:
    Use supplied software to tune into the desired TV broadcast station
    Capture video input to AVI on disk using Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equiv.)
    EDIT (if desired)
    Edit out commercials with Pinnacle Studio 9 or equivalent

    CONVERT TO DVD:
    Save as MPEG-2 from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    Make DVD Movie from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)

    BURN TO DVD:
    Burn the resultant DVD with Nero or equivalent

    CAVEAT:
    I've never done this but this approach seems to make sense to me. It
    would be nice if someone who has actually done this (probably less
    than 1/2 of 1% of the posters on this NG) can comment whether this
    approach will work or not.
     
    Sondra R. Wilson, Aug 13, 2005
    #15
  16. Ken Hall

    abc Guest

    On Sat, 13 Aug 2005 19:30:49 GMT, Sondra R. Wilson
    <> wrote:

    >In addition to the previously stated methods of recording broadcast TV
    >to DVD, another approach I'm guessing (not having done this ever)
    >might be:
    >
    >OBTAIN TV SIGNAL:
    >Purchase AVerMedia (or equivalent) PC TV tuner & software
    >Attach cable or antenna to AVerMedia or equivalent external TV tuner
    >Attach external TV tuner to computer
    >
    >CAPTURE TV PROGRAM TO DISK:
    >Use supplied software to tune into the desired TV broadcast station
    >Capture video input to AVI on disk using Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equiv.)
    >EDIT (if desired)
    >Edit out commercials with Pinnacle Studio 9 or equivalent
    >
    >CONVERT TO DVD:
    >Save as MPEG-2 from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    >Make DVD Movie from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    >
    >BURN TO DVD:
    >Burn the resultant DVD with Nero or equivalent
    >
    >CAVEAT:
    >I've never done this but this approach seems to make sense to me. It
    >would be nice if someone who has actually done this (probably less
    >than 1/2 of 1% of the posters on this NG) can comment whether this
    >approach will work or not.


    I've recorded a lot of DVDs, but you didn't get the rest of my answer
    because of the excessive CROSSPOSTING!
     
    abc, Aug 13, 2005
    #16
  17. Wow, for never having done it, you sure do know a lot. :) I'm one of your
    statistics, having built three HTPCs before tiring of all the time spent
    tweaking, quieting, and troubleshooting them every time one would burp.
    After all, they are computers, and they do need periodic repair. HTPCs are
    particularly fussy, as certain Windows updates or driver updates sometimes
    interfered with color, or audio, etc. I ran three of these machines in my
    networked home for a little over a year. The last problem I had was that my
    main HTPC started picking up a low-pitched buzz on recordings from my
    most-recorded channel. That was about the time DNNA started selling off RTV
    5040s cheap, so I bought one, then a second, and in their recent 5504
    sell-off, I bought one of those.

    Being a computer networking professional and never having worked with
    audio/video codecs, etc., I found it quite fun and very interesting to learn
    all this stuff. I used ShowShifter software on my HTPCs, and I tried three
    different video capture cards: AverMedia, Asus and Prolink. If I were to do
    it again, I'd probably try one of the ATI All-in-Wonder cards that someone
    else mentioned. Here are some things that I learned.

    1. The capture software included with the cards is usually buggy, may not
    support recording in MPEG2 format, so plan on trying out third party apps.
    ShowShifter worked well for me, but there are others that offer some type of
    TV guide. (ShowShifter may do this now, too.) There's a second class of
    video capture card which offers hardware MPEG2 recording. These I have not
    tried, though I've heard they work great with SageTV.

    2. Not all third-party apps are compatible with third party software, so
    read the reviews of the cards you're looking at, and make sure you can try
    the software before you buy. For example, NeroVision Express could get
    video but no audio from all three of the tuner cards I used.

    3. Not all cards are created equal. The AverMedia was the best, having a
    balanced audio output. The Asus sounded tinny, and the "breakout box" that
    it came with picked up video from the svideo and RCA inputs, but the audio
    inputs were dead. (This meant the card was fine for recording TV, but I
    couldn't convert my VHS movies using this card, since it needed the breakout
    box.) The audio output on the Prolink was so loud it caused feedback in
    recordings. The vendor promised new drivers and never produced them during
    the year I owned the card. The card itself had the needed inputs, so I was
    able to convert my VHS movies using this card. But I had to dial back the
    audio on the output end.

    4. Once you've got your TV show or movie captured, then you'll need to
    edit it and convert it to MPEG2 if your software doesn't record in MPEG2.
    VirtualDub works well for non-MPEG2 files and is free. Since I used mostly
    DivX and Xvid codecs, VirtualDub worked great for me. I briefly tried
    playing with TMPGenc to create MPEG2 files but decided I didn't want to be
    bothered. Instead I purchased a DivX-certified DVD player and burned my
    Divx files directly to DVD. They play great, BTW.

    5. Now that I own RTVs (and a DVArchive box), I simply transfer the shows
    & movies to DVArchive, edit them using Womble's MPEG Video Wizard. (I would
    have tried VideoRedo, but TMK it didn't exist when I was doing my research
    and made my purchase. MVW works great BTW.) Then I use TMPGEnc's DVD
    Author to author and sometimes burn a DVD. DVD Author 1.6 supports dual
    layer, too. I like this program a lot. It offers a fair number of menuing
    options (or no menu at all, which I like for movies). Further, it won't
    reencode a DVD-compliant MPEG2 file, and you don't have to have audio and
    video in separate files. Sometimes I do the final burning with Nero, which
    works fine too, just depends on how I feel.

    Having gone both the HTPC and RTV route, I'd say go RTV. Capture quality is
    better with the RTV, you have an almost-DVD-compliant MPEG2 in hand when
    done, and the editing tools (like MVW and VideoRedo) are actual frame
    editors.

    Anyway, that's my experience. Take from it what you will. And Ken, yes, it
    is a hobby rather than a task. :)

    Regards,

    Margaret

    "Sondra R. Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > In addition to the previously stated methods of recording broadcast TV
    > to DVD, another approach I'm guessing (not having done this ever)
    > might be:
    >
    > OBTAIN TV SIGNAL:
    > Purchase AVerMedia (or equivalent) PC TV tuner & software
    > Attach cable or antenna to AVerMedia or equivalent external TV tuner
    > Attach external TV tuner to computer
    >
    > CAPTURE TV PROGRAM TO DISK:
    > Use supplied software to tune into the desired TV broadcast station
    > Capture video input to AVI on disk using Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equiv.)
    > EDIT (if desired)
    > Edit out commercials with Pinnacle Studio 9 or equivalent
    >
    > CONVERT TO DVD:
    > Save as MPEG-2 from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    > Make DVD Movie from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    >
    > BURN TO DVD:
    > Burn the resultant DVD with Nero or equivalent
    >
    > CAVEAT:
    > I've never done this but this approach seems to make sense to me. It
    > would be nice if someone who has actually done this (probably less
    > than 1/2 of 1% of the posters on this NG) can comment whether this
    > approach will work or not.
     
    Margaret Wilson, Aug 13, 2005
    #17
  18. Here's a web site that I learned a lot from while doing my initial research:

    http://www.tv-cards.com/

    And don't forget the AVS Forums. There's an HTPC forum there IIRC.

    Regards,

    Margaret

    "Margaret Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Wow, for never having done it, you sure do know a lot. :) I'm one of
    > your statistics, having built three HTPCs before tiring of all the time
    > spent tweaking, quieting, and troubleshooting them every time one would
    > burp. After all, they are computers, and they do need periodic repair.
    > HTPCs are particularly fussy, as certain Windows updates or driver updates
    > sometimes interfered with color, or audio, etc. I ran three of these
    > machines in my networked home for a little over a year. The last problem
    > I had was that my main HTPC started picking up a low-pitched buzz on
    > recordings from my most-recorded channel. That was about the time DNNA
    > started selling off RTV 5040s cheap, so I bought one, then a second, and
    > in their recent 5504 sell-off, I bought one of those.
    >
    > Being a computer networking professional and never having worked with
    > audio/video codecs, etc., I found it quite fun and very interesting to
    > learn all this stuff. I used ShowShifter software on my HTPCs, and I
    > tried three different video capture cards: AverMedia, Asus and Prolink.
    > If I were to do it again, I'd probably try one of the ATI All-in-Wonder
    > cards that someone else mentioned. Here are some things that I learned.
    >
    > 1. The capture software included with the cards is usually buggy, may
    > not support recording in MPEG2 format, so plan on trying out third party
    > apps. ShowShifter worked well for me, but there are others that offer some
    > type of TV guide. (ShowShifter may do this now, too.) There's a second
    > class of video capture card which offers hardware MPEG2 recording. These
    > I have not tried, though I've heard they work great with SageTV.
    >
    > 2. Not all third-party apps are compatible with third party software,
    > so read the reviews of the cards you're looking at, and make sure you can
    > try the software before you buy. For example, NeroVision Express could
    > get video but no audio from all three of the tuner cards I used.
    >
    > 3. Not all cards are created equal. The AverMedia was the best, having
    > a balanced audio output. The Asus sounded tinny, and the "breakout box"
    > that it came with picked up video from the svideo and RCA inputs, but the
    > audio inputs were dead. (This meant the card was fine for recording TV,
    > but I couldn't convert my VHS movies using this card, since it needed the
    > breakout box.) The audio output on the Prolink was so loud it caused
    > feedback in recordings. The vendor promised new drivers and never
    > produced them during the year I owned the card. The card itself had the
    > needed inputs, so I was able to convert my VHS movies using this card.
    > But I had to dial back the audio on the output end.
    >
    > 4. Once you've got your TV show or movie captured, then you'll need to
    > edit it and convert it to MPEG2 if your software doesn't record in MPEG2.
    > VirtualDub works well for non-MPEG2 files and is free. Since I used
    > mostly DivX and Xvid codecs, VirtualDub worked great for me. I briefly
    > tried playing with TMPGenc to create MPEG2 files but decided I didn't want
    > to be bothered. Instead I purchased a DivX-certified DVD player and
    > burned my Divx files directly to DVD. They play great, BTW.
    >
    > 5. Now that I own RTVs (and a DVArchive box), I simply transfer the
    > shows & movies to DVArchive, edit them using Womble's MPEG Video Wizard.
    > (I would have tried VideoRedo, but TMK it didn't exist when I was doing my
    > research and made my purchase. MVW works great BTW.) Then I use
    > TMPGEnc's DVD Author to author and sometimes burn a DVD. DVD Author 1.6
    > supports dual layer, too. I like this program a lot. It offers a fair
    > number of menuing options (or no menu at all, which I like for movies).
    > Further, it won't reencode a DVD-compliant MPEG2 file, and you don't have
    > to have audio and video in separate files. Sometimes I do the final
    > burning with Nero, which works fine too, just depends on how I feel.
    >
    > Having gone both the HTPC and RTV route, I'd say go RTV. Capture quality
    > is better with the RTV, you have an almost-DVD-compliant MPEG2 in hand
    > when done, and the editing tools (like MVW and VideoRedo) are actual frame
    > editors.
    >
    > Anyway, that's my experience. Take from it what you will. And Ken, yes,
    > it is a hobby rather than a task. :)
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Margaret
    >
    > "Sondra R. Wilson" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> In addition to the previously stated methods of recording broadcast TV
    >> to DVD, another approach I'm guessing (not having done this ever)
    >> might be:
    >>
    >> OBTAIN TV SIGNAL:
    >> Purchase AVerMedia (or equivalent) PC TV tuner & software
    >> Attach cable or antenna to AVerMedia or equivalent external TV tuner
    >> Attach external TV tuner to computer
    >>
    >> CAPTURE TV PROGRAM TO DISK:
    >> Use supplied software to tune into the desired TV broadcast station
    >> Capture video input to AVI on disk using Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equiv.)
    >> EDIT (if desired)
    >> Edit out commercials with Pinnacle Studio 9 or equivalent
    >>
    >> CONVERT TO DVD:
    >> Save as MPEG-2 from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    >> Make DVD Movie from Pinnacle Studio 9 (or equivalent)
    >>
    >> BURN TO DVD:
    >> Burn the resultant DVD with Nero or equivalent
    >>
    >> CAVEAT:
    >> I've never done this but this approach seems to make sense to me. It
    >> would be nice if someone who has actually done this (probably less
    >> than 1/2 of 1% of the posters on this NG) can comment whether this
    >> approach will work or not.

    >
    >
     
    Margaret Wilson, Aug 13, 2005
    #18
  19. Ken Hall

    Netmask Guest

    "Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    even a live TV signal) to my computer"
    Answer - Yes
    You will need a mpeg capture card installed in your computer.
    That's the simple answer to your question - there are many alternative
    routes you could travel.

    1. A DVD recorder, just like a VCR in many respects - feed in an analog
    signal and away you go - but you need to research the many models and
    quirks.

    2. Think about a standard definition set top box like the Topfield 5000 with
    it's built in hard disk, you can record 2 separate TV stations at the same
    time and play back something you had recorded previously all at the same
    time. You can transfer the recorded signal via a USB link to your computer
    to author and burn DVD's. 10 metres between tuner and computer is can be
    achieved with a an active USB 2 lead (I'm running 15 metres at the moment
    with 2 active leads!)

    3. You could install a TV tuner in your computer (the cheapest option) and
    simply record what you want.
    Go to www.videohelp.com also check out the Topfield Australian site and
    browse through the forum - there is also a British site and the Korean head
    office site to look at
    http://www.topfield-australia.com.au/product.asp?SKU=TF5000PVRT

    Lots of options


    "Ken Hall" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Can I connect a TV signal from a VCR or a TV hard disk recorder (or
    > even a live TV signal) to my computer, so that I can copy a program to
    > a my computer's DVD writer which will play in a TV DVD player? If so,
    > what do I need to be able to do this?"
    >
    > My TV is separated from my computer by a hallway and about 30 feet.
    >
    > Ken
     
    Netmask, Aug 14, 2005
    #19
  20. Ken Hall

    Alpha Guest

    "Netmask" <> wrote in message
    news:IXyLe.83927$...


    Your suggestions are mostly irrelevant for the original poster, who lives in
    Houston. Bi-directional interfaces (firewire or USB) have been eliminated
    here in agreement with the commercial video and tv industry. (many boxes
    have connectors but they have been disabled).
     
    Alpha, Aug 14, 2005
    #20
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