How to price digital files, rather than prints...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by kasterborus@yahoo.com, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I photographed a family event recently and I've sold about 60 prints on
    line to the various attendees.

    Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album.

    I really don't know how much to charge for the "right to print". On the
    one hand I want to keep him as a client, but on the other I don't want
    the relatives who have purchased prints to find out that I could have
    sold them the jpg files.

    Also I try hard to get good quality Fuji and Kodak prints, whereas
    mypublisher.com uses a 4 color ink process, with no mention of color
    profiles, or quality. I think the albums are priced around $35 for 120
    pictures.

    Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.

    I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.

    Any ideas?

    Dave
     
    , Nov 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I photographed a family event recently and I've sold about 60 prints on
    > line to the various attendees.
    >
    > Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    > use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album.
    >
    > I really don't know how much to charge for the "right to print". On the
    > one hand I want to keep him as a client, but on the other I don't want
    > the relatives who have purchased prints to find out that I could have
    > sold them the jpg files.
    >
    > Also I try hard to get good quality Fuji and Kodak prints, whereas
    > mypublisher.com uses a 4 color ink process, with no mention of color
    > profiles, or quality. I think the albums are priced around $35 for 120
    > pictures.
    >
    > Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    > files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.
    >
    > I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.


    Nor am I but I'll share my gut feeling. Do as you stated and wait 12 months
    before offering this option or do not offer it at all.
     
    Charles Schuler, Nov 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bill Funk Guest

    On 27 Nov 2005 12:42:21 -0800, wrote:

    >I photographed a family event recently and I've sold about 60 prints on
    >line to the various attendees.
    >
    >Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    >use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album.
    >
    >I really don't know how much to charge for the "right to print". On the
    >one hand I want to keep him as a client, but on the other I don't want
    >the relatives who have purchased prints to find out that I could have
    >sold them the jpg files.
    >
    >Also I try hard to get good quality Fuji and Kodak prints, whereas
    >mypublisher.com uses a 4 color ink process, with no mention of color
    >profiles, or quality. I think the albums are priced around $35 for 120
    >pictures.
    >
    >Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    >files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.
    >
    >I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.
    >
    >Any ideas?
    >
    >Dave


    Personal opinion...
    Family means northing when it comes to your profession.
    Charge them the same as you would any other customer, because that's
    what they seem to be in this case: customers.
    It's hard, sometimes, but they will respect your professionalism more.

    --
    Bill Funk
    Replace "g" with "a"
    funktionality.blogspot.com
     
    Bill Funk, Nov 27, 2005
    #3
  4. On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 15:01:56 -0700, in rec.photo.digital Bill Funk
    <> wrote:


    >Personal opinion...
    >Family means northing when it comes to your profession.
    >Charge them the same as you would any other customer, because that's
    >what they seem to be in this case: customers.
    >It's hard, sometimes, but they will respect your professionalism more.


    I think if you reread the OP, he means a "family" event in general, not his
    own family. I could be wrong though.
    --
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Nov 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Paul Rubin Guest

    writes:
    > Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    > use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album....
    > Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    > files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.
    >
    > I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.


    If the online photo album means low res files for display on the web,
    I'd say go ahead and let them do it at no extra charge. You can still
    sell prints that need higher res. If anything, the online shots might
    lead to your selling MORE prints.

    If they want high res files online and you think you will lose actual
    revenue from them, calculate a fair estimate of the amount, explain it
    to the client, and ask for a bit less than that (the discount is
    because you get it up front, you don't have to deal with making prints
    later and sending them out, and because it will make the client a bit
    happier and likelier to keep coming back). Alternatively, figure out
    what you think a good flat hourly rate is for shooting the event,
    signing over or releasing all rights, and charge that amount.

    Don't feel too emotionally attached to the images just because you're
    the one who stood behind the camera and pressed the button when they
    were made. It's just business and you're just hired help. You might
    normally structure your deals so you get a certain amount of money up
    front and another amount (not precisely known in advance but usually
    predictable in general terms) fromt print sales after the the event;
    but if the client prefers some other structure, the main thing is to
    make sure you get about the same total amount of money under the new
    structure, rather than quibbling over who gets what specific rights to
    do what. If you can negotiate the amounts so that the total money is
    good, go along with whatever structure the client wants.
     
    Paul Rubin, Nov 27, 2005
    #5
  6. wrote:
    >I photographed a family event recently and I've sold about 60 prints on
    > line to the various attendees.
    >
    > Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    > use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album.
    >
    > I really don't know how much to charge for the "right to print". On
    > the one hand I want to keep him as a client, but on the other I don't
    > want the relatives who have purchased prints to find out that I could
    > have sold them the jpg files.
    >
    > Also I try hard to get good quality Fuji and Kodak prints, whereas
    > mypublisher.com uses a 4 color ink process, with no mention of color
    > profiles, or quality. I think the albums are priced around $35 for 120
    > pictures.
    >
    > Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    > files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.
    >
    > I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Dave


    Once you are really a professional, you need to establish the rules and
    stick to them. The customer needs to know what the rules are when the
    commission you to start with and there should be no changes to the rules.
    The rules should be spelled out in the contract. The "usually I wait for 12
    months" does not sound good. Either you do or your don't.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Nov 28, 2005
    #6
  7. writes:

    > I photographed a family event recently and I've sold about 60 prints on
    > line to the various attendees.
    >
    > Today the client asked me if I could supply digital files so he could
    > use www.mypublisher.com to create a photo album.
    >
    > I really don't know how much to charge for the "right to print". On the
    > one hand I want to keep him as a client, but on the other I don't want
    > the relatives who have purchased prints to find out that I could have
    > sold them the jpg files.
    >
    > Also I try hard to get good quality Fuji and Kodak prints, whereas
    > mypublisher.com uses a 4 color ink process, with no mention of color
    > profiles, or quality. I think the albums are priced around $35 for 120
    > pictures.
    >
    > Bottom line - I need to charge $150 minimum for a complete set of JPG
    > files - but usually I wait for 12 months before offering this option.
    >
    > I'm really not sure how to deal with this situation.
    >
    > Any ideas?


    Don't lose track of the fact that what he wants seems to be something
    you're not offering directly. So the one-year delay probably doesn't
    serve your customer's needs very well. Consider offering
    custom-printed albums as part of your packages at your prices.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Nov 28, 2005
    #7
  8. Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 18:02:45 -0500, "Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN
    SIG!)" <> wrote:

    >On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 15:01:56 -0700, in rec.photo.digital Bill Funk
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Personal opinion...
    >>Family means northing when it comes to your profession.
    >>Charge them the same as you would any other customer, because that's
    >>what they seem to be in this case: customers.
    >>It's hard, sometimes, but they will respect your professionalism more.

    >
    >I think if you reread the OP, he means a "family" event in general, not his
    >own family. I could be wrong though.


    Maybe. I figure a "family" event has family there.
    Possibly others, but why would there be a problem there with pricing?
    They expect special accomodation because they were *there*?

    --
    Bill Funk
    Replace "g" with "a"
    funktionality.blogspot.com
     
    Bill Funk, Nov 28, 2005
    #8
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