How to make a backup drive bootable

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jeff G, Jan 2, 2005.

  1. Jeff G

    Jeff G Guest

    I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT
    scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one
    who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.

    My OS is Win XP Pro. I have WD Digital Lifeguard, and can d/l Seagate
    Discwizard if need be.

    I have two ATA HDs in my system now, and a third in a box waiting to be
    installed. I'd like to replace my old slave with the third HD. But
    before doing so, I'd like to verify that I can plug in my old slave as
    the master and boot the computer with it. Various people have asked if
    I've used fdisk. The answer is no. I know very little about DOS. I
    went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS. I also
    read the Microsoft article on fdisk. When I asked my computer for a
    Command prompt and switched directories to C:/, it would not let me use
    the fdisk command. Others have asked about my MBR. I copied the
    contents of my master to my slave with WD Digital Lifeguard. When I
    did, I assumed it would have copied everything on my master. Perhaps it
    didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to check and see if my MBR
    was on my slave. Another person said it was simple - just go in and
    change the BIOS. I changed my BIOS so my primary boot device was HDD-1
    instead of HDD-0 and the computer booted fine. Then on a hunch I
    changed the primary boot device to HDD-2, and the computer still booted
    normally. So that was no answer.

    Can anyone give me a walk-through on what to do??? I've spent the last
    two days working on this with no success. I have 25 GB of information,
    data, etc. on my HD, so I really don't want to screw up and have to
    start from square one again by reinstalling my OS on my master and going
    from there.

    And to think - I actually thought this would be easy when I decided to
    purchase the new HD. Now I'm taking double doses of Fioricet and
    drinking and calling depression help lines because I am so depressed and
    frustrated over the whole situation. I suppose it doesn't matter if it
    takes me a week to get the answer, but being an extreme pessimist, I
    wouldn't surprise me if my drive crashed in the next hour. As we
    pessimists say, just when things look there bleakest, they can still get
    worse.

    Thank you to anybody with time and energy to help me. Thank you for
    even taking the time to read all of this.
     
    Jeff G, Jan 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jeff G

    why? Guest

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 23:55:28 GMT, Jeff G wrote:

    >I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    >received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT


    So you start another thread , longer this time an epic to fall asleep
    over?

    >scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    >maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one


    One of the posts mentioned Norton Ghost, use that. It was the 1st reply
    from Unk.

    >who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    >Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.


    Possibly the length of the post.

    >My OS is Win XP Pro. I have WD Digital Lifeguard, and can d/l Seagate
    >Discwizard if need be.


    Don't those tools depend on having WD or Seagate disks, I suspect if you
    have WD drives the Seagate tool won't run.

    >I have two ATA HDs in my system now, and a third in a box waiting to be
    >installed. I'd like to replace my old slave with the third HD. But
    >before doing so, I'd like to verify that I can plug in my old slave as
    >the master and boot the computer with it. Various people have asked if
    >I've used fdisk. The answer is no. I know very little about DOS. I
    >went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS. I also


    www.bootdisk.com , lots of 'DOS' boot disks, download an image file and
    follow the instructions.

    >read the Microsoft article on fdisk. When I asked my computer for a
    >Command prompt and switched directories to C:/, it would not let me use


    It's c:\

    >the fdisk command. Others have asked about my MBR. I copied the


    Did you perhaps launch a command prompt after starting Windows?

    If so, let's see. Boot into Windows, running operating systems protects
    partition / mbr from editing. What I then do is try and fdisk , hmmmm OS
    won't let me.

    >contents of my master to my slave with . When I


    You were told a copy (of the files ) isn't the same. To be a boot disk
    the MBR, Partition data etc. have to be a (exact) duplicate.

    >did, I assumed it would have copied everything on my master. Perhaps it
    >didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to check and see if my MBR
    >was on my slave. Another person said it was simple - just go in and
    >change the BIOS. I changed my BIOS so my primary boot device was HDD-1
    >instead of HDD-0 and the computer booted fine. Then on a hunch I
    >changed the primary boot device to HDD-2, and the computer still booted
    >normally. So that was no answer.


    The simple way is don't change any BIOS settings, unplug existing disks
    from data / power. Take the disk you just copied and make it the master.

    If the image / copy is exact then the system boots as normal.


    >Can anyone give me a walk-through on what to do??? I've spent the last
    >two days working on this with no success. I have 25 GB of information,


    As told already Norton Ghost.

    >data, etc. on my HD, so I really don't want to screw up and have to
    >start from square one again by reinstalling my OS on my master and going
    >from there.


    Use Norton Ghost and backup to CDR/DVDR.

    >And to think - I actually thought this would be easy when I decided to
    >purchase the new HD. Now I'm taking double doses of Fioricet and


    It is easy.

    >drinking and calling depression help lines because I am so depressed and
    >frustrated over the whole situation. I suppose it doesn't matter if it
    >takes me a week to get the answer, but being an extreme pessimist, I


    You included the last bit because?

    >wouldn't surprise me if my drive crashed in the next hour. As we
    >pessimists say, just when things look there bleakest, they can still get
    >worse.


    You included the last bit because?

    >Thank you to anybody with time and energy to help me. Thank you for
    >even taking the time to read all of this.


    It did go on a bit, you could have stopped at -
    "I would like to make a bootable backup of my existing hardisk "

    Me
     
    why?, Jan 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jeff G

    Jeff G Guest

    why? wrote:
    > On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 23:55:28 GMT, Jeff G wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    >>received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT

    >
    >
    > So you start another thread , longer this time an epic to fall asleep
    > over?
    >
    >
    >>scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    >>maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one

    >
    >
    > One of the posts mentioned Norton Ghost, use that. It was the 1st reply
    > from Unk.
    >
    >
    >>who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    >>Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.

    >
    >
    > Possibly the length of the post.
    >
    >
    >>My OS is Win XP Pro. I have WD Digital Lifeguard, and can d/l Seagate
    >>Discwizard if need be.

    >
    >
    > Don't those tools depend on having WD or Seagate disks, I suspect if you
    > have WD drives the Seagate tool won't run.
    >
    >
    >>I have two ATA HDs in my system now, and a third in a box waiting to be
    >>installed. I'd like to replace my old slave with the third HD. But
    >>before doing so, I'd like to verify that I can plug in my old slave as
    >>the master and boot the computer with it. Various people have asked if
    >>I've used fdisk. The answer is no. I know very little about DOS. I
    >>went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS. I also

    >
    >
    > www.bootdisk.com , lots of 'DOS' boot disks, download an image file and
    > follow the instructions.
    >
    >
    >>read the Microsoft article on fdisk. When I asked my computer for a
    >>Command prompt and switched directories to C:/, it would not let me use

    >
    >
    > It's c:\
    >
    >
    >>the fdisk command. Others have asked about my MBR. I copied the

    >
    >
    > Did you perhaps launch a command prompt after starting Windows?
    >
    > If so, let's see. Boot into Windows, running operating systems protects
    > partition / mbr from editing. What I then do is try and fdisk , hmmmm OS
    > won't let me.
    >
    >
    >>contents of my master to my slave with . When I

    >
    >
    > You were told a copy (of the files ) isn't the same. To be a boot disk
    > the MBR, Partition data etc. have to be a (exact) duplicate.
    >
    >
    >>did, I assumed it would have copied everything on my master. Perhaps it
    >>didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to check and see if my MBR
    >>was on my slave. Another person said it was simple - just go in and
    >>change the BIOS. I changed my BIOS so my primary boot device was HDD-1
    >>instead of HDD-0 and the computer booted fine. Then on a hunch I
    >>changed the primary boot device to HDD-2, and the computer still booted
    >>normally. So that was no answer.

    >
    >
    > The simple way is don't change any BIOS settings, unplug existing disks
    > from data / power. Take the disk you just copied and make it the master.
    >
    > If the image / copy is exact then the system boots as normal.
    >
    >
    >
    >>Can anyone give me a walk-through on what to do??? I've spent the last
    >>two days working on this with no success. I have 25 GB of information,

    >
    >
    > As told already Norton Ghost.
    >
    >
    >>data, etc. on my HD, so I really don't want to screw up and have to
    >>start from square one again by reinstalling my OS on my master and going

    >
    >>from there.

    >
    > Use Norton Ghost and backup to CDR/DVDR.
    >
    >
    >>And to think - I actually thought this would be easy when I decided to
    >>purchase the new HD. Now I'm taking double doses of Fioricet and

    >
    >
    > It is easy.
    >
    >
    >>drinking and calling depression help lines because I am so depressed and
    >>frustrated over the whole situation. I suppose it doesn't matter if it
    >>takes me a week to get the answer, but being an extreme pessimist, I

    >
    >
    > You included the last bit because?
    >
    >
    >>wouldn't surprise me if my drive crashed in the next hour. As we
    >>pessimists say, just when things look there bleakest, they can still get
    >>worse.

    >
    >
    > You included the last bit because?
    >
    >
    >>Thank you to anybody with time and energy to help me. Thank you for
    >>even taking the time to read all of this.

    >
    >
    > It did go on a bit, you could have stopped at -
    > "I would like to make a bootable backup of my existing hardisk "
    >
    > Me

    Thank you ever so much for the helpful response. And I was thinking
    someone might get the message and actually tell me what to do (in a
    useful manner).

    Do unto they neighbor as you would have them do unto you.
     
    Jeff G, Jan 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Jeff G

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Jeff G" <> wrote in message
    news:QR%Bd.609184$wV.545736@attbi_s54...
    |I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    | received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT
    | scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    | maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one
    | who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    | Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.
    |
    | My OS is Win XP Pro. I have WD Digital Lifeguard, and can d/l Seagate
    | Discwizard if need be.
    |
    | I have two ATA HDs in my system now, and a third in a box waiting to be
    | installed. I'd like to replace my old slave with the third HD. But
    | before doing so, I'd like to verify that I can plug in my old slave as
    | the master and boot the computer with it. Various people have asked if
    | I've used fdisk. The answer is no. I know very little about DOS. I
    | went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS. I also
    | read the Microsoft article on fdisk. When I asked my computer for a
    | Command prompt and switched directories to C:/, it would not let me use
    | the fdisk command. Others have asked about my MBR. I copied the
    | contents of my master to my slave with WD Digital Lifeguard. When I
    | did, I assumed it would have copied everything on my master. Perhaps it
    | didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to check and see if my MBR
    | was on my slave. Another person said it was simple - just go in and
    | change the BIOS. I changed my BIOS so my primary boot device was HDD-1
    | instead of HDD-0 and the computer booted fine. Then on a hunch I
    | changed the primary boot device to HDD-2, and the computer still booted
    | normally. So that was no answer.
    |
    | Can anyone give me a walk-through on what to do??? I've spent the last
    | two days working on this with no success. I have 25 GB of information,
    | data, etc. on my HD, so I really don't want to screw up and have to
    | start from square one again by reinstalling my OS on my master and going
    | from there.

    Forget fdisk with XP. You don't need it.

    The MBR is the "master boot record", and yes, using the "copy partition"
    feature of WD's software does include the MBR.

    How do you *know* the copy you made with WD's Data Lifeguard doesn't boot?
    Did you physically change the cables and jumpers and such, removing the
    original drive? (Just changing the boot drive info in some BIOSs will not
    effectively boot from the other drive.)
     
    Toolman Tim, Jan 3, 2005
    #4
  5. Jeff G

    why? Guest

    On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 03:18:50 GMT, Jeff G wrote:

    Something away at the bottom of the post, repeating the 103 lines,
    adding only 5 newlines and many blanks, could learn about using <snip>

    >why? wrote:
    >> On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 23:55:28 GMT, Jeff G wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    >>>received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT

    >>
    >>
    >> So you start another thread , longer this time an epic to fall asleep
    >> over?


    <snip>

    >> It did go on a bit, you could have stopped at -
    >> "I would like to make a bootable backup of my existing hardisk "
    >>
    >> Me

    >Thank you ever so much for the helpful response. And I was thinking
    >someone might get the message and actually tell me what to do (in a
    >useful manner).


    Exact instructions may not help, you appear to not be able to read.

    Try this ->>>>
    Buy a copy of Norton Ghost as you have been told several times.

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Jan 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Jeff G

    Samantha Guest

    "Jeff G" <> wrote in message
    news:QR%Bd.609184$wV.545736@attbi_s54...
    >I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    >received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT scores,
    >degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that maybe the
    >advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one who's wrong.
    >I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, & Computer Hope, and
    >none of the responses have been of any help.


    etc etc

    ******************************************************************************

    Your problems seems a little complex,

    however I use Ghost all the time.

    I make Bootable and non bootable Images of my

    partitions and drives all the time.

    The trick is that you need to be Norton Ghost LITERATE.

    Being that the case, your problem should be easy to solve.

    If I have misunderstood your dilemma,I apologize and please disregard my
    post.


    Samantha
     
    Samantha, Jan 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Jeff G

    dadiOH Guest

    Jeff G wrote:

    > I know very little about DOS.
    > I went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS.


    1. Boot from a boot floppy

    2. Whatever key (F8?) at POST that gives you the boot menu on your
    computer

    3. Start
    Run
    MSCONFIG
    General tab
    Advanced
    Tick "Enable start up menu"

    The #3 method is for Win98, no idea if XP has something similar.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.05...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Jan 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Jeff G

    dadiOH Guest

    Jeff G wrote:
    > I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    > received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT
    > scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    > maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one
    > who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    > Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.


    Well, so much for IQ, SAT scores and degrees...

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.05...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Jan 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Jeff G

    dadiOH Guest

    Jeff G wrote:

    > Others have asked about my MBR. I
    > copied the contents of my master to my slave with WD Digital
    > Lifeguard. When I did, I assumed it would have copied everything on
    > my master. Perhaps it didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to
    > check and see if my MBR was on my slave.


    If it was it would boot. If you had the drive physically installed
    correctly.
    ________________

    Perhaps it would help you to know what the "MBR" is...

    Have you ever wondered *how* a computer starts? Well it does so because
    there is a "bootstrap loader" in non-volatile memory....built into the
    BIOS. That loader looks at each bootup device (floppy, hard drives, CD
    drive) you have enabled in the order you have enabled them for some code
    on the floppy/HD/CD drive in a particular location on that device's
    media.

    If the necessary code isn't found on the first enabled device the second
    is checked. If not there, then the next enabled device is checked.

    When and if found, the code is loaded into RAM, looks up the partition
    table on the media to determine which partition is to be used and then
    loads more code from the boot sector of that partion which then loads
    the operating system. On a Windows hard drive, that initial bit of code
    is called the "MBR" (master boot record).

    That means no MBR = no boot. It also means that a disc *with* a MBR but
    *without* an OS can't boot either.

    The MBR is copied to a disk partition during fdisk/format. It makes
    that partition "bootable" or "active" The partion must be a primary
    partition (as opposed to "extended").

    The same thing is done if you use something other than fdisk/format to
    set up a drive - a partitioning/drive setup program from the drive
    manufacturer or another 3rd party app, for example.

    I really don't know if your problem lies with how you set up the drive
    or if you are not physically installing the drive on the correct IDE
    cable or jumpering it properly; regardless, if it were me I'd start
    over. Can't hurt. You could either use the drive manufacturer's
    utility (after reading the help thoroughly) or fdisk/format. If the
    latter, this should do you...

    Shut down computer

    1. Open your case

    2. Unhook IDE and power cables to C:

    3. Hook same cables back up to new drive jumpered as master

    4. Insert a boot floppy

    5. Turn on computer

    6. At the A> prompt, type fdisk and follow the instructions. Remember
    that you want to make a bootable, primary partion. Since the drive has
    already been partioned, you will want to wipe the existing one(s).
    Re-reading this first wouldn't hurt.
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;en-us;q255867#1

    7. At the A> prompt, type format and follow any instructions. You may
    have to reboot between #6 & #7, don't recall.

    You now have a bootable drive boot but it won't boot because there is no
    OS. Patience...

    8. Shut down computer, remove new drive, replace old drive exactly as it
    was.

    9. Rejumper new drive as necessary. That depends on whether you intend
    to hook it to the primary IDE channel as slave (pro tem) or on the
    secondary IDE channel as master (also pro tem).

    10. Hook up new drive properly to IDE and power cables.

    11. Remove floppy and boot to old C:

    12. Both drives should show in Explorer. Copy C: to new drive.

    13. If you repeat #2 & #3 the new drive will boot.

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.05...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
     
    dadiOH, Jan 3, 2005
    #9
  10. Jeff G

    Trent© Guest

    On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 09:35:48 -0500, "dadiOH" <> wrote:

    >Jeff G wrote:
    >> I posted a similar message above yesterday, but none of the answers I
    >> received were of any help/use to me. Judging from IQ scores, SAT
    >> scores, degrees, etc, I'm not exactly dumb. So I like to think that
    >> maybe the advice simply wasn't detailed enough. Perhaps I'm the one
    >> who's wrong. I've posted similar messages on Anandtech, Majorgeeks, &
    >> Computer Hope, and none of the responses have been of any help.

    >
    >Well, so much for IQ, SAT scores and degrees...


    In his defense...I read most of the other posts and they ALL seem
    confusing even to me. I can see why he's a little confused.


    Have a nice one...

    Trent

    Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
     
    Trent©, Jan 5, 2005
    #10
  11. Jeff G

    Trent© Guest

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 23:55:28 GMT, Jeff G <> wrote:

    >My OS is Win XP Pro. I have WD Digital Lifeguard, and can d/l Seagate
    >Discwizard if need be.
    >
    >I have two ATA HDs in my system now, and a third in a box waiting to be
    >installed.


    Let me try to start here, Jeff...and I'll try to skip some of the
    small stuff that I don't think you'll really need to know to solve
    your problem...

    In order to prepare a drive for use, you create a partition on the
    drive. And on that drive, you have an option...when creating the
    partition...to make it 'active' or 'not active'.

    A partition must be set to 'active' in order to boot from it...and you
    usually only boot from the master drive on the primary controller.

    If the partition is NOT set to active, you cannot boot from that
    drive. But you can USE the drive...and see everything on a
    drive...even if it is not set to active.

    Years ago, someone who wrote DOS (I guess) decided that it is not a
    good idea to have more than one active partition on a system. In
    reality, it doesn't hurt anything to have more than one active
    partition...in my experience. So...

    If you boot into your primary drive C...and attempt to partition a
    second drive D...you will not be able to set D to 'active' when you
    get done...because you already have an active partition on your boot
    drive. And that's okay...again because its not necessary to have that
    partition active in order to use it.

    Now...

    When you do a cloning...C to D...some cloning programs (for the same
    guarded reasons) will turn off the active partition on one of the
    drives. Which one is finally set to 'not active' really depends on
    the program yer usin'...and whether it does this at all. For
    instance, with Drive Image, you can turn off 'active' on either the
    source drive, the destination drive, or both, or neither.

    More than likely, the cloning you did to D would not boot because the
    boot partition on that drive was not set to 'active'. Its simply an
    option in the cloning program. You can make it active with other
    programs,also...FDISK, Partition Magic, Partition Manager (my latest
    favorite), etc. Its simply an on/off function...and has nothing to do
    with the actual cloning of the data. All the data is there for you.
    The drive simply has not been turned 'on'...for booting.

    >I'd like to replace my old slave with the third HD. But
    >before doing so, I'd like to verify that I can plug in my old slave as
    >the master and boot the computer with it.


    I'd suggest getting Ghost. Last I checked, the default setting is to
    clone over the drive including the 'active' switch. Of course, you
    won't have to worry about that...since the slave drive doesn't need to
    be set to active to use it.

    What I'd do...

    Take out the primary master drive. Put the new drive in
    there...making sure the jumper is set properly. Clone from the D
    drive to that new drive. You don't need to partition that drive.
    Ghost will create a partition on the fly (actually, copy the partition
    to that non-partitioned drive).

    Then put the master back in...and hook up the new drive into the
    computer. You should see things just like before...as if it was your
    old D drive.

    >Various people have asked if
    >I've used fdisk. The answer is no. I know very little about DOS. I
    >went to a DOS help page but didn't find out how to boot to DOS. I also
    >read the Microsoft article on fdisk. When I asked my computer for a
    >Command prompt and switched directories to C:/, it would not let me use
    >the fdisk command.


    For best results, FDISK is usually run from a bootable, system floppy.
    Moreover, you had your slant going in the wrong direction. It should
    be c:\

    >Others have asked about my MBR. I copied the
    >contents of my master to my slave with WD Digital Lifeguard. When I
    >did, I assumed it would have copied everything on my master.


    I don't use the program...but it probably did.

    >Perhaps it
    >didn't. I don't know. I wouldn't know how to check and see if my MBR
    >was on my slave.


    When you do a cloning, its ALWAYS there. So don't worry about that
    issue. Again...to boot to the destination drive after a cloning, you
    need to make sure the partition on the destination drive is set to
    active. Some programs simply turn it off. You need to turn it back
    on when turned off...but only if you want to BOOT from that drive.

    >Another person said it was simple - just go in and
    >change the BIOS. I changed my BIOS so my primary boot device was HDD-1
    >instead of HDD-0 and the computer booted fine. Then on a hunch I
    >changed the primary boot device to HDD-2, and the computer still booted
    >normally. So that was no answer.


    Doing that can cause ENORMOUS problems sometimes. Don't do that. You
    always want to be booting from drive 0 anyway...simplified
    explanation.

    >Can anyone give me a walk-through on what to do???


    See above! lol


    > I've spent the last
    >two days working on this with no success. I have 25 GB of information,
    >data, etc. on my HD, so I really don't want to screw up and have to
    >start from square one again by reinstalling my OS on my master and going
    >from there.


    Just one word of caution...

    When you do a cloning, make SURE yer goin' in the right direction with
    it. In other words, when you hook up a new, blank hard drive to the
    system...to clone to...its rather easy to clone FROM that drive to the
    drive containing all your data. So make sure you go FROM the source
    data drive TO the destination, empty drive. Again...you normally
    don't need to partition or format the new drive. Your cloning program
    should copy the pertinent files (but not all, always) to the new
    drive.

    >And to think - I actually thought this would be easy when I decided to
    >purchase the new HD.


    After you do a couple a day, it becomes pretty easy! lol

    >Thank you to anybody with time and energy to help me. Thank you for
    >even taking the time to read all of this.


    Welcome.

    Write back if you need any clarification on the above.

    Good luck.


    Have a nice one...

    Trent

    Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
     
    Trent©, Jan 5, 2005
    #11
  12. Jeff G

    Guest

    On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 03:52:32 GMT, Trent© <>
    wrote:

    |> If you boot into your primary drive C...and attempt to partition a
    |> second drive D...you will not be able to set D to 'active' when you
    |> get done...because you already have an active partition on your boot
    |> drive. And that's okay...again because its not necessary to have that
    |> partition active in order to use it.

    Ahhhhh, oh that poor guy, if he listens to anyone he's a brave soul.

    I've got two drives, both with an active partition. what happens is the
    second drive takes the D:\ spot.


    Say your first drive has three partitions and your second drive has
    three it will boot like this:
    Drive 1 C EF
    Drive 2 D GH


    --
     
    , Jan 5, 2005
    #12
  13. Jeff G

    why? Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 04:37:39 GMT, wrote:

    >On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 03:52:32 GMT, Trent© <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >|> If you boot into your primary drive C...and attempt to partition a
    >|> second drive D...you will not be able to set D to 'active' when you
    >|> get done...because you already have an active partition on your boot
    >|> drive. And that's okay...again because its not necessary to have that
    >|> partition active in order to use it.
    >
    >Ahhhhh, oh that poor guy, if he listens to anyone he's a brave soul.
    >
    >I've got two drives, both with an active partition. what happens is the
    >second drive takes the D:\ spot.


    2 active partitions at the same time? Do you change your BIOS / use a
    boot manager if it's 2 OS's? Most boot managers hide the 2nd 'active'
    partition and swap active bits depending on selected option.

    >Say your first drive has three partitions and your second drive has
    >three it will boot like this:
    >Drive 1 C EF
    >Drive 2 D GH


    That happens if you have multiple primary partitions anyway (only 1
    active).

    Drive 1 C Active/Primary - EF Extended partition
    Drive 2 D Primary - GH Extended partition

    Letters are allocated, as a 2 pass operation. (NT can do 3)
    primary partitions - 1st drive , other drives.
    extended partitions - 1st drive, other drives.

    Me
     
    why?, Jan 5, 2005
    #13
  14. Jeff G

    why? Guest

    reposted with no archive removed this time.

    On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 04:37:39 GMT, wrote:

    >On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 03:52:32 GMT, Trent© <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >|> If you boot into your primary drive C...and attempt to partition a
    >|> second drive D...you will not be able to set D to 'active' when you
    >|> get done...because you already have an active partition on your boot
    >|> drive. And that's okay...again because its not necessary to have that
    >|> partition active in order to use it.
    >
    >Ahhhhh, oh that poor guy, if he listens to anyone he's a brave soul.
    >
    >I've got two drives, both with an active partition. what happens is the
    >second drive takes the D:\ spot.


    2 active partitions at the same time? Do you change your BIOS / use a
    boot manager if it's 2 OS's? Most boot managers hide the 2nd 'active'
    partition and swap active bits depending on selected option.

    >Say your first drive has three partitions and your second drive has
    >three it will boot like this:
    >Drive 1 C EF
    >Drive 2 D GH


    That happens if you have multiple primary partitions anyway (only 1
    active).

    Drive 1 C Active/Primary - EF Extended partition
    Drive 2 D Primary - GH Extended partition

    Letters are allocated, as a 2 pass operation. (NT can do 3)
    primary partitions - 1st drive , other drives.
    extended partitions - 1st drive, other drives.

    Me
     
    why?, Jan 5, 2005
    #14
  15. Jeff G

    Guest

    On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 08:23:44 GMT, why?
    <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote:

    |>
    |> reposted with no archive removed this time.
    |>
    |> On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 04:37:39 GMT, wrote:
    |>
    |> >On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 03:52:32 GMT, Trent© <>
    |> >wrote:
    |> >
    |> >|> If you boot into your primary drive C...and attempt to partition a
    |> >|> second drive D...you will not be able to set D to 'active' when you
    |> >|> get done...because you already have an active partition on your boot
    |> >|> drive. And that's okay...again because its not necessary to have that
    |> >|> partition active in order to use it.
    |> >
    |> >Ahhhhh, oh that poor guy, if he listens to anyone he's a brave soul.
    |> >
    |> >I've got two drives, both with an active partition. what happens is the
    |> >second drive takes the D:\ spot.
    |>
    |> 2 active partitions at the same time? Do you change your BIOS / use a
    |> boot manager if it's 2 OS's? Most boot managers hide the 2nd 'active'
    |> partition and swap active bits depending on selected option.

    Nothing special, caught me off guard to tell you truth.

    Running 98 and W2K. Installed a new hard drive, made the old one slave
    and it just work'd out that way. Researched it and it's just the way it
    works.


    --
    http://www.nypost.com/commentary/37715.htm
     
    , Jan 5, 2005
    #15
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