How to load balance ADSL with Windows 2000 Server ?

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by Peter Walkfield, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. Dear Sirs,

    My company leased 02 ADSL lines from 01 ISP. Anyone knows
    how to use concurrently them to access Internet for load
    balancing.
    We have 01 Windows 2000 Server computer with MS ISA server
    installed.

    Thank in advance.
    Peter Walkfield
     
    Peter Walkfield, Jan 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Peter Walkfield

    Sgt Galaxy Guest

    Install another ISA server in a two ISA systems array.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >Dear Sirs,
    >
    >My company leased 02 ADSL lines from 01 ISP. Anyone

    knows
    >how to use concurrently them to access Internet for load
    >balancing.
    >We have 01 Windows 2000 Server computer with MS ISA

    server
    >installed.
    >
    >Thank in advance.
    >Peter Walkfield
    >.
    >
     
    Sgt Galaxy, Jan 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. ----- Peter Walkfield wrote: ----

    Dear Sirs

    My company leased 02 ADSL lines from 01 ISP. Anyone knows
    how to use concurrently them to access Internet for load
    balancing
    We have 01 Windows 2000 Server computer with MS ISA server
    installed

    Thank in advance
    Peter Walkfiel

    Uh? There must be something you aren't telling us

    One Server - but two connections? Why didn't you order one ADSL link and double the bandwidth


    In any case, previous advice is correct. You need another server if you want to use the second link and load balance. Otherwise, you might be limited to using the second link for something like email, if you have permanent static IP numbers assigned with the ADSL connections. You dial up on the primary link for your inbound connections. Dial second link and set the DNS MX records to that IP number and email will come in on that link

    Outbound is a bit of a mystery, but I suspect that if you set the gateway IP to the first link for destination 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 with a route add 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 (gatewayIP) -p type command, then all traffic will come in and out on that link.

    You could try and split the traffic by splitting the routes across both links

    > route add 0.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[1]) -
    > route add 128.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[2]) -


    This is much easier with two network cards configured as external gateways connected directly with ADSL routers. One more network card for internal traffic. I haven't tried this myself, but theoretically at least you should be able to do some form of load balancing

    If you have no idea what any of the above means, please consider some external professional assistance. Your ISP may be a good starting point.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TWFya28=?=, Jan 5, 2004
    #3
  4. Peter Walkfield

    billyw Guest

    i would agree with this... why the 2 lines?
    is it to achieve higher upload at reduced cost?

    "Marko" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > ----- Peter Walkfield wrote: -----
    >
    > Dear Sirs,
    >
    > My company leased 02 ADSL lines from 01 ISP. Anyone knows
    > how to use concurrently them to access Internet for load
    > balancing.
    > We have 01 Windows 2000 Server computer with MS ISA server
    > installed.
    >
    > Thank in advance.
    > Peter Walkfield
    >
    > Uh? There must be something you aren't telling us.
    >
    > One Server - but two connections? Why didn't you order one ADSL link and

    double the bandwidth?
    >
    >
    > In any case, previous advice is correct. You need another server if you

    want to use the second link and load balance. Otherwise, you might be
    limited to using the second link for something like email, if you have
    permanent static IP numbers assigned with the ADSL connections. You dial up
    on the primary link for your inbound connections. Dial second link and set
    the DNS MX records to that IP number and email will come in on that link.
    >
    > Outbound is a bit of a mystery, but I suspect that if you set the gateway

    IP to the first link for destination 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 with a route add
    0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 (gatewayIP) -p type command, then all traffic will come in
    and out on that link.
    >
    > You could try and split the traffic by splitting the routes across both

    links.
    >
    > > route add 0.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[1]) -p
    > > route add 128.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[2]) -p

    >
    > This is much easier with two network cards configured as external gateways

    connected directly with ADSL routers. One more network card for internal
    traffic. I haven't tried this myself, but theoretically at least you should
    be able to do some form of load balancing.
    >
    >
    > If you have no idea what any of the above means, please consider some

    external professional assistance. Your ISP may be a good starting point.
     
    billyw, Jan 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Thank for all comments !

    Yes, we want to speed up connection with lower cost.
    In my country, ADSL speed is not guaranteed and cost is
    cheaper than leased line connection.

    My ISP can not help in this case.

    I agree with you to install a new server in ISA array.
    But it is better if we can use 01 server with 02 external
    NICs.
    Can you explain more detail this configuration? Esp. two
    lines "route add".

    Thanks,
    Peter Walkfield
    >-----Original Message-----
    >i would agree with this... why the 2 lines?
    >is it to achieve higher upload at reduced cost?
    >
    >"Marko" <> wrote in

    message
    >news:...
    >>
    >>
    >> ----- Peter Walkfield wrote: -----
    >>
    >> Dear Sirs,
    >>
    >> My company leased 02 ADSL lines from 01 ISP.

    Anyone knows
    >> how to use concurrently them to access Internet

    for load
    >> balancing.
    >> We have 01 Windows 2000 Server computer with MS

    ISA server
    >> installed.
    >>
    >> Thank in advance.
    >> Peter Walkfield
    >>
    >> Uh? There must be something you aren't telling us.
    >>
    >> One Server - but two connections? Why didn't you order

    one ADSL link and
    >double the bandwidth?
    >>
    >>
    >> In any case, previous advice is correct. You need

    another server if you
    >want to use the second link and load balance. Otherwise,

    you might be
    >limited to using the second link for something like

    email, if you have
    >permanent static IP numbers assigned with the ADSL

    connections. You dial up
    >on the primary link for your inbound connections. Dial

    second link and set
    >the DNS MX records to that IP number and email will come

    in on that link.
    >>
    >> Outbound is a bit of a mystery, but I suspect that if

    you set the gateway
    >IP to the first link for destination 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0

    with a route add
    >0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 (gatewayIP) -p type command, then all

    traffic will come in
    >and out on that link.
    >>
    >> You could try and split the traffic by splitting the

    routes across both
    >links.
    >>
    >> > route add 0.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[1]) -p
    >> > route add 128.0.0.0 128.0.0.0 (gatewayIP[2]) -p

    >>
    >> This is much easier with two network cards configured

    as external gateways
    >connected directly with ADSL routers. One more network

    card for internal
    >traffic. I haven't tried this myself, but theoretically

    at least you should
    >be able to do some form of load balancing.
    >>
    >>
    >> If you have no idea what any of the above means, please

    consider some
    >external professional assistance. Your ISP may be a good

    starting point.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Peter Walkfield, Jan 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Peter Walkfield

    Marko Guest


    >-----Original Message-----
    >Yes, we want to speed up connection with lower cost.
    >In my country, ADSL speed is not guaranteed and cost is
    >cheaper than leased line connection.
    >
    >My ISP can not help in this case.
    >
    >I agree with you to install a new server in ISA array.
    >But it is better if we can use 01 server with 02 external
    >NICs.
    >Can you explain more detail this configuration? Esp. two
    >lines "route add".



    Key is the last suggestion. If you need to ask about how
    to use route add, then you should give serious
    consideration to having an expert on site to help you do
    this in any case. I didn't learn what I know by posting
    hundreds of scenarios to mcse newsgroups and waiting for a
    good response or by accumulating the posts of others.
    That's why I don't think it would be reasonable to expect
    detailed explanation here so that you can use this
    newsgroup to develop skills you are not in possession of.
    I see this as more of a forum for pointing you in the
    right direction, rather than detailing a step by step
    process for solving problems.

    I am not writing this to disrespect you, but you should
    see that a detailed response to your last question is
    outside of the scope of this newsgroup and more likely to
    be developed in a classroom or at home, working on your
    network lab exercises. Hence, seek the personal guidance
    of someone who knows:

    1/ How to correctly configure and install three network
    cards in one server
    2/ How to get two cards to use two separate ADSL routers
    as a preferred internet gateway
    3/ How to add routes using the route add -p type command
    and split the internet effectively into two large subnets
    to create pseudo load balanced networking.

    Otherwise, start by disregarding everything I have said,
    go to a command prompt, type "route /?" and learn how this
    command works. Figure out how to add multiple network
    cards and correctly configure gateways. Then, you may
    have the solution. Then again, you may decide that you
    were out of your depth on this one and someone else was
    trying to gently guide you to a quicker solution where you
    would likely still learn all the same stupid network
    tricks I described above to achieve smoke and mirrors load
    balancing act.
     
    Marko, Jan 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Thank you very much.

    Peter Walkfield

    >-----Original Message-----
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>Yes, we want to speed up connection with lower cost.
    >>In my country, ADSL speed is not guaranteed and cost is
    >>cheaper than leased line connection.
    >>
    >>My ISP can not help in this case.
    >>
    >>I agree with you to install a new server in ISA array.
    >>But it is better if we can use 01 server with 02

    external
    >>NICs.
    >>Can you explain more detail this configuration? Esp. two
    >>lines "route add".

    >
    >
    >Key is the last suggestion. If you need to ask about how
    >to use route add, then you should give serious
    >consideration to having an expert on site to help you do
    >this in any case. I didn't learn what I know by posting
    >hundreds of scenarios to mcse newsgroups and waiting for

    a
    >good response or by accumulating the posts of others.
    >That's why I don't think it would be reasonable to expect
    >detailed explanation here so that you can use this
    >newsgroup to develop skills you are not in possession

    of.
    >I see this as more of a forum for pointing you in the
    >right direction, rather than detailing a step by step
    >process for solving problems.
    >
    >I am not writing this to disrespect you, but you should
    >see that a detailed response to your last question is
    >outside of the scope of this newsgroup and more likely to
    >be developed in a classroom or at home, working on your
    >network lab exercises. Hence, seek the personal guidance
    >of someone who knows:
    >
    >1/ How to correctly configure and install three network
    >cards in one server
    >2/ How to get two cards to use two separate ADSL routers
    >as a preferred internet gateway
    >3/ How to add routes using the route add -p type command
    >and split the internet effectively into two large subnets
    >to create pseudo load balanced networking.
    >
    >Otherwise, start by disregarding everything I have said,
    >go to a command prompt, type "route /?" and learn how

    this
    >command works. Figure out how to add multiple network
    >cards and correctly configure gateways. Then, you may
    >have the solution. Then again, you may decide that you
    >were out of your depth on this one and someone else was
    >trying to gently guide you to a quicker solution where

    you
    >would likely still learn all the same stupid network
    >tricks I described above to achieve smoke and mirrors

    load
    >balancing act.
    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Peter Walkfield, Jan 8, 2004
    #7
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