How to identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?... name, address, telephone

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by dsaklad@gnu.org, May 9, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Computer forensics

    How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    name, address, telephone
    , May 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jim Watt Guest

    On 9 May 2006 14:54:45 -0700, ""
    <> wrote:

    >Computer forensics
    >
    >How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    >name, address, telephone


    You need a crystal ball, otherwise you dont.
    --
    Jim Watt
    http://www.gibnet.com
    Jim Watt, May 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. Re: How to identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...name, address, telephone

    wrote:
    > Computer forensics
    >
    > How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    > name, address, telephone


    Not at all.

    As best you may find the system that has been hacked to relay the spam.
    Then you can call them, they will ignore you, then you can call the
    Brazilian CERT, which will happily receive your request and don't do
    anything.

    Beware: anything except the last Received-header is potentially faked.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, May 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Moe Trin Guest

    On 9 May 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    <>, wrote:

    >Computer forensics


    Sorta

    >How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    >name, address, telephone


    Source of the spam message? Usually some zombie box, that your mail server
    shouldn't be accepting mail from - that's what blocklists are for. If it
    is email, learn to read the headers:
    http://www.stopspam.org/email/headers.html
    Spam on Usenet is similar - but use the "Path:" header, rather than the
    "Received:" headers trail.

    Benefactor of the spam? You _could_ trace the powdered plastic dog dung
    that the spammer is trying to sell, but why bother? All you are doing is
    confirming that yours is a valid mail address that wishes to receive even
    more spam. And a free clue - most spammers are using throwaway domain
    registrations, and concealing services.

    Posting from .us - OK, if the spam involves a _federal_crime_ or involves
    more than US$5,000 damage/loss _to_you_alone_ then contact the FBI.
    Otherwise, ignore it, or consider

    news.admin.net-abuse.email Discussion of abuse of email systems.
    news.admin.net-abuse.misc Network facility abuse, including spamming.
    news.admin.net-abuse.sightings Sightings of net abuse. (Moderated)
    news.admin.net-abuse.usenet Discussion of abuse of the Usenet system.

    Old guy
    Moe Trin, May 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Rick Merrill Guest

    Re: How to identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...name, address, telephone

    wrote:

    > Computer forensics
    >
    > How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    > name, address, telephone
    >


    Feed the IP from the header into SamSpade.
    Rick Merrill, May 10, 2006
    #5
  6. ~David~ Guest

    Re: How to identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...name, address, telephone

    As others have noted, it is almost impossible. It is not that hard to set up a
    mailing server and have it send anonymous email. Spammers have been perfecting
    this on a massive scale for years, and often use hijacked individuals PC's or
    hacked mail relays to send their spam.

    wrote:
    > Computer forensics
    >
    > How do you identify the ultimate source of a spam type message?...
    > name, address, telephone
    >
    ~David~, May 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Don Saklad Guest

    forensic
    http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/forensics
    Function: noun
    1 : an argumentative exercise

    2 plural but singular or plural in construction :
    the art or study of argumentative discourse
    http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/forensics



    Related phrases:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=define: forensics
    computer forensics
    national forensics league
    cyber forensics
    ethical forensics

    Definitions of forensics on the Web:
    * In document management terms,
    forensic work is comprised of:
    Recreating deleted or missing files from hard drives

    Validating dates
    and logged in authors / editors of documents

    Certifying key elements of documents and/or hardware
    for legal purposes
    http://www.docuwaresolutions.co.uk/glossary.asp

    * Forensics or forensic science is the application of
    science to questions which are
    of interest to the legal system
    as well as social sciences such as archaeology.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forensics


    Definitions of computer forensics on the Web:
    * Computer Forensics is the use of specialized techniques
    for recovery, authentication, and analysis of electronic
    data when a case involves issues relating to
    reconstruction of computer usage,
    examination of residual data,
    authentication of data by technical analysis or
    explanation of technical features of data and computer
    usage. ...
    http://www.krollontrack.com/legalresources/glossary.asp

    * The investigation of a computer system or any device that
    contains a processor and memory in order to determine who,
    what, where, when and how such digital devices temporary
    or persistent storage to another device.
    http://www.wetstonetech.com/page/page/1972572.htm

    * Computer forensics deals with the science of determining
    computer-related conduct - the who, what, when, where, and
    how of computer and technology use.
    http://www.tecrime.com/0gloss.htm

    * Computer forensics is the process of investigating data
    processing equipment-- typically a home computer, laptop,
    server, or office workstation-- to determine if the
    equipment has been used for illegal, unauthorized, or
    unusual activities.

    It can also include monitoring a network
    for the same purpose. ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_forensics


    Definitions of cyber forensics on the Web:
    * The application of scientifically proven methods to
    gather, process, interpret, and to use digital evidence to
    provide a conclusive description of cyber crime
    activities.

    Cyber forensics also includes the act of making digital
    data suitable for inclusion into a criminal investigation.

    Today cyber forensics is a term used in conjunction with
    law enforcement, and is offered as courses at many
    colleges and universities worldwide.
    http://www.wetstonetech.com/page/page/1972572.htm
    http://www.google.com/search?q=define: forensics
    Don Saklad, May 11, 2006
    #7
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