How to go from VHS >computer > DVD

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Ferdinand, Nov 10, 2004.

  1. Ferdinand

    Ferdinand Guest

    I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    then burn the movie onto a dvd?

    I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.





    ----------------------
    Ferdinand
    www.cultsecrets.com
    Ferdinand, Nov 10, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Ferdinand

    Graham Mayor Guest

    Unless you plan to do a lot of this, and have lots of spare time on your
    hands, don't bother. Buy the DVD. It is very time consuming, you will have
    to purchase extra hardware and the resulting quality will never be as good
    as that of an original DVD; however if you insist, you need a video capture
    card or USB connected capture utility and software capable both of capturing
    the audio/video and of editing the results.

    FWIW the Plextor ConvertX produces good results, and NeroVisionExpress3 is a
    solid but slow means of capturing and editing its output. The demands of
    such a system on your PC will inhibit your ability to work on the PC during
    the hours that the conversions will take.

    --
    <>>< ><<> ><<>
    Graham Mayor
    <>>< ><<> ><<>




    Ferdinand wrote:
    > I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    >
    > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----------------------
    > Ferdinand
    > www.cultsecrets.com
    Graham Mayor, Nov 10, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ferdinand

    redflag Guest

    Graham is right about the relative high cost in money
    and time of copying a VHS into DVD versus the price of DVD movies unless:

    1) The movie you want to copy is unique and commercially unavailable in DVD or

    2) It's a home movie you'd like to preserve for posterity.

    However, I think that these kinds of projects are worthwile if for no other
    reason than to get an idea how complex the process must be to reissue old
    movies into the new digital format.

    The best quality DVD reproductions of old movies require more than merely
    copying the celuloid or videotape onto a hard drive and then burning a master.

    In fact, it takes hundreds of hours of labor to examine, edit, clean and
    restore movies from negative, filter the sound track to eliminate hisses
    and scratches, etc. Additionally, there's the development and production of
    bonus features which themselves often require elaborate preparation and
    production.

    That's just the mechanical aspect of the whole deal.

    The legal negotiations and administrative paperwork previous to obtaining
    the rights of reproduction can often take years to conclude before any
    actual work is started toward releasing a movie onto DVD.

    Now, I'm talking about a DVD that you can buy and KEEP for years, not
    something that'll likely wind up at a yard sale.

    To get an idea of what I'm talking about you can visit the Criterion
    Collection's web site.

    http://www.criterionco.com/asp/

    Every film listed in their catalogue has a brief explanation of the type
    of restoration that took place in order to make it available. That's one
    reason their DVDs often cost $10 or $20 more than the average movie.

    For example, some years back I bought a used copy of Akira Kurosawa's
    "Seven Samurai" on VHS for about $10. It came in two hefty tapes with
    damaged box label. The video quality was good. About two years ago I
    bought the same movie on DVD for $39.95 new. The difference in video
    quality is extraordinary. The DVD is so well restored that at times
    you'd think that 50-year old movie was made last year. Also, It has
    commentary by an expert in Japanese cinema that actually _knows_
    Japanese!

    All this may seem awfully tangential to Ferdinand's original question
    but I think that if he were to try to tranfer a videotape onto DVD
    he'd learn a lot more about the process and gain a greater appreciation
    for the enormous technological advance contained in digital technology.

    This reminds me of what Karl Marx once wrote:

    "There is no Royal Road to Science (knowledge), and only those
    willing to climb its steep paths will reach its luminous summits."



    Graham Mayor wrote:
    >
    > Unless you plan to do a lot of this, and have lots of spare time on your
    > hands, don't bother. Buy the DVD. It is very time consuming, you will have
    > to purchase extra hardware and the resulting quality will never be as good
    > as that of an original DVD; however if you insist, you need a video capture
    > card or USB connected capture utility and software capable both of capturing
    > the audio/video and of editing the results.
    >
    > FWIW the Plextor ConvertX produces good results, and NeroVisionExpress3 is a
    > solid but slow means of capturing and editing its output. The demands of
    > such a system on your PC will inhibit your ability to work on the PC during
    > the hours that the conversions will take.
    >
    > --
    > <>>< ><<> ><<>
    > Graham Mayor
    > <>>< ><<> ><<>
    >
    > Ferdinand wrote:
    > > I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    > >
    > > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ----------------------
    > > Ferdinand
    > > www.cultsecrets.com


    --
    "Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
    with criticism of existing property relations."

    "All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
    of human nature."

    You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
    our web page at http://www.slp.org
    redflag, Nov 10, 2004
    #3
  4. Ferdinand

    redflag Guest

    Ferdinand wrote:
    >
    > I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    >
    > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    >


    Assuming you already have VCR and a burner, you'll need a video
    capture card such as a Win-TVGo or a video card with a TV tuner
    chipset. Most cards include the necessary software to capture,
    digitize and compress the images.

    The best sources to learn specifics that I know of are these:

    http://www.videohelp.com/capture

    http://www.doom9.org/

    Three things to remember are that initial compression, picture
    ratio and rate of capture or the ammount of frames captured per
    second, have a lot to do with the quality of the final product.

    An analogy to that (not the best, I admit) is how images wind up
    looking when you alter the shutter speed and aperture in a SLR
    camera. For example, a slow camera speed and wider aperture produces
    a better image where there is little light and movement from the
    subject. Wheras the same settings produce a blurry, over-exposed
    picture in bright sunlight and where objects are in motion. The
    opposite is true when a small aperture and fast shutter speed is
    applied to bright conditions and objects in motion: the moving
    subject seems to be frozen in time and the contrast between objects
    well-defined.

    If at all possible, try to find out the frame rate of the VCR
    and match it as close as possible in your capture settings.

    In other words, the principles of photography can almost ("almost",
    I said!) be applied to the rules of video transfer. And what is
    video if not moving pictures?

    It's never a good idea to attempt to capture a VHS straight into
    a DVD format; You have little control over the compression ratio
    of the transfer and the finished product is often disappointing.

    Little or no compression and as large a picture ratio as possible
    mean a larger picture and a larger picture means a better image when
    compressed. That is, of course, assuming that your VCR reproduces
    the vhs tape really well.

    But a larger picture also means a larger file and you can expect
    to use up a lot--and I mean A LOT--of hard drive space.

    Therefore you'll need a dedicated hard drive of no less than
    100 gigs to do the job right. Otherwise, you'll have to capture
    the video file in segments and compress each segment before
    you can capture the next one. Believe me, it takes a lot of
    HD space. The HD should be a 7200 rpm or faster and should be
    frequently defragmented.

    Also, make sure that you have all the memory you can afford as
    well as a CPU no slower than 800Mhz.

    Once you get all of the necessary hardware installed and lined up
    all you need to remember are the issues of compression, picture
    ratio and capture speed.

    Good luck!


    --
    "Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
    with criticism of existing property relations."

    "All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
    of human nature."

    You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
    our web page at http://www.slp.org
    redflag, Nov 10, 2004
    #4
  5. Ferdinand

    Ferdinand B Guest

    "Graham Mayor" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Unless you plan to do a lot of this, and have lots of spare time on your
    > hands, don't bother. Buy the DVD.


    What I want is not available on DVD. It is a rare on video also.




    It is very time consuming, you will have
    > to purchase extra hardware and the resulting quality will never be as good
    > as that of an original DVD; however if you insist, you need a video capture
    > card or USB connected capture utility and software capable both of capturing
    > the audio/video and of editing the results.
    >
    > FWIW the Plextor ConvertX produces good results, and NeroVisionExpress3 is a
    > solid but slow means of capturing and editing its output. The demands of
    > such a system on your PC will inhibit your ability to work on the PC during
    > the hours that the conversions will take.
    >
    > --
    > <>>< ><<> ><<>
    > Graham Mayor
    > <>>< ><<> ><<>
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Ferdinand wrote:
    > > I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    > >
    > > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > ----------------------
    > > Ferdinand
    > > www.cultsecrets.com
    Ferdinand B, Nov 10, 2004
    #5
  6. Ferdinand

    SoHillsGuy Guest

    If you have a computer which already has a DVD burner, you can hook up a VHS to
    a device called Dazzle Hollywood DV-Bridge, which connects to your computer.

    This allows you to convert analog to digital, which you'll need for DVD
    burning.
    SoHillsGuy, Nov 10, 2004
    #6
  7. Ferdinand

    Brian Guest

    (Ferdinand) wrote:

    >I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    >then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    >
    >I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    >anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    >needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >----------------------
    >Ferdinand
    >www.cultsecrets.com


    Try going to www.dvdrhelp.com
    You can find a lot of information and step by step guides on this
    subject.

    Regards Brian
    Brian, Nov 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Ferdinand

    Mike Guest

    I capture old video from my 8mm camcorder directly to mpeg2 (dvd format)
    with an ATI 9600pro AIW then author it to dvd. Does a good job and is easy,
    good info at the sites mentioned here and at http://www.digitalfaq.com/ for
    AIW specific info.

    Mike

    "Ferdinand" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    >
    > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----------------------
    > Ferdinand
    > www.cultsecrets.com
    Mike, Nov 12, 2004
    #8
  9. Ferdinand

    jimbo Guest

    Ferdinand wrote:
    > I was wondering how I can play a vhs and record it onto my computer,
    > then burn the movie onto a dvd?
    >
    > I have a general idea, but I would appreciate the specifics from
    > anyone who has done this. I am interested in the types of software
    > needed, types of cords I needs, and anything else I should know.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > ----------------------
    > Ferdinand
    > www.cultsecrets.com


    WinTV-PVR-250 and a DVD burner. WinTV has all of the software you need.
    Quality is as good as the VHS.

    jimbo
    jimbo, Nov 12, 2004
    #9
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