how to get a fast zero-config (APIPA) IP address assignment at link start?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by robin, Jan 23, 2006.

  1. robin

    robin Guest

    I would like to force a newly connected Ethernet link to use a zero-config
    derived
    IP address (aka APIPA) instead of DHCP assigned address (in other words the
    169.256.xxx.xxx
    link is preferred). There is a lot of info on the net about the
    complementary case
    of disallowing/defeating zero-config IP addresses, nothing that I have been
    able
    to find on for my situation.

    The problem is that Windows serializes the link configuration through the
    DHCP client
    on Windows before attempting to any zero-config options. The DHCP client
    requires
    60-second timeout which is far too long to mobile product users to wait for
    the link
    to become "usable".

    Does anyone know of a way to coersce the Windows DHCP client into stop and
    allow
    the zero-config to run? Any suggestion or hacks, gentle or harsh, are
    solicited.
    :)
     
    robin, Jan 23, 2006
    #1
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  2. This is relevant: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/220874. It suggests
    that you configure the adapter to use an autonet address manually. You
    might also consider putting a DHCP server on the network. This can be done
    via Windows2003 Server, a cheap router, or 3rd part DHCP server software.

    If you would, let me know about the scenario where you want to do this.
    It seems like everywhere I go, there's a DHCP server ready. Maybe if I was
    in a plane connecting straight to another person's laptop I might want to
    use an autonet address. It wouldn't seem worth working around the delay in
    this case.

    --
    Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    "robin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I would like to force a newly connected Ethernet link to use a zero-config
    >derived
    > IP address (aka APIPA) instead of DHCP assigned address (in other words
    > the 169.256.xxx.xxx
    > link is preferred). There is a lot of info on the net about the
    > complementary case
    > of disallowing/defeating zero-config IP addresses, nothing that I have
    > been able
    > to find on for my situation.
    >
    > The problem is that Windows serializes the link configuration through the
    > DHCP client
    > on Windows before attempting to any zero-config options. The DHCP client
    > requires
    > 60-second timeout which is far too long to mobile product users to wait
    > for the link
    > to become "usable".
    >
    > Does anyone know of a way to coersce the Windows DHCP client into stop and
    > allow
    > the zero-config to run? Any suggestion or hacks, gentle or harsh, are
    > solicited.
    > :)
    >
    >
     
    Frank Schwieterman [MSFT], Jan 25, 2006
    #2
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  3. robin

    robin Guest

    The problem is that this device is a mobile device and plugs into a host
    WindowsXP machine via USB, and presents a NIC with a virtualized network
    behind the NIC.

    While its technically possible to run a DHCP server on this virtualized
    network, this technique is seen as a barrier by corporate IT customers.
    These customers generally do not want to see DHCP servers pop-up on their
    networks turf.
    This product technically extends the corporate network (some small amount),
    and they see adding un-administrated DHCP servers as an administrative
    problem. Each DHCP server represents the yet another security surface and
    the potential for breach: its better to not use DHCP when zero-config would
    suffice.

    Our product doesn't really need an DHCP-dispensed address, just a valid IP
    address, dispensed quickly at USB-plug-in-time.
    Zero-config should work just fine as a substitute for DHCP in our case,
    except for the 60-second wait for the Windows DHCP client to timeout.



    "Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]" <> wrote in message
    news:43d6d209$...
    > This is relevant: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/220874. It suggests
    > that you configure the adapter to use an autonet address manually. You
    > might also consider putting a DHCP server on the network. This can be
    > done via Windows2003 Server, a cheap router, or 3rd part DHCP server
    > software.
    >
    > If you would, let me know about the scenario where you want to do this.
    > It seems like everywhere I go, there's a DHCP server ready. Maybe if I
    > was in a plane connecting straight to another person's laptop I might want
    > to use an autonet address. It wouldn't seem worth working around the
    > delay in this case.
    >
    > --
    > Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]
    >
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    > rights.
    >
    > "robin" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I would like to force a newly connected Ethernet link to use a zero-config
    >>derived
    >> IP address (aka APIPA) instead of DHCP assigned address (in other words
    >> the 169.256.xxx.xxx
    >> link is preferred). There is a lot of info on the net about the
    >> complementary case
    >> of disallowing/defeating zero-config IP addresses, nothing that I have
    >> been able
    >> to find on for my situation.
    >>
    >> The problem is that Windows serializes the link configuration through the
    >> DHCP client
    >> on Windows before attempting to any zero-config options. The DHCP client
    >> requires
    >> 60-second timeout which is far too long to mobile product users to wait
    >> for the link
    >> to become "usable".
    >>
    >> Does anyone know of a way to coersce the Windows DHCP client into stop
    >> and allow
    >> the zero-config to run? Any suggestion or hacks, gentle or harsh, are
    >> solicited.
    >> :)
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    robin, Jan 25, 2006
    #3
  4. robin

    robin Guest

    BTW, thanks for the pointer to the article.


    "Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]" <> wrote in message
    news:43d6d209$...
    > This is relevant: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/220874. It suggests
    > that you configure the adapter to use an autonet address manually. You
    > might also consider putting a DHCP server on the network. This can be
    > done via Windows2003 Server, a cheap router, or 3rd part DHCP server
    > software.
    >
    > If you would, let me know about the scenario where you want to do this.
    > It seems like everywhere I go, there's a DHCP server ready. Maybe if I
    > was in a plane connecting straight to another person's laptop I might want
    > to use an autonet address. It wouldn't seem worth working around the
    > delay in this case.
    >
    > --
    > Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]
    >
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    > rights.
    >
    > "robin" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I would like to force a newly connected Ethernet link to use a zero-config
    >>derived
    >> IP address (aka APIPA) instead of DHCP assigned address (in other words
    >> the 169.256.xxx.xxx
    >> link is preferred). There is a lot of info on the net about the
    >> complementary case
    >> of disallowing/defeating zero-config IP addresses, nothing that I have
    >> been able
    >> to find on for my situation.
    >>
    >> The problem is that Windows serializes the link configuration through the
    >> DHCP client
    >> on Windows before attempting to any zero-config options. The DHCP client
    >> requires
    >> 60-second timeout which is far too long to mobile product users to wait
    >> for the link
    >> to become "usable".
    >>
    >> Does anyone know of a way to coersce the Windows DHCP client into stop
    >> and allow
    >> the zero-config to run? Any suggestion or hacks, gentle or harsh, are
    >> solicited.
    >> :)
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    robin, Jan 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Sorry to be so slow getting back to this...

    Did you consider configuring a static IP address? I imagine it might be
    undesirable due to the configuration overhead, but I suspect the same amount
    of configuration overhead would be expected to prevent the DHCP timeout.


    --
    Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    "robin" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The problem is that this device is a mobile device and plugs into a host
    > WindowsXP machine via USB, and presents a NIC with a virtualized network
    > behind the NIC.
    >
    > While its technically possible to run a DHCP server on this virtualized
    > network, this technique is seen as a barrier by corporate IT customers.
    > These customers generally do not want to see DHCP servers pop-up on their
    > networks turf.
    > This product technically extends the corporate network (some small
    > amount), and they see adding un-administrated DHCP servers as an
    > administrative problem. Each DHCP server represents the yet another
    > security surface and the potential for breach: its better to not use DHCP
    > when zero-config would suffice.
    >
    > Our product doesn't really need an DHCP-dispensed address, just a valid IP
    > address, dispensed quickly at USB-plug-in-time.
    > Zero-config should work just fine as a substitute for DHCP in our case,
    > except for the 60-second wait for the Windows DHCP client to timeout.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]" <> wrote in
    > message news:43d6d209$...
    >> This is relevant: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/220874. It suggests
    >> that you configure the adapter to use an autonet address manually. You
    >> might also consider putting a DHCP server on the network. This can be
    >> done via Windows2003 Server, a cheap router, or 3rd part DHCP server
    >> software.
    >>
    >> If you would, let me know about the scenario where you want to do this.
    >> It seems like everywhere I go, there's a DHCP server ready. Maybe if I
    >> was in a plane connecting straight to another person's laptop I might
    >> want to use an autonet address. It wouldn't seem worth working around
    >> the delay in this case.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Frank Schwieterman [MSFT]
    >>
    >> This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    >> rights.
    >>
    >> "robin" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I would like to force a newly connected Ethernet link to use a
    >>>zero-config derived
    >>> IP address (aka APIPA) instead of DHCP assigned address (in other words
    >>> the 169.256.xxx.xxx
    >>> link is preferred). There is a lot of info on the net about the
    >>> complementary case
    >>> of disallowing/defeating zero-config IP addresses, nothing that I have
    >>> been able
    >>> to find on for my situation.
    >>>
    >>> The problem is that Windows serializes the link configuration through
    >>> the DHCP client
    >>> on Windows before attempting to any zero-config options. The DHCP client
    >>> requires
    >>> 60-second timeout which is far too long to mobile product users to wait
    >>> for the link
    >>> to become "usable".
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know of a way to coersce the Windows DHCP client into stop
    >>> and allow
    >>> the zero-config to run? Any suggestion or hacks, gentle or harsh, are
    >>> solicited.
    >>> :)
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Frank Schwieterman [MSFT], Feb 18, 2006
    #5
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