How to correctly expose a scene like this?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by 223rem, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. 223rem

    223rem Guest

    223rem, Mar 25, 2007
    #1
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  2. 223rem wrote:
    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    The brightness range exceeds the ability of your camera to capture,
    maybe; try exposure compensation down a few stops, and if that saves
    the highlights, then see if you can bring back adequate shadow detail in
    post-processing.

    Or use a reflector to fill the dark areas, or fill flash.

    While Arwen doesn't have much white on her, fill flash was still the key
    to bringing up the shadow areas to look right.
    <http://dd-b.net/cgi-bin/picpage.pl/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/2007/0300x-misc?pic=ddb%2020070323%20010-014>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. Charles Schuler, Mar 25, 2007
    #3
  4. 223rem

    223rem Guest

    223rem, Mar 25, 2007
    #4
  5. 223rem

    teflon Guest

    On 25/3/07 15:38, in article ,
    "223rem" <> wrote:

    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    It might have helped if you'd tidied the scene before shooting, or moved a
    little closer, or both.

    A simple 'fill-in' could have been improvised with a magazine or paper.

    Just a thought.
     
    teflon, Mar 26, 2007
    #5
  6. 223rem

    Paul Mitchum Guest

    223rem <> wrote:

    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    This kind of thing is why people have flash guns that point up.
     
    Paul Mitchum, Mar 26, 2007
    #6
  7. 223rem

    223rem Guest

    teflon wrote:
    > On 25/3/07 15:38, in article ,
    > "223rem" <> wrote:
    >
    >> http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >>
    >> I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    >> overexposed in all the shots I took.

    >
    > It might have helped if you'd tidied the scene before shooting, or moved a
    > little closer, or both.
    >
    > A simple 'fill-in' could have been improvised with a magazine or paper.
    >
    > Just a thought.
    >


    Those were live cats, not stuffed ones, moving too close would have made
    them react to me.
     
    223rem, Mar 26, 2007
    #7
  8. 223rem

    dj_nme Guest

    223rem wrote:

    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    You can manipulate the image afterwards, this is digital photography NG
    after all.
    It is better to expose the image so that the lighter shades don't blow out.
    Later, in your image editor (Corel Photopaint, GIMP, Adobe Photoshop,
    etc) you can shift the "grey point" toward the shadow end of the
    histogram or adjust the "gamma" upwards until enough shadow detail is
    revealed.
    The best settings on your camera to have is to for the contrast,
    sharpness and saturation turned right down, the highest resolution set
    and the finest jpeg setting (or RAW, if your camera allows).
     
    dj_nme, Mar 27, 2007
    #8
  9. "223rem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Charles Schuler wrote:
    >> "223rem" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >>>
    >>> I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    >>> overexposed in all the shots I took.

    >>
    >> You might find this interesting"
    >> http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/high-dynamic-range.htm

    >
    > It is interesting, but how do apply that to a non-static scene?


    The picture you posted (approaching static) lends itself to the article.
    Use a tripod and exposure bracketing.
     
    Charles Schuler, Mar 27, 2007
    #9
  10. 223rem

    John Sheehy Guest

    223rem <> wrote in news:i-
    :

    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    If you shot RAW, the red channel would not be blown out like the green, and
    some converters would give greyscale highlights (shades of white) where
    your image is blown out. Other than that, you will need to use negative EC
    or a sunny-f/16 manual setting, with the sun directly on the cat.

    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    John Sheehy, Apr 1, 2007
    #10
  11. 223rem

    Rod Guest

    223rem wrote:
    > http://i5.tinypic.com/2znztyd.jpg
    >
    > I wanted a "chiaroscurro" look, but the white fur keept getting
    > overexposed in all the shots I took.


    Shoot in RAW or use flash fill.
     
    Rod, Apr 1, 2007
    #11
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