How to clean the socket 775 heatsink + cooling fan?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by pg, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. pg

    pg Guest

    One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    is very dusty.

    So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.

    In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.

    The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.

    This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.

    I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.

    If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....

    So, to the hardware gurus here ---

    1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    without breaking anything?

    2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?

    Please advise.

    Thank you !!
    pg, Apr 28, 2009
    #1
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  2. pg

    smlunatick Guest

    On Apr 28, 12:05 pm, pg <> wrote:
    > One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    > is very dusty.
    >
    > So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    > fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >
    > In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    > heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    > dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >
    > The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    > of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    > can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >
    > This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    > between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >
    > I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >
    > If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >
    > So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >
    > 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    > without breaking anything?
    >
    > 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    > grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >
    > Please advise.
    >
    > Thank you !!


    If the heatsink / fan is so mucked up with grime, I would consider
    locating a "replacement" heatsink / fan assembly. A quick search on a
    known parts web site (www.startech.com) comes up with 4 new heatsink /
    fan kits:

    http://www.startech.com/product/itemlist.aspx?product_desc=fan 775&search..x=0&search.y=0

    And some models might have better performance than your original.
    smlunatick, Apr 28, 2009
    #2
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  3. pg

    JR Weiss Guest

    "smlunatick" <> wrote...

    > If the heatsink / fan is so mucked up with grime, I would consider
    > locating a "replacement" heatsink / fan assembly. A quick search on a
    > known parts web site (www.startech.com) comes up with 4 new heatsink / fan
    > kits:


    I agree. Since you already have the old heat sink off the CPU, most of the
    hard work is done.

    Some require removing the motherboard to fix a mounting plate on the
    underside, but there are several that do not require MoBo removal:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835119092

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835150056
    JR Weiss, Apr 28, 2009
    #3
  4. pg

    veesubotee Guest

    "Jan Alter" <> wrote in message
    news:gt6oj2$1l82$...
    >
    >
    >
    > "pg" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    >> is very dusty.
    >>
    >> So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    >> fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >>
    >> In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    >> heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    >> dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >>
    >> The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    >> of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    >> can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >>
    >> This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    >> between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >>
    >> I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >>
    >> If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >>
    >> So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >>
    >> 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    >> without breaking anything?
    >>
    >> 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    >> grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >>
    >> Please advise.
    >>
    >> Thank you !!

    >
    >
    > I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    > compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    > can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.


    When the warm/hot weather arrives (now), I usually find my processor fan
    periodically switching to overdrive. In the past, I used a straightened
    paper clip to 'pick' out the lint between the fins. I just did my check; no
    lint, but probed the fins anyway, then started up the computer (with case
    cover and duct removed and blew out whatever was inside. Seems to be
    running cooler now with no overdrive.

    Relating to the OPs post, I once read somewhere that blowing compressed air
    into a computer would place a static charge on the innards. I do wear a
    wrist strap while cleaning the fins, but wonder about using compressed air.

    What do you think, Jan?

    HankG
    veesubotee, Apr 28, 2009
    #4
  5. pg

    spodosaurus Guest

    Jan Alter wrote:
    > "pg" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    >> is very dusty.
    >>
    >> So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    >> fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >>
    >> In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    >> heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    >> dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >>
    >> The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    >> of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    >> can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >>
    >> This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    >> between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >>
    >> I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >>
    >> If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >>
    >> So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >>
    >> 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    >> without breaking anything?
    >>
    >> 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    >> grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >>
    >> Please advise.
    >>
    >> Thank you !!

    >
    >
    > I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    > compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    > can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.


    Canned air and an antistatic brush, repeat as necessary.

    Ari

    --
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    volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
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    spodosaurus, Apr 28, 2009
    #5
  6. pg

    Guest

    "Jan Alter" <> wrote:

    >I've heard that said to using a vacuum cleaner,being that a motor is running
    >and building a charge, but not of the compressed air.


    It's not the motor, it's the air blowing past the parts that causes a
    static charge to build up - just keep it plugged in (wall plug) it
    will discharge itself if a problem.

    Never heard of CA causing a static charge, but it would be the same
    principle as a vacuum and wearing a static strap isn't going to have
    any affect at all.
    --

    http://whybenormal.today.com/files/2009/04/no-matter-what.jpg
    , Apr 28, 2009
    #6
  7. pg

    Guest

    spodosaurus <spodosaurus@_yahoo_.com> wrote:

    >> I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    >> compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    >> can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.


    >Canned air and an antistatic brush, repeat as necessary.


    Sounds like I have the same setup (heatsink/fan) and that's how I do
    it. Canned air and one of those brushes that come with hair cutting
    kits.

    My fan is connected - heck still in the computer, I just push the
    brush thru the fan and into the heat sink move it around, then spray
    with air, repeat.



    --

    http://whybenormal.today.com/files/2009/04/no-matter-what.jpg
    , Apr 28, 2009
    #7
  8. pg

    GMAN Guest

    In article <gt6oj2$1l82$>, "Jan Alter" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >"pg" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    >> is very dusty.
    >>
    >> So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    >> fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >>
    >> In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    >> heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    >> dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >>
    >> The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    >> of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    >> can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >>
    >> This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    >> between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >>
    >> I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >>
    >> If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >>
    >> So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >>
    >> 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    >> without breaking anything?
    >>
    >> 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    >> grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >>
    >> Please advise.
    >>
    >> Thank you !!

    >
    >
    >I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    >compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    >can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.


    Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air compressor
    like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools. FOr around $100-$150, you
    can get the job done with ease.



    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40400
    GMAN, Apr 28, 2009
    #8
  9. pg

    smlunatick Guest

    On Apr 28, 3:01 pm, "JR Weiss" <> wrote:
    > "smlunatick" <> wrote...
    > > If the heatsink / fan is so mucked up with grime, I would consider
    > > locating a "replacement" heatsink / fan assembly.  A quick search on a
    > > known parts web site (www.startech.com) comes up with 4 new heatsink / fan
    > > kits:

    >
    > I agree.  Since you already have the old heat sink off the CPU, most of the
    > hard work is done.
    >
    > Some require removing the motherboard to fix a mounting plate on the
    > underside, but there are several that do not require MoBo removal:
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835119092
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835150056


    Especially that the fan has a place where we can not access with most
    brushes. The fan "spinner" is extremely "fragile" and most brushes
    are not easily pushed through the sight gap.
    smlunatick, Apr 28, 2009
    #9
  10. pg

    olfart Guest

    "GMAN" <> wrote in message
    news:qgHJl.218322$1.easynews.com...
    > In article <gt6oj2$1l82$>, "Jan Alter"
    > <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >><snip>
    >>>

    >>I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    >>compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    >>can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.

    >
    > Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air
    > compressor
    > like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools. FOr around $100-$150,
    > you
    > can get the job done with ease.
    >
    >
    >

    120psi can do all kinds of damage to a computers innards and the air from a
    compressor can contain moisture as well as oil and other traces of crap
    Stick to the canned air
    olfart, Apr 28, 2009
    #10
  11. pg

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, "olfart" <> wrote:
    >
    >"GMAN" <> wrote in message
    >news:qgHJl.218322$1.easynews.com...
    >> In article <gt6oj2$1l82$>, "Jan Alter"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>><snip>
    >>>>
    >>>I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    >>>compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    >>>can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.

    >>
    >> Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air
    >> compressor
    >> like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools. FOr around $100-$150,
    >> you
    >> can get the job done with ease.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >120psi can do all kinds of damage to a computers innards and the air from a
    >compressor can contain moisture as well as oil and other traces of crap
    >Stick to the canned air
    >
    >

    Oh my god, you "DO" realize that you can adjust these from 0 psi all the way
    to 120 psi???? I never leave my compressor on the highest setting, just enough
    for the grinder, or sprayer, or tool i am using at the time!!!!!!!

    And anyone with more than shit for brains uses an oil/air filter on their
    lines!!!!!!!!
    GMAN, Apr 28, 2009
    #11
  12. pg

    GMAN Guest

    In article <gt7mnp$75c$>, "Jan Alter" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>> 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    >>>> without breaking anything?
    >>>>
    >>>> 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    >>>> grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >>>>
    >>>> Please advise.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you !!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I use a can of compressed air. To get the fins of the HSF I use the same
    >>>compressed air with the straw attached to the nozzle that comes with the
    >>>can. Seems to get rid of even the most reluctant schmutz.

    >>
    >> Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air
    >> compressor
    >> like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools. FOr around $100-$150,
    >> you
    >> can get the job done with ease.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40400

    >
    >
    >$129 !! LOL .
    >
    >
    > For the amount of cleaning I do I'll stick with the $10 can of CA.


    FIne, but you can get smaller compressors. I just listed a do all type that
    could be used for cleaning crap like PC's all the way up to running tools in
    their warehouse.

    You can get smaller ones for $50


    So quit LOL at others posts before you step back and look at the big picture
    for the OP. They said it was in a warehouse, i assumed it would be handy for
    other uses too.



    BTW, that $10 can of air is a ripoff.
    GMAN, Apr 28, 2009
    #12
  13. pg

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 17:44:52 GMT, (GMAN)
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air compressor
    >>like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools. FOr around $100-$150, you
    >>can get the job done with ease.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40400

    >
    >If you need an air compressor for other tasks or just like
    >to collect tools, then maybe it's a good option but would be
    >ridiculous overkill for cleaning out computer fans, and it
    >would take longer to go get the compressor and move it to
    >the computer (or vice-versa) than having a can of compressed
    >air or a paintbrush in the drawer or shelf nearby so it can
    >be used in a few seconds.

    Its not rediculous when if like me, you work on over 20 PC's a month for
    people. Just one month of work using a case of cans of air would cost more
    than the compressor and wouldnt do half as good of a job as the small air
    compressor i use.
    GMAN, Apr 29, 2009
    #13
  14. pg

    GMAN Guest

    In article <>, wrote:
    >On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 12:15:25 -0700 (PDT), smlunatick
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>On Apr 28, 3:01 pm, "JR Weiss" <> wrote:
    >>> "smlunatick" <> wrote...
    >>> > If the heatsink / fan is so mucked up with grime, I would consider
    >>> > locating a "replacement" heatsink / fan assembly.  A quick search on a
    >>> > known parts web site (www.startech.com) comes up with 4 new heatsink / fan
    >>> > kits:
    >>>
    >>> I agree.  Since you already have the old heat sink off the CPU, most of the
    >>> hard work is done.
    >>>
    >>> Some require removing the motherboard to fix a mounting plate on the
    >>> underside, but there are several that do not require MoBo removal:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134
    >>>
    >>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835119092
    >>>
    >>> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835150056

    >>
    >>Especially that the fan has a place where we can not access with most
    >>brushes. The fan "spinner" is extremely "fragile" and most brushes
    >>are not easily pushed through the sight gap.

    >
    >It is very rare to find a fan that can't be cleaned out with
    >the smallest size artists brushes. It is possible you might
    >only get 90% of the dust out instead of 99%, but it doesn't
    >have to be clean enough to eat off of.

    So tell me, where does the dust go once you paint brush it into the power
    supply etc????
    GMAN, Apr 29, 2009
    #14
  15. pg

    PeeCee Guest

    "pg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    > is very dusty.
    >
    > So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    > fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >
    > In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    > heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    > dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >
    > The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    > of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    > can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >
    > This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    > between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >
    > I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >
    > If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >
    > So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >
    > 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    > without breaking anything?
    >
    > 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    > grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >
    > Please advise.
    >
    > Thank you !!




    P9 No need to remove the HS/Fan, I've used an air compressor for many years
    to do this job.

    Tricks to note are.
    1 Use a plastic 'stick' to stop fans rotating. Spinning them up beyond their
    normal speed often causes the bearing to start chattering at next switch on
    (dry phosphor bronze bushes)
    2 Heaviest dust is usually in the CPU Fan and Power Supply, do them first
    and predislodge with a long bristled brush. I use a basting brush from my
    local $2 shop.
    3 Fan location: Power supply, CPU, Sometimes Graphics card, sometimes front
    & back of case and sometimes motherboard chipsets.
    4 Do it outside, you don't know what the dust contains.
    5 Watch for labels blowing off, check them in case they need to be re
    attached (model numbers etc)

    The hardest ones to get clean are those close to kitchens or other
    envronments with a lot of fat or oils in the air, but the air pressure
    should be enough to clear them.

    Printers can be cleared with air to, just watch for small flappy bits of
    plastic.

    After blowing out wipe with soft rag to mop up surface dust.

    Lube CD/DVD trays and printer sliding parts afterwards with Silicon spray to
    improve workability.

    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Apr 29, 2009
    #15
  16. pg

    Jon Danniken Guest

    "GMAN" wrote:
    > "olfart" wrote:
    >>120psi can do all kinds of damage to a computers innards and the air from
    >>a
    >>compressor can contain moisture as well as oil and other traces of crap
    >>Stick to the canned air
    >>
    >>

    > Oh my god, you "DO" realize that you can adjust these from 0 psi all the
    > way
    > to 120 psi???? I never leave my compressor on the highest setting, just
    > enough
    > for the grinder, or sprayer, or tool i am using at the time!!!!!!!


    I've been using my old Coast to Coast air compressor to clean out computers
    here for 15 years now. It has a regulator, but the output is on 120PSI, and
    have *never* had any problems with it on the hundreds of boxes that have
    passed through here.

    Jon
    Jon Danniken, Apr 29, 2009
    #16
  17. "pg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that place
    > is very dusty.
    >
    > So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    > fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.
    >
    > In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    > heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    > dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.
    >
    > The cooling fan / heatsink assembly is joint together by 4 washer type
    > of stoppers (located almost at the half way down the 4 screws) and I
    > can't find a way to separate the fan from the heatsink.
    >
    > This resulted in the THICK LAYER of grime and dust that are stuck in
    > between the fan and the heatsink to be totally inaccessible.
    >
    > I tried my best to clean them out but couldn't.
    >
    > If only I can separate the fan OUT from the heatsink assembly ....
    >
    > So, to the hardware gurus here ---
    >
    > 1. Is there a way to take out the fan from the fan/heatsink assembly,
    > without breaking anything?
    >
    > 2. If the answer to #1 is NO, then, is there a way to clean out the
    > grimes that stuck in between the fan and the heatsink?
    >
    > Please advise.
    >
    > Thank you !!





    You'll notice a "slot" in the top of each "leg" where the heatsink attaches
    to the motherboard.
    Using a flat-bladed screwdriver rotate each leg 90 degrees counterclockwise.
    This will release the heatsink from the motherboard, facilitating removal.

    After you clean all the gunk from the heatsink and the surrounding area on
    the motherboard,
    rotate the heatsink retainers 90 degrees clockwise by hand.

    Position the heatsink on the CPU aligning the legs with the holes in the
    motherboard.
    Firmly depress each leg until it "clicks" into place.
    Be certain to reattach the heatsink fan power wire.

    Good luck.


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    Colon Terminus, Apr 30, 2009
    #17
  18. pg

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs kony wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 04:05:53 -0700 (PDT), pg
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> One of the company PC is located in the warehouse area, and that
    >> place is very dusty.
    >>
    >> So dusty that a lot of grime have built up in the heatsink + cooling
    >> fan, and the CPU temperature is rising as a result.

    >
    > What is the grime comprised of exactly? If it is just a lot
    > of dust, it can be blown out or use a small paint brush. If
    > it is gunk like grease from a kitchen, tobacco smoke, or
    > other gunk like industrial residue then you may need a
    > liquid cleaner for best results (having first removed the
    > fan, and possibly heatsink too depending on how bad they
    > are).
    >
    >> In the process of cleaning the PC, I disassembled the cooling fan +
    >> heatsink assembly from the CPU, trying my best to clean away all the
    >> dust and grime stuck on the heatsink and the cooling fan.

    >
    > You make it sound really bad. If there is that much dust
    > you may have an environmental problem, that much gunk and
    > dust in the air is bad for the users as well as the computer
    > so I would suggest a room air cleaner, more frequent
    > vacuuming or sweeping, and if this isn't enough then also a
    > case air filter or even a different case if the one used
    > cannot accomodate filters.


    [snip]

    He says "in the warehouse area". Makes me think of diesel forklifts etc....
    --
    Shaun.

    "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    ~misfit~, Apr 30, 2009
    #18
  19. pg

    jinxy Guest

    On Apr 29, 1:12 am, (GMAN) wrote:
    > In article <>, wrote:
    > >On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 17:44:52 GMT, (GMAN)
    > >wrote:

    >
    > >>Rather than a low pressure can of compressed air, invest in an air compressor
    > >>like the ones they sell at Harbor Freight Tools.   FOr around $100-$150, you
    > >>can get the job done with ease.

    >
    > >>http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40400

    >
    > >If you need an air compressor for other tasks or just like
    > >to collect tools, then maybe it's a good option but would be
    > >ridiculous overkill for cleaning out computer fans, and it
    > >would take longer to go get the compressor and move it to
    > >the computer (or vice-versa) than having a can of compressed
    > >air or a paintbrush in the drawer or shelf nearby so it can
    > >be used in a few seconds.

    >
    > Its not rediculous when if like me, you work on over 20 PC's a month for
    > people. Just one month of work using a case of cans of air would cost more
    > than the compressor and wouldnt do half as good of a job as the small air
    > compressor i use.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I know this will sound crazy but I have cleaned out a heatsink with a
    bicycle pump and a ball inflation needle. It fits great into the
    heatsink slots and localizes the air pressure. Try it, worked for me.
    -J
    jinxy, May 2, 2009
    #19
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