How to Burn CD w/JPEG Images for Cross Platform Use?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by F. Hayek, Nov 16, 2004.

  1. F. Hayek

    F. Hayek Guest

    My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred
     
    F. Hayek, Nov 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    "F. Hayek" <> wrote:

    > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred


    The basic format of a CD is standardized. OS-specific information, used
    by both MacOS and Windows, is an extension to the format that can be
    ignored when reading the disc.

    OS X has succumbed to the use of clumsy file extensions so you don't
    need to worry about the filenames.
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Nov 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. "F. Hayek" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred


    Surprise surprise - CDs are standardized. PC and Mac CDs are the same.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 16, 2004
    #3
  4. "F. Hayek" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred


    ---------

    On the Mac - physically NAME the file with the correct Windows extension
    [.jpg; ,tif; ect] - AND - burn the disk in ISO9660-level1 (8+3 name
    convention) mode.

    Going the other way, the extension will already be on the Win file so all
    you need to do is burn to ISO9660-level1 (8+3 name convention) mode.

    In BOTH cases close/finalise the disk (burn as "disk at once")

    Journalist
     
    Journalist-North, Nov 16, 2004
    #4
  5. F. Hayek

    YAG-ART Guest

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 23:55:11 -0600, "F. Hayek"
    <> wrote:

    >My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    >to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    >Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    >CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    >Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred



    CD's are universal so you just need to burn a CD
     
    YAG-ART, Nov 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Hi

    Nope. Nothing special you need to do. Just burn the JPEG images on a
    CD and you can view em on either a Mac or PC (preferably with Mac OS
    10+ and Windows XP).

    Best Regards
    Gary
    www.basic-digital-photography.com


    "F. Hayek" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred
     
    Gary Hendricks, Nov 16, 2004
    #6
  7. F. Hayek

    F. Hayek Guest

    In article <>,
    Kevin McMurtrie <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > "F. Hayek" <> wrote:
    >
    > > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred

    >
    > The basic format of a CD is standardized. OS-specific information, used
    > by both MacOS and Windows, is an extension to the format that can be
    > ignored when reading the disc.
    >
    > OS X has succumbed to the use of clumsy file extensions so you don't
    > need to worry about the filenames.



    Thanks to all for the helpful responses.

    I burned one .jpg file onto a CD-R, as a test, and learned that once you
    burn anything onto a CD-R it's finished. Big waste of that disk <LOL>!
    -- Fred
     
    F. Hayek, Nov 16, 2004
    #7
  8. "Gary Hendricks" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > Nope. Nothing special you need to do. Just burn the JPEG images on a
    > CD and you can view em on either a Mac or PC (preferably with Mac OS
    > 10+ and Windows XP).
    >
    > Best Regards
    > Gary
    > www.basic-digital-photography.com



    But in fact the CD format hasn't changed for a decade or more.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Nov 16, 2004
    #8
  9. "F. Hayek" <> writes:

    > I burned one .jpg file onto a CD-R, as a test, and learned that once you
    > burn anything onto a CD-R it's finished. Big waste of that disk <LOL>!


    That's true if you drag and drop in the Mac OS. You need a non-Apple
    program to burn to disks without closing the volume (Toast, for example).

    Either write enough to fill the disk, accept that you'll be burning less
    than full disks, or get a program. Google lists several such programs other
    than Toast.

    --
    Phil Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
    The Civilized Explorer | spam and read later. email to philip@
    http://www.cieux.com/ | my domain is read daily.
     
    Phil Stripling, Nov 16, 2004
    #9
  10. F. Hayek

    Hunt Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    >In article <>,
    > Kevin McMurtrie <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> "F. Hayek" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    >> > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    >> > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    >> > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    >> > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred

    >>
    >> The basic format of a CD is standardized. OS-specific information, used
    >> by both MacOS and Windows, is an extension to the format that can be
    >> ignored when reading the disc.
    >>
    >> OS X has succumbed to the use of clumsy file extensions so you don't
    >> need to worry about the filenames.

    >
    >
    >Thanks to all for the helpful responses.
    >
    >I burned one .jpg file onto a CD-R, as a test, and learned that once you
    >burn anything onto a CD-R it's finished. Big waste of that disk <LOL>!
    >-- Fred


    Since blank CD's are cheap (I know it hurts to have all that blank real
    estate, but... ) it is best to "finalize" the CD, regardless of what software
    /method you choose. Otherwise the lab's CD drive may well not be able to read
    from it. You could add to it on YOUR machine, but incompatibilites between
    drives/machines/OSs/software could yield a CD that only YOU could read from.
    One caveat is to check the lab's drive capabilities as there are -R & +R, and
    with older drives, they will not work in crossR situations. Most newer drives
    are dual and can do either/both.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Nov 16, 2004
    #10
  11. F. Hayek

    Guest

    In comp.sys.mac.misc Gary Hendricks <> wrote:
    : Nope. Nothing special you need to do. Just burn the JPEG images on a
    : CD and you can view em on either a Mac or PC (preferably with Mac OS
    : 10+ and Windows XP).

    Actually you can view them on all sorts of other platforms as well,
    e.g. unix boxen.
     
    , Nov 16, 2004
    #11
  12. F. Hayek

    Mike Guest

    In article <>,
    Kevin McMurtrie <> wrote:

    > OS X has succumbed to the use of clumsy file extensions so you don't
    > need to worry about the filenames.


    Thank God. Now the Mac is compatible with the rest of the world!

    Mike
     
    Mike, Nov 17, 2004
    #12
  13. F. Hayek

    secheese Guest

    On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 10:19:38 -0600, "F. Hayek"
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > Kevin McMurtrie <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> "F. Hayek" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    >> > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    >> > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    >> > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    >> > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred

    >>
    >> The basic format of a CD is standardized. OS-specific information, used
    >> by both MacOS and Windows, is an extension to the format that can be
    >> ignored when reading the disc.
    >>
    >> OS X has succumbed to the use of clumsy file extensions so you don't
    >> need to worry about the filenames.

    >
    >
    >Thanks to all for the helpful responses.
    >
    >I burned one .jpg file onto a CD-R, as a test, and learned that once you
    >burn anything onto a CD-R it's finished. Big waste of that disk <LOL>!


    Not true. Until you "close" the disk, you can write more data to the
    unburned portion.
     
    secheese, Nov 17, 2004
    #13
  14. F. Hayek

    Matt Ion Guest

    F. Hayek wrote:

    > My computer is a macintosh G4 running OS 10.2 with a CD burner. I want
    > to transfer some image files to CD so I can run them down to the local
    > Walgreens for photo quality prints. Do I just burn JPEG images onto the
    > CD or is there some type of format I have to use so that the PC at
    > Walgreens will recognize them? -- Fred


    Just make sure your burner software (Toast? other?) is set to burn as
    ISO-9660, which is the CD-ROM "standard" format, rather than Mac format.
    Keep in mind that filenames are limited to 8+3 DOS format unless you
    use Joliet extensions (which MAY limit compatibility to newer Windows
    systems).
     
    Matt Ion, Nov 17, 2004
    #14
  15. "secheese" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 10:19:38 -0600, "F. Hayek"


    (snip)
    >
    > Not true. Until you "close" the disk, you can write more data to the
    > unburned portion.
    >

    ---------

    True, and to do this it is best to use proper burning software (such as
    NERO) burning as a multi-session until you choose to finalise / close the
    disk when it then becomes fixed and no more can be added.

    ISO9660 multi-session tracks will open on either Win or Mac platforms even
    if the disk is not finalised / closed.

    Journalist
     
    Journalist-North, Nov 17, 2004
    #15
  16. F. Hayek

    Terence Guest

    "F. Hayek" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    [snip]
    >
    > I burned one .jpg file onto a CD-R, as a test, and learned that once you
    > burn anything onto a CD-R it's finished. Big waste of that disk <LOL>!
    > -- Fred


    If you're burning jpegs to a CD for archival purposes, by all means
    use a CD-R. But if you're only transferring images to a CD so you can
    take it to your local store to get prints made, just use a rewritable
    CD.

    It's true that blank cds don't cost that much in the first place, but
    this just saves having to waste blanks when one RW disc is really all
    you need.
     
    Terence, Nov 17, 2004
    #16
  17. "Michael A. Covington" <> writes:

    >Surprise surprise - CDs are standardized. PC and Mac CDs are the same.


    Well, yes and no. If you burn an ISO 9660-format CD with only data
    files on it, everything ought to be able to read it. And that's all you
    need for taking images to a photo store.

    But there is (or at least used to be) a Mac-specific CD format that
    allowed a Mac-style filesystem on the disc, complete with executables
    containing resource and data forks, 4-letter codes for each file, etc.
    If you wanted to sell an *application* that worked for both Mac and PC,
    you'd build a special disc containing a Mac filesystem and a standard
    ISO one in different areas on the disk.

    I don't know if OS X still does something like this; I left the Mac
    world some time ago.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Nov 17, 2004
    #17
  18. F. Hayek

    Matt Ion Guest

    Journalist-North wrote:


    > True, and to do this it is best to use proper burning software (such as
    > NERO) burning as a multi-session until you choose to finalise / close
    > the disk when it then becomes fixed and no more can be added.


    The OP was working on a Mac; there is no version of Nero for MacOS.

    > ISO9660 multi-session tracks will open on either Win or Mac platforms
    > even if the disk is not finalised / closed.
    >
    > Journalist
     
    Matt Ion, Nov 18, 2004
    #18
  19. "Matt Ion" <> wrote in message
    news:c8Ymd.257112$%k.234527@pd7tw2no...
    > Journalist-North wrote:
    >
    >
    >> True, and to do this it is best to use proper burning software (such as
    >> NERO) burning as a multi-session until you choose to finalise / close the
    >> disk when it then becomes fixed and no more can be added.

    >
    > The OP was working on a Mac; there is no version of Nero for MacOS.


    Understood... but there are, ISTR, other burner options for Mac. I work on
    both platforms - Win on my own office systems and Mac in the newsroom so am
    used to cross-platforming all kinds of "stuff" and across several different
    applications. If it were up to me I would shove the Macs to the floor [or
    just put a hammer through them and get it over with] and get in competent
    Win / PC systems throughout.

    Was on an outside assignment last week with three Mac systems of different
    vintages... the techies networked them together and left... fifteen minutes
    later the whole thing when to s**t. The Macs are a right pain in the butt!

    >> Journalist
     
    Journalist-North, Nov 18, 2004
    #19
  20. In article <SD4nd.2042$>,
    "Journalist-North" <> wrote:

    > "Matt Ion" <> wrote in message
    > news:c8Ymd.257112$%k.234527@pd7tw2no...
    > > Journalist-North wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> True, and to do this it is best to use proper burning software (such as
    > >> NERO) burning as a multi-session until you choose to finalise / close the
    > >> disk when it then becomes fixed and no more can be added.

    > >
    > > The OP was working on a Mac; there is no version of Nero for MacOS.

    >
    > Understood... but there are, ISTR, other burner options for Mac. I work on
    > both platforms - Win on my own office systems and Mac in the newsroom so am
    > used to cross-platforming all kinds of "stuff" and across several different
    > applications. If it were up to me I would shove the Macs to the floor [or
    > just put a hammer through them and get it over with] and get in competent
    > Win / PC systems throughout.
    >
    > Was on an outside assignment last week with three Mac systems of different
    > vintages... the techies networked them together and left... fifteen minutes
    > later the whole thing when to s**t. The Macs are a right pain in the butt!


    Sounds like the "techies" weren't. Anything can be a pain in the butt if
    it's not configured correctly. There's no reason for a properly set up
    network to behave like that regardless of what systems are
    participating. We've got one Mac in the office that we brought in for a
    particular task that we couldn't reasonably accomplish with another
    platform, and I don't think we've had, or needed to have, a support
    visit on it in years.

    G

    --
    Change account to gw when responding by mail.
     
    Gregory Weston, Nov 18, 2004
    #20
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