How to break a long page into multi pages

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by noauth, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. noauth

    noauth Guest

    If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    not-so-fancy. :eek:)
     
    noauth, Aug 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. noauth

    Ari Heino Guest

    noauth kirjoitti seuraavasti:
    > If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    > little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    > manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    > HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > not-so-fancy. :eek:)


    What do you mean by "page length"? There is no pages in web as there are
    in books. As said googolplexian times, web != printed media.

    In css there are some attributes (or whatever was the right word) you
    could control html when printed, but the browsers' support for those is
    next to nothing.
     
    Ari Heino, Aug 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. noauth

    freemont Guest

    On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200, noauth writ:

    > If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    > little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    > manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    > HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > not-so-fancy. :eek:)


    Sure, just break it into separate pages. You really only have to make one
    page at first, then cut-n-paste the sections into the bodies of the other
    pages. Link to the pages from each other.

    <h1>First Page</h1>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p style="text-align:center;font-weight:bold"><a href="page2.htm">page 2</
    a><a href="page3.htm">page 3</a></p>

    <h1>Second Page</h1>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p>...........</p>
    <p style="text-align:center;font-weight:bold"><a href="page1.htm">page 1</
    a><a href="page3.htm">page 3</a></p>

    And so on. You get the idea. :)

    --
    "Because all you of Earth are idiots!"
    ¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·-> freemont© <-·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯
     
    freemont, Aug 13, 2009
    #3
  4. In alt.html, noauth wrote:

    > If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only
    > a little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the
    > text manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of
    > simple HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > not-so-fancy. :eek:)


    And what of my monitor, with a higher resolution? Do you write
    fixed-width pages? What will you expect to see on a wide-screen
    monitor?

    Remember, there are two things that even the most rank novice knows how
    to do in a browser: hit the Back Button, and scroll vertically.

    That said, if you don't use any kind of server-side processing, yes, you
    would have to break manually, and futz with <-Previous and Next->
    buttons or links.

    To me, reading a few paragraphs, then having to switch to a new page is
    counter-productive to the "flow" of an article. My mouse wheel works
    just fine.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Aug 13, 2009
    #4
  5. noauth

    Lars Eighner Guest

    In our last episode,
    <>, the lovely and
    talented noauth broadcast on alt.html:

    > If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    > little past a screen resolution of 1024x768,


    Obviously you have missed the entire point of HTML.

    > do I have to break the text
    > manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    > HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > not-so-fancy. :eek:)


    Tidy will break pages on H2 Nothing will do it on word count, screen size,
    or any other nonsense stemming from the thought that every browser is just
    like mine running on a computer just like mine.

    --
    Lars Eighner <http://larseighner.com/> September 5826, 1993
    204 days since Rick Warren prayed over Bush's third term.
    Obama: No hope, no change, more of the same. Yes, he can, but no, he won't.
     
    Lars Eighner, Aug 13, 2009
    #5
  6. noauth

    John Hosking Guest

    Followup-To set to alt.html

    On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth wrote:

    > If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    > little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    > manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    > HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > not-so-fancy. :eek:)


    Eew. Well, okay, I'll play along...

    If you really want to set the content to fit on one or more pages,
    constrained by displayed length (which I advise against), and you really
    believe that you can achieve some certain, predictable length (which you
    can't), then why are you trying for a length just *over* the screen length.
    Why not aim (in your quixotic way) for a length that might fit entirely on
    the screen (assuming maximized browser, few toolbars, etc.) without any
    vertical scroll bar?

    I mean, as long as you're dreaming, why not dream something worthwhile?

    --
    John
    You didn't mention what font size I'll be using.
     
    John Hosking, Aug 13, 2009
    #6
  7. noauth

    noauth Guest

    On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:36:46 +0100, Martin Jay <>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    >>little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    >>manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    >>HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    >>not-so-fancy. :eek:)

    >
    >Do you mean similar to the way the large, amusing, article at
    ><http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/29/aboxalypse_now/> has been
    >spanned across five pages?


    No. I'm not that clever. :eek:)

    I just was wondering if reading one loooonnnng page would bug some people.

    >Probably the easiest way to achieve this is to manually break it up.
    >
    >But you might want to ask yourself why you wish to do so. I suspect
    >it's often done to increase ad revenue.


    Exactly what I noticed on many sites. Those sites are a pain, and I
    usually avoid them when I come across them. They are frustrating and
    ridiculous.

    snip.
    >
    >Oh, and don't forget that not everyone uses a screen resolution of
    >1024x768 - wide screen monitors, for example, are quite common now.
    >And even those use a resolution of 1024x768 may use a smaller or
    >larger font size than you and have additional screen furniture.


    I am aware those problems.

    I guess I'll just make a single page of any article. It's simpler.

    Thanks for answering my post.

    (Thanks to all others who answered, too.)
     
    noauth, Aug 13, 2009
    #7
  8. noauth wrote:
    > On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:36:46 +0100, Martin Jay <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    >>> little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    >>> manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    >>> HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    >>> not-so-fancy. :eek:)

    >> Do you mean similar to the way the large, amusing, article at
    >> <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/29/aboxalypse_now/> has been
    >> spanned across five pages?

    >
    > No. I'm not that clever. :eek:)
    >
    > I just was wondering if reading one loooonnnng page would bug some people.


    If it would bug them to read it, then it will bug them more if they have
    to keep clicking links to read more of it. Why would it bug them less?
    And having it all on one page makes it easier to scan the article, or to
    go back and refer to a part one has already read.
     
    Harlan Messinger, Aug 13, 2009
    #8
  9. noauth

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Harlan Messinger <> wrote:

    > noauth wrote:
    > > On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:36:46 +0100, Martin Jay <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    > >>> little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    > >>> manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    > >>> HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    > >>> not-so-fancy. :eek:)
    > >> Do you mean similar to the way the large, amusing, article at
    > >> <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/29/aboxalypse_now/> has been
    > >> spanned across five pages?

    > >
    > > No. I'm not that clever. :eek:)
    > >
    > > I just was wondering if reading one loooonnnng page would bug some people.

    >
    > If it would bug them to read it, then it will bug them more if they have
    > to keep clicking links to read more of it. Why would it bug them less?
    > And having it all on one page makes it easier to scan the article, or to
    > go back and refer to a part one has already read.


    And to search it with Command F or whatever the Windows and other OS
    equivalents are.

    The OP might consider the nature of the article or presentation. For
    example, no matter how long an article like:

    <http://members.optushome.com.au/droovies/opinion/drugLaws.html>

    was, within reason, it is probably best in one HTML doc. "Within reason"
    is a caveat, and it requires a little judgement here, for file size. If
    it has no pictures, it can be *quite long* without being a burden to
    even dial up.

    But if it so very big that it becomes download nuisance or if it has a
    menu with internal links and distinctive parts, there might be
    advantages in splitting it up.

    One advantage would be for a user to be able to open up different
    sections easily in tabs or windows simultaneously. Another would be to
    be able to refer people to a pertinent part, a simple URL doing directly.

    It all depends!

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Aug 14, 2009
    #9
  10. noauth

    Justin Guest

    noauth wrote on [Thu, 13 Aug 2009 18:55:45 +0200 (CEST)]:
    > On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:36:46 +0100, Martin Jay <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    >>>little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    >>>manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    >>>HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    >>>not-so-fancy. :eek:)

    >>
    >>Do you mean similar to the way the large, amusing, article at
    >><http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/29/aboxalypse_now/> has been
    >>spanned across five pages?

    >
    > No. I'm not that clever. :eek:)
    >
    > I just was wondering if reading one loooonnnng page would bug some people.
    >
    >>Probably the easiest way to achieve this is to manually break it up.
    >>
    >>But you might want to ask yourself why you wish to do so. I suspect
    >>it's often done to increase ad revenue.

    >
    > Exactly what I noticed on many sites. Those sites are a pain, and I
    > usually avoid them when I come across them. They are frustrating and
    > ridiculous.


    Exactly! You're wanting to do the same thing.

    IME, most reasons to split an article up like this are to increase
    hitcount or ad views.
     
    Justin, Aug 14, 2009
    #10
  11. noauth

    John Hosking Guest

    Followup-To set to alt.html

    On Fri, 14 Aug 2009 09:46:06 +1000, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Harlan Messinger <> wrote:
    >
    >> noauth wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:36:46 +0100, Martin Jay <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Thu, 13 Aug 2009 14:24:25 +0200 (CEST), noauth
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> If I am writing a long article and want to have a page length of only a
    >>>>> little past a screen resolution of 1024x768, do I have to break the text
    >>>>> manually, and then manually start a new page? I'm speaking of simple
    >>>>> HTML coding, nothing fancy. I'm having enough problems with
    >>>>> not-so-fancy. :eek:)
    >>>> Do you mean similar to the way the large, amusing, article at
    >>>> <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/29/aboxalypse_now/> has been
    >>>> spanned across five pages?
    >>>
    >>> No. I'm not that clever. :eek:)
    >>>
    >>> I just was wondering if reading one loooonnnng page would bug some people.

    >>
    >> If it would bug them to read it, then it will bug them more if they have
    >> to keep clicking links to read more of it. Why would it bug them less?
    >> And having it all on one page makes it easier to scan the article, or to
    >> go back and refer to a part one has already read.

    >
    > And to search it with Command F or whatever the Windows and other OS
    > equivalents are.


    (Windows: Ctrl+F)

    And to print the article with a minimum of wasted paper (like half-empty
    sheets at the end of each part).

    --
    John
     
    John Hosking, Aug 14, 2009
    #11
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