How many questions in 70-271 & 70-272?

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by Elliot, May 22, 2007.

  1. Elliot

    Elliot Guest

    Is the passing score 700/1000?
     
    Elliot, May 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. Elliot

    Jo Guest

    Elliott:

    Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a perfect
    100%.
    --
    Motochick


    "Elliot" wrote:

    > Is the passing score 700/1000?
     
    Jo, May 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Elliot

    Elliot Guest

    Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?


    "Jo" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Elliott:
    >
    > Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    > perfect
    > 100%.
    > --
    > Motochick
    >
    >
    > "Elliot" wrote:
    >
    >> Is the passing score 700/1000?
     
    Elliot, May 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Elliot

    John R Guest

    "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?
    >
    >
    > "Jo" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Elliott:
    >>
    >> Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    >> perfect
    >> 100%.
    >> --
    >> Motochick
    >>
    >>
    >> "Elliot" wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is the passing score 700/1000?


    Microsoft documents that the passing score is 700, although the top score is
    not published for any particular exam. As to the number of questions, that
    is not published either. I would ask what you expect that information to do
    for you? If you know ahead of time that there are three multiple guess
    questions, or three hundred essay questions, how does that help you? You
    should review the exam objectives published on Microsoft's website. If you
    are comfortable with each and every objective, the number of questions, or
    anything else about the test is really of no concern.

    When you take the test, you will be asked (as we all were) to agree to the
    Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Some people take the NDA to mean discussing
    specifics of the exam, ie # of questions, time limits, format of questions,
    question content, etc.

    None of that however, changes the fact that you are either ready for the
    exam or you aren't. And knowing the number of questions does nothing to
    change that. The only measure is "Do you know the objectives or don't you".

    Good luck on your exams. However, if you are prepared, you won't need luck.

    John R.
     
    John R, May 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Elliot

    Elliot Guest

    Hey man, knowing the duration of exam and no. of questions is a part of
    preperation.

    "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?
    >>
    >>
    >> "Jo" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Elliott:
    >>>
    >>> Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    >>> perfect
    >>> 100%.
    >>> --
    >>> Motochick
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Elliot" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Is the passing score 700/1000?

    >
    > Microsoft documents that the passing score is 700, although the top score
    > is not published for any particular exam. As to the number of questions,
    > that is not published either. I would ask what you expect that
    > information to do for you? If you know ahead of time that there are three
    > multiple guess questions, or three hundred essay questions, how does that
    > help you? You should review the exam objectives published on Microsoft's
    > website. If you are comfortable with each and every objective, the number
    > of questions, or anything else about the test is really of no concern.
    >
    > When you take the test, you will be asked (as we all were) to agree to the
    > Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Some people take the NDA to mean
    > discussing specifics of the exam, ie # of questions, time limits, format
    > of questions, question content, etc.
    >
    > None of that however, changes the fact that you are either ready for the
    > exam or you aren't. And knowing the number of questions does nothing to
    > change that. The only measure is "Do you know the objectives or don't
    > you".
    >
    > Good luck on your exams. However, if you are prepared, you won't need
    > luck.
    >
    > John R.
    >
     
    Elliot, May 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Elliot

    Elliot Guest

    preparation


    "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey man, knowing the duration of exam and no. of questions is a part of
    > preperation.
    >
    > "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jo" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Elliott:
    >>>>
    >>>> Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    >>>> perfect
    >>>> 100%.
    >>>> --
    >>>> Motochick
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Elliot" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Is the passing score 700/1000?

    >>
    >> Microsoft documents that the passing score is 700, although the top score
    >> is not published for any particular exam. As to the number of questions,
    >> that is not published either. I would ask what you expect that
    >> information to do for you? If you know ahead of time that there are
    >> three multiple guess questions, or three hundred essay questions, how
    >> does that help you? You should review the exam objectives published on
    >> Microsoft's website. If you are comfortable with each and every
    >> objective, the number of questions, or anything else about the test is
    >> really of no concern.
    >>
    >> When you take the test, you will be asked (as we all were) to agree to
    >> the Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Some people take the NDA to mean
    >> discussing specifics of the exam, ie # of questions, time limits, format
    >> of questions, question content, etc.
    >>
    >> None of that however, changes the fact that you are either ready for the
    >> exam or you aren't. And knowing the number of questions does nothing to
    >> change that. The only measure is "Do you know the objectives or don't
    >> you".
    >>
    >> Good luck on your exams. However, if you are prepared, you won't need
    >> luck.
    >>
    >> John R.
    >>
     
    Elliot, May 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Elliot

    John R Guest

    "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey man, knowing the duration of exam and no. of questions is a part of
    > preperation.
    >
    > "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Jo" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Elliott:
    >>>>
    >>>> Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    >>>> perfect
    >>>> 100%.
    >>>> --
    >>>> Motochick
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Elliot" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Is the passing score 700/1000?

    >>
    >> Microsoft documents that the passing score is 700, although the top score
    >> is not published for any particular exam. As to the number of questions,
    >> that is not published either. I would ask what you expect that
    >> information to do for you? If you know ahead of time that there are
    >> three multiple guess questions, or three hundred essay questions, how
    >> does that help you? You should review the exam objectives published on
    >> Microsoft's website. If you are comfortable with each and every
    >> objective, the number of questions, or anything else about the test is
    >> really of no concern.
    >>
    >> When you take the test, you will be asked (as we all were) to agree to
    >> the Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Some people take the NDA to mean
    >> discussing specifics of the exam, ie # of questions, time limits, format
    >> of questions, question content, etc.
    >>
    >> None of that however, changes the fact that you are either ready for the
    >> exam or you aren't. And knowing the number of questions does nothing to
    >> change that. The only measure is "Do you know the objectives or don't
    >> you".
    >>
    >> Good luck on your exams. However, if you are prepared, you won't need
    >> luck.
    >>
    >> John R.
    >>


    I apologize if you found my reply insulting. It was not meant that way. I
    was simply pointing out the obvious.

    Let's say that I tell you that the exam will consist of three multiple
    choice questions. Does that tell you what you need to know to pass the
    test? It does not tell you what the questions will be about, so you still
    have to study and be prepared for questions on any of the objectives,
    therefore, you must in fact know each of the objectives. OK, let's say
    there are four questions. Does that give you any more information? Let's
    say there are 200 questions? Again, what does that tell you? If you are
    prepared for the exam, it does not matter how many questions there are.
    And, you will also be given the same amount of time to complete the exam as
    every other candidate who has ever taken a test. If you are planning your
    time, then you can call the testing center to find out how much time they
    allot for that exam. For example, if they need to allow you three hours for
    the entire procedure of registering, they will not allow you to schedule the
    test one hour before they close.

    Please explain how this information can provide you with anything more than
    "At least I'll know", which again, does not help you prepare.

    John R.
     
    John R, May 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Elliot

    Elliot Guest

    No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam and
    no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common sense, at
    least for me.


    "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hey man, knowing the duration of exam and no. of questions is a part of
    >> preperation.
    >>
    >> "John R" <jsr^^^813@zoom^^^internet.net> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>
    >>> "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Do you know the number of questions and the time limit for each exam?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Jo" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> Elliott:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Passing score is 700. I don't know what the highest score is for a
    >>>>> perfect
    >>>>> 100%.
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Motochick
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Elliot" wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Is the passing score 700/1000?
    >>>
    >>> Microsoft documents that the passing score is 700, although the top
    >>> score is not published for any particular exam. As to the number of
    >>> questions, that is not published either. I would ask what you expect
    >>> that information to do for you? If you know ahead of time that there
    >>> are three multiple guess questions, or three hundred essay questions,
    >>> how does that help you? You should review the exam objectives published
    >>> on Microsoft's website. If you are comfortable with each and every
    >>> objective, the number of questions, or anything else about the test is
    >>> really of no concern.
    >>>
    >>> When you take the test, you will be asked (as we all were) to agree to
    >>> the Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). Some people take the NDA to mean
    >>> discussing specifics of the exam, ie # of questions, time limits, format
    >>> of questions, question content, etc.
    >>>
    >>> None of that however, changes the fact that you are either ready for the
    >>> exam or you aren't. And knowing the number of questions does nothing to
    >>> change that. The only measure is "Do you know the objectives or don't
    >>> you".
    >>>
    >>> Good luck on your exams. However, if you are prepared, you won't need
    >>> luck.
    >>>
    >>> John R.
    >>>

    >
    > I apologize if you found my reply insulting. It was not meant that way.
    > I was simply pointing out the obvious.
    >
    > Let's say that I tell you that the exam will consist of three multiple
    > choice questions. Does that tell you what you need to know to pass the
    > test? It does not tell you what the questions will be about, so you still
    > have to study and be prepared for questions on any of the objectives,
    > therefore, you must in fact know each of the objectives. OK, let's say
    > there are four questions. Does that give you any more information? Let's
    > say there are 200 questions? Again, what does that tell you? If you are
    > prepared for the exam, it does not matter how many questions there are.
    > And, you will also be given the same amount of time to complete the exam
    > as every other candidate who has ever taken a test. If you are planning
    > your time, then you can call the testing center to find out how much time
    > they allot for that exam. For example, if they need to allow you three
    > hours for the entire procedure of registering, they will not allow you to
    > schedule the test one hour before they close.
    >
    > Please explain how this information can provide you with anything more
    > than "At least I'll know", which again, does not help you prepare.
    >
    > John R.
    >
     
    Elliot, May 22, 2007
    #8
  9. Elliot

    CBIC Guest

    "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    > important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam
    > and no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common
    > sense, at least for me.
    >


    Personally, I don't think it is relevant either but I believe you can call
    the test center to find out the duration. I believe number of questions is
    protected by the NDA, but I could be wrong.
     
    CBIC, May 22, 2007
    #9
  10. Elliot

    Jeff Guest

    I believe it is. Personally, I think that if you are worried about how many
    questions there are then you are not ready. All you need to know is that you
    get plenty of time to finish the exam.

    "CBIC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    >> important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam
    >> and no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common
    >> sense, at least for me.
    >>

    >
    > Personally, I don't think it is relevant either but I believe you can call
    > the test center to find out the duration. I believe number of questions is
    > protected by the NDA, but I could be wrong.
    >
     
    Jeff, May 22, 2007
    #10
  11. Elliot

    catwalker63 Guest

    Elliot piffled away vaguely:

    > No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    > important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam and
    > no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common sense, at
    > least for me.
    >
    >

    It's totally irrelavant to preparation for these exams. If you know
    your stuff, you'll have plenty of time.

    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
     
    catwalker63, May 22, 2007
    #11
  12. Elliot

    David Guest

    I'd be interested in knowing the top score. I've been seeing if I'm prepared
    by taking the various practice test (mostly measureup). It would be nice to
    know if I'm scoring high enough to have a good chance at passing the real
    exam before I lay out the money.
    --
    David DeWitt
    A+, Network+, Security+,70-271


    "catwalker63" wrote:

    > Elliot piffled away vaguely:
    >
    > > No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    > > important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam and
    > > no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common sense, at
    > > least for me.
    > >
    > >

    > It's totally irrelavant to preparation for these exams. If you know
    > your stuff, you'll have plenty of time.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Catwalker
    > MCNGP #43
    > www.mcngp.com
    > "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
    >
    >
     
    David, May 23, 2007
    #12
  13. It is, and it varies, I think we CAN say it is between 45 and 70 questions
    each.
    "CBIC" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Elliot" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> No one would disagee what you have said that knowledge is the most
    >> important. However, I would like to repeat, knowing the duration of exam
    >> and no. of questions is a part of preparation. I think it is a common
    >> sense, at least for me.
    >>

    >
    > Personally, I don't think it is relevant either but I believe you can call
    > the test center to find out the duration. I believe number of questions is
    > protected by the NDA, but I could be wrong.
    >
     
    Michael Gossett, May 23, 2007
    #13
  14. Elliot

    John R Guest

    "David" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'd be interested in knowing the top score. I've been seeing if I'm
    > prepared
    > by taking the various practice test (mostly measureup). It would be nice
    > to
    > know if I'm scoring high enough to have a good chance at passing the real
    > exam before I lay out the money.


    All we really know is that each test is scored differently. How questions
    are weighted, if they are weighted at all, do you get partial credit, do you
    get unused time credit, etc, these things are all unknown. When the test is
    completed, it is scored, and then that score is converted into Microsoft's
    standard scale. On that scale, 700 or better is pass, less than 700 is
    fail. That is as good as it gets. Some (upgrade) tests are pass/fail only,
    and from what I've seen, if you pass, you score 700 on the test no matter
    what.

    Although I've never 'sub-optimized' a test, on tests that I thought I really
    did well on, I've had scores all over the place. On tests that I was a
    little unsure of, I've had scores all over the place. I have heard rumor of
    people getting scores over 1000, although I never did, and I have not
    personally seen a first hand account of such. Even the proctors at the
    testing center would not divulge the range of scores they have seen.

    Although, again, it doesn't matter. The last thing we need around here
    anyway is (if I can borrow a phrase I've seen here before but don't remember
    who to credit it to) a urinary olympics.

    And I still fail to see how any of the test trivia questions helps anyone
    "prepare" for a test. I've never been questioned on a test about what I
    thought the number of questions was, or what a passing score was, or
    anything like that. Although, I was asked on every test to verify that my
    name was correct. (oh no, did I just violate the NDA?)

    John R
     
    John R, May 23, 2007
    #14
  15. Elliot

    TBone Guest

    And on the eigth day "Michael Gossett" <> did
    cause the electrons to come together and form the following words:

    > It is, and it varies, I think we CAN say it is between 45 and 70
    > questions each.


    Which really doesn't help you to prepare because its a broad range and you
    still don't know what kind of questions there are. Come to think of it, I
    didn't even really look at how many question were on my last exam.

    -------

    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
     
    TBone, May 24, 2007
    #15
  16. Elliot

    CBIC Guest

    "TBone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> wrote in message
    news:Xns993A6B68B4B9Creplyhere@207.46.248.16...
    > And on the eigth day "Michael Gossett" <> did
    > cause the electrons to come together and form the following words:
    >
    >> It is, and it varies, I think we CAN say it is between 45 and 70
    >> questions each.

    >
    > Which really doesn't help you to prepare because its a broad range and you
    > still don't know what kind of questions there are. Come to think of it, I
    > didn't even really look at how many question were on my last exam.
    >



    What? and you still passed? Inconceivable!!!ONE1
     
    CBIC, May 24, 2007
    #16
  17. Elliot

    David Guest

    Thanks for the info it helped me a lot to know a little of how the scores are
    arrived at. I've taken a half dozen tests and have found the practice test a
    great way to review the written material and practical experience. That is if
    you take the time to research the answers and review the information. Sort of
    learn what is right and why and what is wrong and why. I don't just simply
    take the test until I know the correct answers from memory (trivia?). In my
    present job I support about 40 people using the XP Professional and 2003
    Office software for the most part. Alot of it I know but we don't use Outlook
    or O Express and I don't get much call to assist in customization issues. So
    I've had to do a lot of reading, practicing and reviewing (testing) to make
    sure I'm up to speed on those areas of the exam. Sorry this is long but I
    felt you were putting me down and I didn't want to contribute to your
    "urinary olympics". What does that mean by the way?
    --
    David DeWitt
    A+, Network+, Security+,70-271


    "John R" wrote:

    >
    > "David" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I'd be interested in knowing the top score. I've been seeing if I'm
    > > prepared
    > > by taking the various practice test (mostly measureup). It would be nice
    > > to
    > > know if I'm scoring high enough to have a good chance at passing the real
    > > exam before I lay out the money.

    >
    > All we really know is that each test is scored differently. How questions
    > are weighted, if they are weighted at all, do you get partial credit, do you
    > get unused time credit, etc, these things are all unknown. When the test is
    > completed, it is scored, and then that score is converted into Microsoft's
    > standard scale. On that scale, 700 or better is pass, less than 700 is
    > fail. That is as good as it gets. Some (upgrade) tests are pass/fail only,
    > and from what I've seen, if you pass, you score 700 on the test no matter
    > what.
    >
    > Although I've never 'sub-optimized' a test, on tests that I thought I really
    > did well on, I've had scores all over the place. On tests that I was a
    > little unsure of, I've had scores all over the place. I have heard rumor of
    > people getting scores over 1000, although I never did, and I have not
    > personally seen a first hand account of such. Even the proctors at the
    > testing center would not divulge the range of scores they have seen.
    >
    > Although, again, it doesn't matter. The last thing we need around here
    > anyway is (if I can borrow a phrase I've seen here before but don't remember
    > who to credit it to) a urinary olympics.
    >
    > And I still fail to see how any of the test trivia questions helps anyone
    > "prepare" for a test. I've never been questioned on a test about what I
    > thought the number of questions was, or what a passing score was, or
    > anything like that. Although, I was asked on every test to verify that my
    > name was correct. (oh no, did I just violate the NDA?)
    >
    > John R
    >
    >
    >
     
    David, May 24, 2007
    #17
  18. Elliot

    catwalker63 Guest

    David piffled away vaguely:

    > Sorry this is long but I
    > felt you were putting me down and I didn't want to contribute to your
    > "urinary olympics". What does that mean by the way?


    If you had been around helping people long enough to see the sheer
    number of times the question is asked about scores, you'd understand
    why we are bored/tired of that question. As for "urinary olympics",
    have you never heard of a p!ssing contest?

    IT Professional Tip: Learn to do a little research.

    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
     
    catwalker63, May 24, 2007
    #18
  19. Elliot

    catwalker63 Guest

    CBIC piffled away vaguely:

    >
    > "TBone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> wrote in message
    > news:Xns993A6B68B4B9Creplyhere@207.46.248.16...
    >> And on the eigth day "Michael Gossett" <> did
    >> cause the electrons to come together and form the following words:
    >>
    >>> It is, and it varies, I think we CAN say it is between 45 and 70
    >>> questions each.

    >>
    >> Which really doesn't help you to prepare because its a broad range and you
    >> still don't know what kind of questions there are. Come to think of it, I
    >> didn't even really look at how many question were on my last exam.
    >>

    >
    >
    > What? and you still passed? Inconceivable!!!ONE1
    >

    You keep saying that word. I don't think it means what you think it
    means.
    --

    Catwalker
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "I have a gun. It's loaded. Shut up."
     
    catwalker63, May 24, 2007
    #19
  20. Elliot

    CBIC Guest

    "catwalker63" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >> What? and you still passed? Inconceivable!!!ONE1
    >>

    > You keep saying that word. I don't think it means what you think it
    > means.


    Sorry. Wrong newsgroup.
     
    CBIC, May 24, 2007
    #20
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