How long have you been online?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by JC, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. JC

    JC Guest

    How long have you been online?

    Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.
    JC, Dec 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. JC

    JC Guest

    JC wrote:
    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    > ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    > is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    > machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Not that I use it, I gave it to my Ma who uses it for email and basic
    word processing.
    JC, Dec 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. "JC" <> wrote in message news:dov9uo$qqt$...
    > JC wrote:
    >> How long have you been online?
    >>


    Myself., I've been on the internet before there where webpages.

    Thanks
    Craig
    Craig Whitmore, Dec 29, 2005
    #3
  4. JC

    JC Guest

    Mr Undeniably Sluttish wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.

    >
    >
    > Hideously expensive - and that's not counting inflation!
    >
    > I've been online for about 6 years now, but using computers for about 20
    > years, starting with the Commodore PET (8k of RAM!).


    My very first comp was an Atari 400, then an 800xl, then a Commodore 64
    and then an Amiga, then the PC 133. The Atari I got in 1983.

    > In '82 I used a computer with a harddrive that was about 1.5 times the
    > size of a shoe box, sat on the desk, took about a minute to become usable
    > after initial powerup, cost, I believe, about $17k (but I can't be sure on
    > that), and could hold, IIRC, about a gig. that computer used CP/M.
    >
    > We had to run a programme to park the heads on the HDD prior to shutting
    > it down.
    >
    > Now I use a computer that has 400 times that amount of storage, and for
    > less than $500.
    >
    >
    > Undeniably Sluttish
    >
    JC, Dec 29, 2005
    #4
  5. On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC wrote:

    > The machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Hideously expensive - and that's not counting inflation!

    I've been online for about 6 years now, but using computers for about 20
    years, starting with the Commodore PET (8k of RAM!).

    In '82 I used a computer with a harddrive that was about 1.5 times the
    size of a shoe box, sat on the desk, took about a minute to become usable
    after initial powerup, cost, I believe, about $17k (but I can't be sure on
    that), and could hold, IIRC, about a gig. that computer used CP/M.

    We had to run a programme to park the heads on the HDD prior to shutting
    it down.

    Now I use a computer that has 400 times that amount of storage, and for
    less than $500.


    Undeniably Sluttish

    --
    Free software on every PC on every desk.
    Mr Undeniably Sluttish, Dec 29, 2005
    #5
  6. On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:18:15 +1300, JC wrote:

    >> Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    >> ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    >> is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    >> machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.

    >
    > Not that I use it, I gave it to my Ma who uses it for email and basic
    > word processing.


    I'm just about to retire my p120. It's been serving out its senior years
    as a network firewall - which it's done admirably.

    But times change, and I've now got other faster machines that have
    approached senior status and now need something to do in their dotage. :eek:)

    Would anybody here have a use for what will shortly be a redundant P120
    mobo, CPU, and case?

    Undeniably Sluttish

    --
    Free software on every PC on every desk.
    --
    "I'd hate to be furniture in Ballmer's office."
    --
    Pamela Jones: "Linux will continue to grow, and open formats and standards
    will continue to be adopted in part because we don't trust Microsoft."
    --
    Free Open Source software - it's not just about better code, as important as
    that is. It's about better values, higher ethics.
    --
    "Open Source. It's the difference between trust and antitrust."
    --
    Joe Barr: "So the question is not 'Is Microsoft lying?' It's deeper than
    that. The real question is, 'Is Microsoft capable of honesty?' And if you
    decide - as I have - that they are not, the next question becomes, 'Do I
    really want to do business with, to trust my business to, a company like that?'"
    --
    Windows is a bonfire, Linux is the sun. Linux only looks smaller if you lack
    perspective.
    --
    Fink: "The Linux market is growing 30% to 35% a year."
    --
    Groklaw: "Seriously, the problem Microsoft has with its FUD is this: it waited
    too long. Too many solid, upstanding, capitalist corporations now believe in
    and depend on open source. They are making money, and they aren't going to
    allow the anti-FOSS FUD to stand unchallenged."
    --
    "Linux and MySQL are going to keep chipping away at Micro$ofts' install base
    and it is terrified. Why else would they keep spouting on about how awful
    Linux is? If it was no threat they would just ignore and move on. I think the
    same goes for a huge number of windows admins, they see a steep learning curve
    for a whole new skill set on the horizon and are struggling to avoid it. Linux
    and open source are the future, get used to it."
    --
    "Microsoft don't need any moral right to be a hypocrite. It's an oxymoron.
    They will do what they can get away with. Of course this makes it difficult
    for their advocates to occupy any high moral ground."
    --
    Tony Simpson: "It is the historical role of the young to irritate the
    old by being so innocent & naive. And, is the historical role of the
    old to irritate the young by pointing it out."
    --
    The Queen's Mother: "Well I don't know what all you queens are doing,
    but this old Queen wants a drink."
    --
    "A life? Sounds great! Do you know where I could download one?"
    --
    43 - for those who require slightly more than the answer to life, the
    universe and everything.
    --
    "Been there, done that. Read tons of history, philosophy, the bible, and
    lots of analysis of those. Spent lots of time in prayer. Conclusions: 1.
    prayer is meditation, no more no less - it's good for you (just like TM)
    so go ahead and do it. 2. God is Santa Claus for adults."
    --
    "President Bush is NOT the only stupid person in America, There are
    plenty to choose from"
    --
    The above reply is in response to a person who can be only described as a
    knuckle-dragger.
    --
    "Gay, lesbian and bisexual people are often portrayed as a threat to all
    that is good and decent. When we seek the SAME rights as others, these
    people denounce us as seeking special rights."
    Mr Undeniably Sluttish, Dec 29, 2005
    #6
  7. On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:38:15 +1300, Craig Whitmore wrote:

    >>> How long have you been online?
    >>>

    >
    > Myself., I've been on the internet before there where webpages.


    I have a mate who's been using email since the '70s.


    Undeniably Sluttish

    --
    Free software on every PC on every desk.
    Mr Undeniably Sluttish, Dec 29, 2005
    #7
  8. JC

    Shane Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC wrote:

    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of ram
    > and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer is
    > still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The machine
    > cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Relative newbie to the intarweb here, First computer I came into contact
    with was the neighbours Sinclair zx81, First computer I owned was an Acorn
    something, First computer I programmed was Apple IIe, first computer I
    connected to the intarweb was an IBM something that my flatmate.... umm..
    found ... and that was about 5 years ago, and my favourite game was
    Transport Tycoon.
    :)


    --
    Q: Why did the programmer call his mother long distance?
    A: Because that was her name.
    Shane, Dec 29, 2005
    #8
  9. In <> Mr Undeniably
    Sluttish wrote:
    >
    > In '82 I used a computer with a harddrive that was about 1.5 times the
    > size of a shoe box, sat on the desk, took about a minute to become
    > usable after initial powerup, cost, I believe, about $17k (but I can't
    > be sure on that), and could hold, IIRC, about a gig. that computer
    > used CP/M.


    $17000 in 1982 might have bought a 10 megabyte hard drive. Of course CP/
    M probably only took up at most a couple of hundred kilobytes, so it
    probably felt a lot bigger :eek:) The first hard drives that could store a
    gigabyte weren't available until the mid 1980s, and even then they were
    huge drives with 14-inch disks.

    My first hard drive was a 20MB MiniScribe SCSI in an external case. From
    memory the (second hand!) drive cost $600 and the SCSI card for the
    Apple IIe computer was $400. I never managed to fill it up until I
    upgraded to an Apple IIGS. The drive died some years ago, and was
    replaced with a Quantum 40MB. Now the same enclosure has a 1GB drive in
    it and is connected to an old Mac Plus. That 1GB drive cost me about $20
    on Trade Me!

    --
    Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
    http://roger.geek.nz/
    ________________________________________________________________________
    No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

    Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
    Roger Johnstone, Dec 29, 2005
    #9
  10. JC

    Philip Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC wrote:
    >
    >> How long have you been online?
    >>
    >> Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of ram
    >> and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer is
    >> still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The machine
    >> cost me $2999 all up. Youch.

    >
    > Relative newbie to the intarweb here, First computer I came into contact
    > with was the neighbours Sinclair zx81, First computer I owned was an Acorn
    > something, First computer I programmed was Apple IIe, first computer I
    > connected to the intarweb was an IBM something that my flatmate.... umm..
    > found ... and that was about 5 years ago, and my favourite game was
    > Transport Tycoon.
    > :)


    First visit on-line in 1982, with an Anderson-Jacobsen Acoustic Coupler
    at 300 Baud - you dialled the number on a regular phone, listened until
    the wheeping & screeping started & then thrust the phone receiver into
    these two faintly vulgar looking rubber cups on top.

    Internet wasn't really on offer unless you were a heavy academic, which
    I wasn't, & a high-definition screen was 25 lines of 80 characters each.
    Computers: a NewBrain running CP/M, and later an Amstrad PC 1512, with
    an 8086 prcessor and a dizzying 512K of RAM. You could get online in
    Manchester UK with Microlink or EasyLink, and access unsorted pages of
    stuff - but an awful lot of it was lists of things you didn't have
    access to, like titles of articles without being able to get to the
    article itself. And there were the BBS - people put computers online for
    fun, offering files, games, chat, newsgroups and a kind of e-mail.

    Then Prestel, Shades MUD, Essex MUD and my own Fido BBS from 1983.

    I suppose I first noticed the Web in any real form in about 1992 or 3,
    as I started to understand what hyperlinks were. Browser of choice at
    that time was Lynx, and Netscape was somewhere around Revision 1 or 2,
    and my e-mail address was @ucon.gun.de, operated by the German Unix user
    network. Penguins back then were what lived on the ice...

    I recall when the cutting-edge search engines of choice were Hotbot and
    Lycos, competing with the fledgling newcomer Yahoo.

    It all seems to have come along a bit since then.

    Philip
    Philip, Dec 29, 2005
    #10
  11. JC

    GraB Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC <> wrote:

    >How long have you been online?
    >
    >Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    >ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    >is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    >machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Been online since April '98, with a 33.6k modem. Didn't think I
    needed it. First PC, bought 2nd hand in '95, was a 386DX40 with 4megs
    RAM, 170meg Conner hard drive, 256Kb ISA video card. I added a 2x
    CD-ROM and SoundBlaster16 soundcard. Eventually upgraded it to
    486DX-2/ 80MHz, 16megs RAM 540Mb Fireball hard drive, 4Mb S3 Virge.
    GraB, Dec 29, 2005
    #11
  12. JC

    steve Guest

    JC wrote:
    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    > ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    > is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    > machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    October / November 1990.

    IBM PC XT - twin 360k floppies and 10MB HD - Amber monochrome monitor.

    2400bps external modem to a shell account on Actrix...which used to be
    $168 / annum (flat rate). Almost no one at that time had DIRECT internet
    access the way we do now. You had to ftp a file to Actrix, then Zmodem
    download it your PC at a (then) really fast 13KB / minute.

    Actrix connection to the outside world was a HUGE 19.2kbps.....and it
    was at that time the only ISP in NZ that would take anyone (Auckland's
    kcbbs was restricted by capacity and you had to know someone to be able
    to join).
    steve, Dec 29, 2005
    #12
  13. JC

    EMB Guest

    Craig Whitmore wrote:

    > Myself., I've been on the internet before there where webpages.


    Same here.


    --
    EMB
    EMB, Dec 29, 2005
    #13
  14. JC

    steve Guest

    steve wrote:
    > JC wrote:
    >
    >> How long have you been online?
    >>
    >> Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    >> ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That
    >> computer is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when
    >> new. The machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.

    >
    >
    > October / November 1990.
    >
    > IBM PC XT - twin 360k floppies and 10MB HD - Amber monochrome monitor.
    >
    > 2400bps external modem to a shell account on Actrix...which used to be
    > $168 / annum (flat rate). Almost no one at that time had DIRECT internet
    > access the way we do now. You had to ftp a file to Actrix, then Zmodem
    > download it your PC at a (then) really fast 13KB / minute.
    >
    > Actrix connection to the outside world was a HUGE 19.2kbps.....and it
    > was at that time the only ISP in NZ that would take anyone (Auckland's
    > kcbbs was restricted by capacity and you had to know someone to be able
    > to join).
    >


    ....and if "online" includes BBS activity....than I'd have to go back to
    1986-7.

    The Cave was a popular 'place'....and the FIDOnet BBS network carried
    early Internet e-mail and newsgroup traffic for those who couldn't get
    to Actrix or some other Internet access point.

    Few businesses had Internet. It was people using it at home that dragged
    it into work.....much like DOS and then Windows in that regard.
    steve, Dec 29, 2005
    #14
  15. JC

    Dave Green Guest

    JC wrote:
    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    > ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    > is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    > machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Vaxnotes on Easynet - mid 80's I think.

    Dave
    Dave Green, Dec 29, 2005
    #15
  16. On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC <> wrote in
    <news:dov9ps$qqt$>:

    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    > ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    > is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    > machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Probably fifteen years or more in total - I'll lay claim to nine years,
    going on ten, on the Internet - my first archived posting to Usenet was on
    5APR1996, and I had been BBSing or on FidoNet (or both) for about 10 years
    prior to that. They were "interesting" times indeed, indeed.

    --
    Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Dec 29, 2005
    #16
  17. JC

    Brendan Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC wrote:

    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    > ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    > is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    > machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    1990 or there abouts, with an atari ST and later an amiga. BBS's, some of
    which has usenet access.

    The internet around 1992 or 95 IIRC, on an amiga - I was the only one
    around the area who could configure the TCP/IP stack and SLIP to work on an
    amiga. First ISP was Efficient Software of Dunedin, who were bought up by
    IHUG a couple of years later. Think I was using a PC from about 95 onwards.

    10, 12 years depending on your definition. Hard to believe it's been that
    long.

    When I started, if you had a computer at all it was likely a commodore 64,
    or an amiga if you were rich. Now most everyone has a computer. I have seen
    the net go from a domain of technicians, engineers, experts and scientists
    to a vast rabble of mouthy half-wits.
    That's probably a bit harsh but there is definitely a lot of crap online
    now. It used to be about swapping information, co-operation and knowledge.
    Now it's about money and control, it's being subverted into a money machine
    by those who already have FAR too much.

    --

    .... Brendan

    #2999 +(3714)- [X]

    <kyourek> There was a 23% drop in temperature.
    <nappyjallapy> That's almost 25%!
    <kyourek> ... That was one of the most worthless comments I've ever heard.


    Note: All my comments are copyright 29/12/2005 4:12:57 p.m. and are opinion only where not otherwise stated and always "to the best of my recollection". www.computerman.orcon.net.nz.
    Brendan, Dec 29, 2005
    #17
  18. JC

    XPD Guest

    "JC" <> wrote in message news:dov9ps$qqt$...
    > How long have you been online?
    >
    > Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of ram
    > and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer is
    > still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The machine
    > cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    Cant remember what year it was exactly but I was on my Amiga500 running
    Miami TCP stack and Ibrowse...even purchased a legit copy for some reason
    :p
    Think I only had 6mb of RAM then with a 120mb HDD
    To be honest, Id still be on it today if it wasnt for the HDD controller
    packing it in.

    But I remember my 1st ISP.... (and a certain someone here will remember them
    very well ;) ) - Sinesurf.co.nz - $35 flat rate - they were an IAP NOT an
    ISP...not that they couldve helped me anyway being on my miggy :)
    Interesting bunch of staff there..... ;)
    XPD, Dec 29, 2005
    #18
  19. JC

    ~misfit~ Guest

    GraB wrote:
    > On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC <> wrote:
    >
    >> How long have you been online?
    >>
    >> Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    >> ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That
    >> computer is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when
    >> new. The machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.

    >
    > Been online since April '98, with a 33.6k modem. Didn't think I
    > needed it. First PC, bought 2nd hand in '95, was a 386DX40 with 4megs
    > RAM, 170meg Conner hard drive, 256Kb ISA video card. I added a 2x
    > CD-ROM and SoundBlaster16 soundcard. Eventually upgraded it to
    > 486DX-2/ 80MHz, 16megs RAM 540Mb Fireball hard drive, 4Mb S3 Virge.


    I've been online about 8-9 years, bought my first PC (and modem) the year
    before but, living in the country, internet access was too expensive.

    My first PC, which replaced an Amiga 500 I'd had for a little while, was a
    Total Peripherals 'Multimedia' 486DX2/66, 420MB HDD, 2x CD-ROM, Creative
    Vibra 16 sound card, 256Kb ISA video, 14" monitor. 4MB RAM (Upgraded it to
    8MB not long after at a cost of about $250), a Windows-only laser printer
    (Winstar?) external powered speakers (quite good actually, I was sad when I
    parted with them, they weighed 5x what modern cheapies weigh and sounded
    reasonable too) and an external Dynalink 14.4 modem. Running DOS 6.22 and
    Win (for workgroups) 3.11. Total cost around $5.5K.

    I still have the sound card and the OS disks, although they aren't readable
    anymore. Also still have my Windows 95 upgrade CD that I bought the day it
    was released. Ugh! Win95a.

    That case ended it's life (as far as I was concerned, it got passed on) as a
    Pentium 166MMX with 64MB RAM, an 8x CD-ROM, 2MB PCI graphics and a 1.7GB
    Maxtor HDD. The only things that were original were the case, PSU and
    floppy. I went on to the wonderful world of Slot 1 SECC cartridges (and
    slockets), (Klamath, Deschutes, Katmai, Coppermine, Tualatin... Those were
    the days) then Socket A, AMD after that. Still on Socket A and Slockets and
    will probably stay that way for a while.

    Current machines are: Athlon Barton 2600+, T'bred 2200+, Tualatin Celeron
    1.4Ghz. 1.3GHz, and Coppermine Celeron 900MHz. Actually the 900 is a Socket
    370, the only one I've owned that wasn't built into a slocket. I have a
    spare Tualatin 1.2GHz on the shelf. I think these machines are going to have
    to last me a while.

    LOL, I still have two Coppermine Celeron 600's, cC0 and cB0, stepping, in
    slockets, in my drawer, that would both run happilly at 900MHz on a 100MHz
    FSB with a little over-volting. I can't bring myself to sell them for the
    (probably) $5 each that I'd get for them when they were such great CPUs for
    a few years.

    Ahhh, the new year approaching, time for reminiscences.
    --
    ~misfit~
    ~misfit~, Dec 29, 2005
    #19
  20. JC

    Squirrel Guest

    On Thu, 29 Dec 2005 13:15:38 +1300, JC <> wrote:

    >How long have you been online?
    >
    >Myself it has been 9 years now, started off with an IBM P133, 16mb of
    >ram and 1-2mb of shared video ram and a 1.2gb hard drive. That computer
    >is still going strong and the monitor is like it was when new. The
    >machine cost me $2999 all up. Youch.


    abut 13 years if you count BBS life then Net
    Squirrel, Dec 29, 2005
    #20
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