How long does it take a JPG to deteriorate?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David_nj_7@mailbolt.com, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    as they did at the time that I sent them out.

    Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    little bit "washed out".

    I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    decline.

    Thanks

    DAVID
     
    , Mar 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. Pete D Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > decline.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > DAVID


    ROLF
     
    Pete D, Mar 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. Colin D Guest

    Pete D wrote:
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    > >
    > > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > > little bit "washed out".
    > >
    > > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > > decline.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > DAVID

    >
    > ROLF


    I think you mean rofl, not rolf?

    Colin D.
     
    Colin D, Mar 12, 2006
    #3
  4. Chucknitro Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > decline.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > DAVID
    >


    All bits seem to lose their byte in time. Thats why its called a lossy
    format. ;)
     
    Chucknitro, Mar 12, 2006
    #4
  5. wrote:
    : I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    : that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    : as they did at the time that I sent them out.

    : Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    : most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    : little bit "washed out".

    : I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    : long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    : decline.

    I an a bit confused. Are you looking at prints of these Jpegs or viewing
    them on your computer screen? If it is a print I can understand fading as
    the inks used in many printers do tend to fade over time (faster if in the
    sun). If you are looking at the images on your monitor there should be no
    change between viewings. As long as the data is not rewritten it shouldn't
    change. Each time you open the image you are only reading the data in for
    display, not changing the data. That is one of the big advantages of
    digital data storage, baring any physical damage of the storage media
    there should be no change from one use to another. And when damage occures
    it makes that bit or the entire image unreadable. But no fading.

    The only way I can think of that a digital image would fade when displayed
    on the screen would be if the screen itself changed in its parameters.
    Either the screen settings changed (such as an attempt to color correct
    the screen or changes to brightness/contrast controls) or the phosphor and
    guns are wearing out on a CRT. Otherwise the simple display of a stored
    image should be exactly the same over time.

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Mar 12, 2006
    #5
  6. Paul Heslop Guest

    Colin D wrote:
    >
    > Pete D wrote:
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > > > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > > > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    > > >
    > > > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > > > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > > > little bit "washed out".
    > > >
    > > > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > > > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > > > decline.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > >
    > > > DAVID

    > >
    > > ROLF

    >
    > I think you mean rofl, not rolf?
    >
    > Colin D.


    No, he was being sick and couldn't write the rest.

    --
    Paul (This is really happening, happening)
    -------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
     
    Paul Heslop, Mar 12, 2006
    #6
  7. Helen Guest

    "Colin D" <ColinD@killspam.127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:4413ED95.6B48FED7@killspam.127.0.0.1...
    >
    >>
    >> ROLF

    >
    > I think you mean rofl, not rolf?
    >
    > Colin D.


    Or perhaps he meant "ask Rolf Haris, the well known Australian artist who
    resides in the UK"?
     
    Helen, Mar 12, 2006
    #7
  8. Mark Guest

    "Randy Berbaum" <> wrote in message
    news:dv0rru$vbm$...
    > wrote:
    > : I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > : that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > : as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > : Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > : most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > : little bit "washed out".
    >
    > : I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > : long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > : decline.
    >
    > I an a bit confused. Are you looking at prints of these Jpegs or viewing
    > them on your computer screen? If it is a print I can understand fading as
    > the inks used in many printers do tend to fade over time (faster if in the
    > sun). If you are looking at the images on your monitor there should be no
    > change between viewings. As long as the data is not rewritten it shouldn't
    > change. Each time you open the image you are only reading the data in for
    > display, not changing the data. That is one of the big advantages of
    > digital data storage, baring any physical damage of the storage media
    > there should be no change from one use to another. And when damage occures
    > it makes that bit or the entire image unreadable. But no fading.
    >
    > The only way I can think of that a digital image would fade when displayed
    > on the screen would be if the screen itself changed in its parameters.
    > Either the screen settings changed (such as an attempt to color correct
    > the screen or changes to brightness/contrast controls) or the phosphor and
    > guns are wearing out on a CRT. Otherwise the simple display of a stored
    > image should be exactly the same over time.
    >
    > Randy
    >


    Do you mind if he pulls your OTHER leg?
     
    Mark, Mar 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Joan Guest

    You missed some other possibilities:

    Failing eyesight
    Today's photos are much better and make last year's photos look bad
    Change of monitor - either different or deteriorated
    Troll feeding time


    --
    Joan
    http://joan.colley.name:85
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    "Randy Berbaum" <> wrote in message
    news:dv0rru$vbm$...
    : wrote:
    :
    : The only way I can think of that a digital image would fade when
    displayed
    : on the screen would be if the screen itself changed in its
    parameters.
    : Either the screen settings changed (such as an attempt to color
    correct
    : the screen or changes to brightness/contrast controls) or the
    phosphor and
    : guns are wearing out on a CRT. Otherwise the simple display of a
    stored
    : image should be exactly the same over time.
    :
    : Randy
    :
    : ==========
    : Randy Berbaum
    : Champaign, IL
    :
     
    Joan, Mar 12, 2006
    #9
  10. Dimitris M Guest

    Yes, jpg's loose their detail and colors with time. The factors for that is
    the age your monitor and the age of your eyes ;-). The first can be faced.
    The second....
    --
    Dimitris M



    > I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > decline.
     
    Dimitris M, Mar 12, 2006
    #10
  11. Adam Grinter Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast?



    Yes.

    I have developed a utility that can fix it, though. Only $49.95 for 1000
    photos or $89.95 for an unlimited lifetime licence. Email me for details of
    how to purchase.
     
    Adam Grinter, Mar 12, 2006
    #11
  12. wrote:
    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as
    > sharp as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know
    > how long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to
    > their decline.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > DAVID


    You need to store those e-mails in a light proof container.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Mar 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Stewy Guest

    In article <4413ED95.6B48FED7@killspam.127.0.0.1>,
    Colin D <ColinD@killspam.127.0.0.1> wrote:

    > Pete D wrote:
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > > > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > > > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    > > >
    > > > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > > > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > > > little bit "washed out".
    > > >
    > > > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > > > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > > > decline.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > >
    > > > DAVID

    > >
    > > ROLF

    >
    > I think you mean rofl, not rolf?
    >

    He knows what he means, doncha Rolf?

    It depends on how many times the jpeg was opened, changed and re-saved -
    each time a little bit is lost, the same with mp3s.

    Storing originals as jpegs (if they were taken as such) is the best
    option. Always make changes and store as a TIFF or PSD.
     
    Stewy, Mar 12, 2006
    #13
  14. "Chucknitro" <> writes:

    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    >> that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    >> as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >>
    >> Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    >> most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    >> little bit "washed out".
    >>
    >> I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    >> long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    >> decline.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> DAVID
    >>

    >
    > All bits seem to lose their byte in time. Thats why its called a lossy
    > format. ;)


    I didn't know bitrot affected pictures. It's well known that source
    code rots.

    --
    Måns Rullgård
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?M=E5ns_Rullg=E5rd?=, Mar 12, 2006
    #14
  15. Mxsmanic Guest

    writes:

    > I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.


    It's your imagination. JPEGs never deterioate. Nothing digital
    deteriorates.

    --
    Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
     
    Mxsmanic, Mar 12, 2006
    #15
  16. On 12 Mar 2006 01:30:39 -0800, wrote:

    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    >that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    >as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    >Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    >most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    >little bit "washed out".
    >
    >I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    >long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    >decline.


    By the time we get to April 1st you may be right. But now you are out
    a little early.

    Peter
     
    Peter Rongsted, Mar 12, 2006
    #16
  17. ben brugman Guest


    >
    > It's your imagination. JPEGs never deterioate. Nothing digital
    > deteriorates.


    My JPEG's do detoriate, sometimes you do not notice, and
    sometimes the complete lower part of a JPEG is gray.
    Sometimes from a certain point onward the color changes.

    I have had this a few times, I did not expect this, I would
    expect read errors before any detoriation of a JPEG would
    happen.
    But in a few cases the detoriation happend without read errors
    beforehand.

    Detoriation of the JPEG's can be an indication that this will
    be followed by a complete media failure, or failure of a large
    part of you media.

    Some experimenting showed me that you can alter some bits
    in a JPEG file, sometimes the change is hardly visible sometimes
    from that point onward you get a change in the picture. (This is
    often visible in the color of the remaining part of the picture).

    ben




    >
    > --
    > Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
     
    ben brugman, Mar 12, 2006
    #17
  18. [BnH] Guest

    I still have some images from my Kodak DC265 .. looks fine here.
    Try checking your devices [and that includes your eyesights]

    =bob=


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > decline.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > DAVID
    >
     
    [BnH], Mar 12, 2006
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    <> wrote:

    > I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >
    > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    > little bit "washed out".
    >
    > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    > decline.


    Sounds like a clear case of Bad Bit Syndrome.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Mar 12, 2006
    #19
  20. Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 20:56:15 +0900, Stewy <>
    wrote:

    >In article <4413ED95.6B48FED7@killspam.127.0.0.1>,
    > Colin D <ColinD@killspam.127.0.0.1> wrote:
    >
    >> Pete D wrote:
    >> >
    >> > <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> > >I was looking through some old emails I sent about 7 or 8 months ago
    >> > > that included some JPG photos and the pictures just don't look as sharp
    >> > > as they did at the time that I sent them out.
    >> > >
    >> > > Can a photo go downhill that fast? I mean, they still look OK for the
    >> > > most part but not as sharp as back then and some of the colors look a
    >> > > little bit "washed out".
    >> > >
    >> > > I knew that JPGs could lose some of their luster I just didn't know how
    >> > > long it took and what some of the factors were that contribute to their
    >> > > decline.
    >> > >
    >> > > Thanks
    >> > >
    >> > > DAVID
    >> >
    >> > ROLF

    >>
    >> I think you mean rofl, not rolf?
    >>

    >He knows what he means, doncha Rolf?
    >
    >It depends on how many times the jpeg was opened, changed and re-saved -
    >each time a little bit is lost, the same with mp3s.
    >
    >Storing originals as jpegs (if they were taken as such) is the best
    >option. Always make changes and store as a TIFF or PSD.


    That "wooshing" sound you heard was the whole point of the OP going
    over your head.
    :)

    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Mar 12, 2006
    #20
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