How long do cameras last?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Chris, Aug 16, 2004.

  1. Chris

    Chris Guest

    How long do cameras last?

    I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    seem as sharp as it used to.

    Do cameras go off?
    Should they be serviced?
    Or replaced?

    I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.
    --
    Chris
    Chris, Aug 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. Chris

    Jim Guest

    "Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    > How long do cameras last?
    >
    > I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    > seem as sharp as it used to.

    Rather subjective..
    >
    > Do cameras go off?

    Yes
    > Should they be serviced?
    > Or replaced?

    They should be serviced if it costs less than buying a new one.
    >
    > I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.

    Only an inexpensive camera would be worn out with that few. However, since
    I have no idea what the replacement cost would be, nor do I have an idea
    what the repair cost would be, I make a decision.
    Jim
    Jim, Aug 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. Chris

    Alan Meyer Guest

    "Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    > How long do cameras last?
    >
    > I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    > seem as sharp as it used to.
    >
    > Do cameras go off?
    > Should they be serviced?
    > Or replaced?
    >
    > I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.


    What an interesting question! Not knowing the
    real answer, I can proceed to theoretical speculation.
    And as we all know, in theory, theory and practice
    are identical :)

    In theory, electronics do exhibit wear. For example
    the gain on a transistor will vary with time and usage.
    Good designers design for this by keeping their
    requirements well within the specs even for aged
    components, and by designing in feedback circuits
    that compensate for component aging.

    Another possible problem might be mechanical wear.
    After many bumps, it is possible that the lens
    is no longer perfectly aligned with the sensor plane,
    or some lens elements have been jostled out of
    alignment.

    Still another possibility is that dust or condensation have
    appeared inside the camera on a lens element or on the
    sensor, interfering with sharpness.

    I'm sure you have already checked the most obvious
    cause - dirt or fingerprints on the lens.

    Alan
    Alan Meyer, Aug 16, 2004
    #3
  4. Chris

    Ken Scharf Guest

    Alan Meyer wrote:
    > "Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    > news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    >
    >>How long do cameras last?
    >>
    >>I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    >>seem as sharp as it used to.
    >>
    >>Do cameras go off?
    >>Should they be serviced?
    >>Or replaced?
    >>
    >>I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.

    >
    >
    > What an interesting question! Not knowing the
    > real answer, I can proceed to theoretical speculation.
    > And as we all know, in theory, theory and practice
    > are identical :)
    >
    > In theory, electronics do exhibit wear. For example
    > the gain on a transistor will vary with time and usage.
    > Good designers design for this by keeping their
    > requirements well within the specs even for aged
    > components, and by designing in feedback circuits
    > that compensate for component aging.
    >
    > Another possible problem might be mechanical wear.
    > After many bumps, it is possible that the lens
    > is no longer perfectly aligned with the sensor plane,
    > or some lens elements have been jostled out of
    > alignment.
    >
    > Still another possibility is that dust or condensation have
    > appeared inside the camera on a lens element or on the
    > sensor, interfering with sharpness.
    >
    > I'm sure you have already checked the most obvious
    > cause - dirt or fingerprints on the lens.
    >
    > Alan
    >
    >

    Also he might try a new memory card. Flash memory has
    a limit on the number of write cycles, and some forms of
    flash will start taking longer to write as they get near
    (or beyond) their rated number of write cycles. This
    could have an effect on the quality of the images stored
    if memory errors are taking place.
    Ken Scharf, Aug 16, 2004
    #4
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    In article <qAaUc.986$>, Alan Meyer
    <> writes
    >"Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    >news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    >> How long do cameras last?
    >> I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    >> seem as sharp as it used to.
    >> Do cameras go off?
    >> Should they be serviced?
    >> Or replaced?
    >> I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.


    >What an interesting question! Not knowing the
    >real answer, I can proceed to theoretical speculation.
    >And as we all know, in theory, theory and practice
    >are identical :)
    >In theory, electronics do exhibit wear. For example
    >the gain on a transistor will vary with time and usage.
    >Good designers design for this by keeping their
    >requirements well within the specs even for aged
    >components, and by designing in feedback circuits
    >that compensate for component aging.
    >Another possible problem might be mechanical wear.
    >After many bumps, it is possible that the lens
    >is no longer perfectly aligned with the sensor plane,
    >or some lens elements have been jostled out of
    >alignment.
    >Still another possibility is that dust or condensation have
    >appeared inside the camera on a lens element or on the
    >sensor, interfering with sharpness.
    >I'm sure you have already checked the most obvious
    >cause - dirt or fingerprints on the lens.


    Thanks Alan. I've checked the obvious things.
    Are there any simple tests I can do to check out the camera?
    Test charts? Anything straightforward to tell me whether to keep or
    replace? I wish I'd done some standard test when it was new!
    --
    Chris
    Chris, Aug 17, 2004
    #5
  6. Chris

    Anoni Moose Guest

    Chris <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message news:<Z1ptAxDKtZIBFwPp@[127.0.0.1]>...
    > In article <qAaUc.986$>, Alan Meyer
    > <> writes
    > >"Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    > >news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    > >> How long do cameras last?
    > >> I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    > >> seem as sharp as it used to.
    > >> Do cameras go off?
    > >> Should they be serviced?
    > >> Or replaced?
    > >> I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.

    >
    > >What an interesting question! Not knowing the
    > >real answer, I can proceed to theoretical speculation.
    > >And as we all know, in theory, theory and practice
    > >are identical :)
    > >In theory, electronics do exhibit wear. For example
    > >the gain on a transistor will vary with time and usage.
    > >Good designers design for this by keeping their
    > >requirements well within the specs even for aged
    > >components, and by designing in feedback circuits
    > >that compensate for component aging.
    > >Another possible problem might be mechanical wear.
    > >After many bumps, it is possible that the lens
    > >is no longer perfectly aligned with the sensor plane,
    > >or some lens elements have been jostled out of
    > >alignment.
    > >Still another possibility is that dust or condensation have
    > >appeared inside the camera on a lens element or on the
    > >sensor, interfering with sharpness.
    > >I'm sure you have already checked the most obvious
    > >cause - dirt or fingerprints on the lens.

    >
    > Thanks Alan. I've checked the obvious things.
    > Are there any simple tests I can do to check out the camera?
    > Test charts? Anything straightforward to tell me whether to keep or
    > replace? I wish I'd done some standard test when it was new!



    Another source of a camera getting less sharp as time goes on is
    that the glamour of a new camera wears off and one becomes more
    critical of results later on. I say this only partially tongue
    in cheek, I think there's some truth in it.

    Is the lack of sharpness just a feeling for new pictures, or
    do you look (now) at the first pictures taken and still think they
    were sharper when looking side-by-side?

    Mike

    P.S. - At least with digital cameras, they only a last a short
    time until they're "obsolete" several times over at which
    time they need to be replaced because it doesn't look so good
    anymore (different variation of the same thing). We're on
    our third generation of digital camera.... :)
    Anoni Moose, Aug 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Chris

    Bob Fusillo Guest

    The answer to the question is that nobody really knows. I have made the
    enquiry of various "experts" and they don't know-- can't even guess.
    Obsolescence is one thing, but physical deterioration is the problem. They
    are not mechanical, and nobody really knows how long the circuits, the
    insides in all their complexity, will stay workable. I have a forty five
    year old Canon 35ml that works as good as new. I made a living for some
    years with two forty year old Rolleis. -- I have a feeling that none of the
    digitals will be working in forty five years. Perhaps not even twenty. My
    three year old Olympus digital is already creating problems and destroying
    cards ----
    My Canon cost me almost two week's pay. The Rolleis a bit more. My Olympus
    cost the same. Hmmmm!
    rjf

    "Chris" <nospam@[127.0.0.1]> wrote in message
    news:Mb24VQKehOIBFw$w@[127.0.0.1]...
    > How long do cameras last?
    >
    > I have an Ixus, which I bought when they first came out, and it doesn't
    > seem as sharp as it used to.
    >
    > Do cameras go off?
    > Should they be serviced?
    > Or replaced?
    >
    > I've taken about 9,500 pix with it.
    > --
    > Chris
    Bob Fusillo, Aug 18, 2004
    #7
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