How is a harddisk attached to the computer?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Richard Fangnail, May 9, 2006.

  1. In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?
    Richard Fangnail, May 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. Richard Fangnail

    Cub Guest

    "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?
    >

    Nano bots carry the data to and from the disk.


    FGS
    Cub, May 9, 2006
    #2
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  3. Richard Fangnail

    Mike Easter Guest

    Richard Fangnail wrote:
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?


    Directly to the mobo as an I/O interface, the interface depending upon
    the generation of hdd/mobo; IDE/ATA - UDMA, SATA I or II, or a person
    can add hdd interfaces if the mobo is limited

    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?


    You should peek inside your tower case and see what a mobo and its
    connections look like.

    Here's a pic of an 80 conductor udma cable and its connector
    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/z_000553idecable80.jpg

    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, May 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Richard Fangnail

    Jerry Attic Guest

    "Richard Fangnail" <> said in
    news::

    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?
    >


    Definitely more wires. If you don't believe me, open the case and actually
    *look*,

    Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
    Jerry Attic, May 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Richard Fangnail

    soup Guest

    Richard Fangnail wrote:
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?


    Definately more wires .
    My computer, hard disc is just behind yellow triangle it has the sticker
    with writing on attached to it.
    http://www.sidtech.co.uk/iu/soup771500346120.JPG

    --
    This space intentionally left blank.
    soup, May 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Richard Fangnail

    soup Guest

    soup wrote:
    > My computer, hard disc is just behind yellow triangle


    That is a yellow sticker with a black triangle on it.
    ..--
    This space intentionally left blank.
    soup, May 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Richard Fangnail

    Melvin Snerd Guest

    "soup" <> said in news:k948g.66806$wl.21550
    @text.news.blueyonder.co.uk:

    > Richard Fangnail wrote:
    >> In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    >> Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?

    >
    > Definately more wires .
    > My computer, hard disc is just behind yellow triangle it has the sticker
    > with writing on attached to it.
    > http://www.sidtech.co.uk/iu/soup771500346120.JPG
    >


    Did you get your PC out of a box of cereal?

    Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
    Melvin Snerd, May 9, 2006
    #7
  8. Richard Fangnail

    Flyer Guest

    "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?
    >


    usually, by two cables, one for power, one for data. Physically, it usually
    sits in a cage that's normally part of the case.

    P.
    Flyer, May 9, 2006
    #8
  9. Richard Fangnail

    Moke G Guest

    "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?



    With glue and sticky-back plastic !


    Moke G.
    Moke G, May 9, 2006
    #9
  10. Richard Fangnail

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-09, Richard Fangnail <> wrote:
    > In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    > Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?


    Many wires, usually the data wires are bundled into a single ribbon or
    round cable, and the power leads are in another bundle. Depending on the
    design of the case, the shell of the disc drive will attach to the chassis
    using screws, nuts and bolts, spring clips, or friction, in a 'cradle' or
    on 'rails' built into or attached to the chassis. (Unless it was built by a
    real enthusiast, in which case sticky-tape or superglue or chewing-gum
    could be involved).

    There are 'removable hard disc' arrangements that allow the disc to be slid
    in and out like a PC Card - but bigger of course.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 9, 2006
    #10
  11. Richard Fangnail

    Noel Paton Guest

    "Moke G" < .net> wrote in message
    news:sg58g.12585$...
    >
    > "Richard Fangnail" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    >> Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?

    >
    >
    > With glue and sticky-back plastic !
    >
    >


    When did you get your Blue Peter Badge?
    :)

    --
    Noel Paton (MS-MVP 2002-2006, Windows)

    Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    http://www.crashfixpc.com/millsrpch.htm

    http://tinyurl.com/6oztj

    Please read http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm on how to post messages to NG's
    Noel Paton, May 9, 2006
    #11
  12. On Tue, 09 May 2006 17:18:08 GMT, "soup" <> wrote:

    >Definately more wires .
    >My computer, hard disc is just behind yellow triangle it has the sticker
    >with writing on attached to it.
    >http://www.sidtech.co.uk/iu/soup771500346120.JPG


    That is one dirty box. Achoo! >:-o
    Olga & Natasha, May 9, 2006
    #12
  13. Richard Fangnail

    soup Guest

    Olga & Natasha wrote:
    > On Tue, 09 May 2006 17:18:08 GMT, "soup" <> wrote:
    >
    > > Definately more wires .
    > > My computer, hard disc is just behind yellow triangle it has the
    > > sticker with writing on attached to it.
    > > http://www.sidtech.co.uk/iu/soup771500346120.JPG

    >
    > That is one dirty box. Achoo! >:-o


    Yup!!
    Since then have replaced a case fan a disc drive (DVD burner instead of
    a CD burner) and have cleaned inside the box and surrounding area ,
    strangely no difference to the running temperature or system speed in
    fact no change I could detect at all, changing the fan did reduce the
    noise though.
    --
    This space intentionally left blank.
    soup, May 10, 2006
    #13
  14. Richard Fangnail

    soup Guest

    Whiskers wrote:
    > (Unless it was built by a real enthusiast, in which case sticky-tape
    > or superglue or chewing-gum could be involved).


    First comp I had (a 386 given to me by a friend) the hard disc was
    nestling on newspaper with an elastic band holding it in place.
    --
    This space intentionally left blank.
    soup, May 10, 2006
    #14
  15. Richard Fangnail

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-10, soup <> wrote:
    > Whiskers wrote:
    >> (Unless it was built by a real enthusiast, in which case sticky-tape
    >> or superglue or chewing-gum could be involved).

    >
    > First comp I had (a 386 given to me by a friend) the hard disc was
    > nestling on newspaper with an elastic band holding it in place.


    Cosy :)) Could be a fire hazard with some modern drives!

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 10, 2006
    #15
  16. Richard Fangnail

    soup Guest

    Whiskers wrote:
    > Cosy :)) Could be a fire hazard with some modern drives!


    This thing was any thing but modern, 4MB of ram, 40MB hard disc. C
    partition on this is 40 GB and the now system has a very old very small
    hard disc.
    --
    This space intentionally left blank.
    soup, May 10, 2006
    #16
  17. Richard Fangnail

    Margolotta Guest

    On Tue, 9 May 2006 20:54:01 +0100, Whiskers wrote
    (in article <>):

    > On 2006-05-09, Richard Fangnail <> wrote:
    >> In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    >> Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?

    >
    > Many wires, usually the data wires are bundled into a single ribbon or
    > round cable, and the power leads are in another bundle. Depending on the
    > design of the case, the shell of the disc drive will attach to the chassis
    > using screws, nuts and bolts, spring clips, or friction, in a 'cradle' or
    > on 'rails' built into or attached to the chassis. (Unless it was built by a
    > real enthusiast, in which case sticky-tape or superglue or chewing-gum
    > could be involved).
    >
    > There are 'removable hard disc' arrangements that allow the disc to be slid
    > in and out like a PC Card - but bigger of course.
    >
    >


    Ah, Whiskers my friend, you've not seen the internals of a Power Mac, have
    you...? No screws, no bundles of wires - the drives slide in, are held in
    place by clips and the power and data cables are just 4" long. They're also
    positioned differently from those in your typical PC; instead of the back of
    the drives pointing towards the back of the case, these point towards the
    side (imagine turning a drive through 90 degrees, from 9 o'clock - standard
    PC config - to 6 o' clock).

    There are NO visible wires in a PM, save the one that attaches the PSU to the
    logic board.

    Wires are the main cause of PCs overheating. Because Macs don't contain many
    wires they rarely overheat (the new MacBook Pros excepted - but then that's
    because Apple put far to much thermal paste on the chip dies - there's a
    spectacular website where a bloke's disassembled his, removed the fans from
    the chips, wiped off the excess paste and replaced it. The temperature
    dropped from 65C to between 25 and 30. Of course, he serviced Macs for a
    living, this shouldn't be attempted by an amateur, obviously).
    Margolotta, May 11, 2006
    #17
  18. Richard Fangnail

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2006-05-11, Margolotta <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 9 May 2006 20:54:01 +0100, Whiskers wrote
    > (in article <>):
    >
    >> On 2006-05-09, Richard Fangnail <> wrote:
    >>> In a typical desktop computer, how is the harddisk attached inside?
    >>> Just a card, like a PCI slot, or are there more wires?

    >>
    >> Many wires, usually the data wires are bundled into a single ribbon or
    >> round cable, and the power leads are in another bundle. Depending on the
    >> design of the case, the shell of the disc drive will attach to the chassis
    >> using screws, nuts and bolts, spring clips, or friction, in a 'cradle' or
    >> on 'rails' built into or attached to the chassis. (Unless it was built by a
    >> real enthusiast, in which case sticky-tape or superglue or chewing-gum
    >> could be involved).
    >>
    >> There are 'removable hard disc' arrangements that allow the disc to be slid
    >> in and out like a PC Card - but bigger of course.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Ah, Whiskers my friend, you've not seen the internals of a Power Mac, have
    > you...? No screws, no bundles of wires - the drives slide in, are held in
    > place by clips and the power and data cables are just 4" long. They're also
    > positioned differently from those in your typical PC; instead of the back of
    > the drives pointing towards the back of the case, these point towards the
    > side (imagine turning a drive through 90 degrees, from 9 o'clock - standard
    > PC config - to 6 o' clock).
    >
    > There are NO visible wires in a PM, save the one that attaches the PSU to the
    > logic board.
    >
    > Wires are the main cause of PCs overheating. Because Macs don't contain many
    > wires they rarely overheat (the new MacBook Pros excepted - but then that's
    > because Apple put far to much thermal paste on the chip dies - there's a
    > spectacular website where a bloke's disassembled his, removed the fans from
    > the chips, wiped off the excess paste and replaced it. The temperature
    > dropped from 65C to between 25 and 30. Of course, he serviced Macs for a
    > living, this shouldn't be attempted by an amateur, obviously).


    Power Macs aren't "typical" ;))

    The components in a Mac have just as many wires and cables as those in a
    typical PC, but the Mac is more likely to have the cables and wires made
    for the particular model of computer whereas most PCs make do with
    standard off-the-shelf pre-assembled cables so that there is usually a lot
    of surplus length and badly-arranged placing of the differeent components.

    It is certainly possible to build a PC that is as neat and well-arranged as
    a Mac - if you assemble your own cables and choose a decent case (or make
    your own).

    Badly-applied thermal paste has afflicted a few PCs too. It isn't really
    all that difficult to unclip the heatsink, clean up the contact surfaces,
    and apply fresh gloop - but Mac users tend not to be inclined to try that
    sort of thing.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, May 11, 2006
    #18
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