How important are lens hoods?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tom Hise, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. Tom Hise

    Tom Hise Guest

    I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    hood to go with it.

    My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.

    I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    and family and occasionally post on the web.

    Thanks in advance,

    Tom Hise
    Tom Hise, Mar 13, 2010
    #1
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  2. Tom Hise

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 08:55:15 -0600, Tom Hise <> wrote:

    >I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >(30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >hood to go with it.
    >
    >My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    >I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >

    A lens hood reduces lens flare, but I haven't experienced much of a
    problem with lens flare when not using a hood. My lenses are equipped
    with those roll-back threaded rubber hoods, but to act as bumpers to
    prevent the lens from being banged-up.

    I seriously doubt if you'll ever miss a photo because of the lack of a
    hood, but you may ding your lens.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 13, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tom Hise

    Paul Furman Guest

    Tom Hise wrote:
    > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    > hood to go with it.
    >
    > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    > and family and occasionally post on the web.


    I don't generally use them. If flare is an issue, I'll hold my hand up
    to block the sun from hitting the front element. There's two kinds of
    flare: veiling flare and ghosting. The latter is those colorful circles,
    often repeating in the opposite corner from the sun and veiling flare is
    just a white haze, sometimes evenly covering the whole frame, reducing
    contrast.

    Lenses vary in their susceptibility to flare and tendency for ghosting.
    Stopping down a fast lens generally reduces flare and lenses with
    smaller front elements generally have less trouble. Shooting into the
    sun, a hood won't help, shooting away from the sun it's not needed, so
    it's mostly an issue when the sun just glances across the front of the
    lens and often hoods are not really big enough for that so a carefully
    positioned hand can work better (although it makes a mess of hand
    holding stability).

    Movie cameras use elaborate rectangular bellows with flaps and little
    black cards on a flexible arm for trouble spots sometimes.
    http://images.google.com/images?q=matte box

    When buying really old lenses, choose the coated version, often
    indicated as 'MC' for multi-coated. Research the lens' versions,
    sometimes there are improved coatings in later models. Some of Nikon's
    newer lenses are given an 'N' designation for nano-crystal coating.
    Paul Furman, Mar 13, 2010
    #3
  4. Tom Hise wrote:
    > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    > hood to go with it.
    >
    > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    > and family and occasionally post on the web.


    I always use a lens hood, more for protection of the lens than for
    necessity to block out extraneous light sources. I find it's better than
    a filter for my purposes.

    --
    john mcwilliams
    John McWilliams, Mar 13, 2010
    #4
  5. Tom Hise

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 11:35:17 -0500, "Neil Harrington" <> wrote:
    :
    : "Tom Hise" <> wrote in message
    : news:nHNmn.415669$1.easynews.com...
    : > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    : > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    : > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    : > hood to go with it.
    : >
    : > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    : > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    : >
    : > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    : > and family and occasionally post on the web.
    :
    : Theoretically the lens hood should improve the contrast of pictures (taken
    : outdoors at least) by excluding a good deal of the non-image-forming light.
    : Whether you would ever be able to SEE such improvement is somewhat
    : questionable, unless the sun or other bright light source were in a position
    : where it would shine directly on the lens surface, and perhaps not even
    : then.
    :
    : Personally I always use a hood -- when possible -- when shooting outdoors,
    : on the principle that it may help and can't hurt, and also provides some
    : physical protection for the lens. Since with the Nikkors you mention (I'm
    : assuming that's what your 70-300 is as well as the 18-135) the hoods easily
    : reverse on each lens for carrying, they add almost no bulk or weight, so I
    : can't see any benefit to leaving them home.

    A good point that I was going to make if you hadn't. All decent lens hoods
    either collapse or reverse.

    : Ken Rockwell (www.kenrockwell.com) on the other hand has said he never uses
    : a lens hood. But he does use his hand to shade the lens, which to me seems
    : more of a bother than using a hood -- and is probably less effective
    : besides, unless he paints that hand matte black.

    Does Rockwell always use a tripod? I wouldn't want to try to hold a full-size
    digital camera steady with one hand.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Mar 13, 2010
    #5
  6. Tom Hise

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:27:23 -0500, "Neil Harrington" <>
    wrote:

    >I'm sure Rockwell doesn't always use a tripod, no. The photo of him at the
    >front of his site shows him using a Nikon with some monster lens on a
    >monopod, one hand on the camera and the other steadying the lens and
    >monopod. So that leaves him all out of hands and nothing to shade the lens
    >as he says he does. (The image is flipped you'll notice, which gave rise to
    >Rockwell's b.s. story about a "special left-handed Nikon." He is not always
    >absolutely believable, which he admits himself.)
    >

    Left-handed camera? I'm left-handed, and I've never felt that the
    ergonomics of a camera were left- or right-hand favored. The only
    left-handed device that I own is a circular saw. I've tried
    left-handed scissors, but I don't find them much of an advantage.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 13, 2010
    #6
  7. Tom Hise

    S.G. Guest

    On 13.3.2010. 15:55, Tom Hise wrote:
    > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    > hood to go with it.
    >
    > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    > and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Tom Hise
    >



    It reduces lens flare if you have some strong light coming from the side
    or in front of the lens.
    S.G., Mar 13, 2010
    #7
  8. Tom Hise

    S.G. Guest

    On 13.3.2010. 15:55, Tom Hise wrote:
    > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    > hood to go with it.
    >
    > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    > and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Tom Hise
    >



    ....and it's generally not a big deal carrying them around because you
    can always attach them upside down to your lens.
    S.G., Mar 13, 2010
    #8
  9. Tom Hise

    NameHere Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 08:55:15 -0600, Tom Hise <> wrote:

    >I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >(30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >hood to go with it.
    >
    >My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >
    >I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >
    >Thanks in advance,
    >
    >Tom Hise


    Any lens-flare from the sun or other bright lights I've learned to
    effectively cancel out by just using my hand or a well-placed finger to the
    side of the lens. My photography style demands I pack light and be at the
    ready all the time. I don't have time nor space to pack extraneous
    accessories that will cause me to miss shots.

    Some will claim that a rubberized lens-hood is great damage protection, but
    I counter that if you don't take those "accessory" steps to protect your
    camera then you'll be a little more careful with it overall. If you think
    your camera is safe you won't pay attention to it as it's swinging against
    the side of a cliff wall or brick wall while hiking or touristing. If it
    isn't protected by hoods or daylight filters you'll pay attention and
    protect all of it from harm, as it should be. You won't become complacent.
    NameHere, Mar 13, 2010
    #9
  10. Tom Hise

    NameHere Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 12:42:31 -0500, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 11:35:17 -0500, "Neil Harrington" <> wrote:
    >:
    >: "Tom Hise" <> wrote in message
    >: news:nHNmn.415669$1.easynews.com...
    >: > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >: > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >: > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >: > hood to go with it.
    >: >
    >: > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >: > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >: >
    >: > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >: > and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >:
    >: Theoretically the lens hood should improve the contrast of pictures (taken
    >: outdoors at least) by excluding a good deal of the non-image-forming light.
    >: Whether you would ever be able to SEE such improvement is somewhat
    >: questionable, unless the sun or other bright light source were in a position
    >: where it would shine directly on the lens surface, and perhaps not even
    >: then.
    >:
    >: Personally I always use a hood -- when possible -- when shooting outdoors,
    >: on the principle that it may help and can't hurt, and also provides some
    >: physical protection for the lens. Since with the Nikkors you mention (I'm
    >: assuming that's what your 70-300 is as well as the 18-135) the hoods easily
    >: reverse on each lens for carrying, they add almost no bulk or weight, so I
    >: can't see any benefit to leaving them home.
    >
    >A good point that I was going to make if you hadn't. All decent lens hoods
    >either collapse or reverse.
    >
    >: Ken Rockwell (www.kenrockwell.com) on the other hand has said he never uses
    >: a lens hood. But he does use his hand to shade the lens, which to me seems
    >: more of a bother than using a hood -- and is probably less effective
    >: besides, unless he paints that hand matte black.
    >
    >Does Rockwell always use a tripod? I wouldn't want to try to hold a full-size
    >digital camera steady with one hand.
    >
    >Bob


    If you had ever used a camera in your lifetime, you'd find out that that's
    not true. You hold it with both hands, but the hand cradling the lens is
    shifted to also block any flare, or just using one or two fingers to
    accomplish the same.

    Now kindly go back to your other newsgroups where you won't be outed so
    easily for the armchair-expert-only that you are.
    NameHere, Mar 13, 2010
    #10
  11. Tom Hise

    NameHere Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:27:23 -0500, "Neil Harrington" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Robert Coe" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 11:35:17 -0500, "Neil Harrington" <>
    >> wrote:
    >> :
    >> : "Tom Hise" <> wrote in message
    >> : news:nHNmn.415669$1.easynews.com...
    >> : > I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul
    >> around
    >> : > with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >> : > (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a
    >> different
    >> : > hood to go with it.
    >> : >
    >> : > My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely
    >> to
    >> : > miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >> : >
    >> : > I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show
    >> friends
    >> : > and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >> :
    >> : Theoretically the lens hood should improve the contrast of pictures
    >> (taken
    >> : outdoors at least) by excluding a good deal of the non-image-forming
    >> light.
    >> : Whether you would ever be able to SEE such improvement is somewhat
    >> : questionable, unless the sun or other bright light source were in a
    >> position
    >> : where it would shine directly on the lens surface, and perhaps not even
    >> : then.
    >> :
    >> : Personally I always use a hood -- when possible -- when shooting
    >> outdoors,
    >> : on the principle that it may help and can't hurt, and also provides some
    >> : physical protection for the lens. Since with the Nikkors you mention
    >> (I'm
    >> : assuming that's what your 70-300 is as well as the 18-135) the hoods
    >> easily
    >> : reverse on each lens for carrying, they add almost no bulk or weight, so
    >> I
    >> : can't see any benefit to leaving them home.
    >>
    >> A good point that I was going to make if you hadn't. All decent lens hoods
    >> either collapse or reverse.
    >>
    >> : Ken Rockwell (www.kenrockwell.com) on the other hand has said he never
    >> uses
    >> : a lens hood. But he does use his hand to shade the lens, which to me
    >> seems
    >> : more of a bother than using a hood -- and is probably less effective
    >> : besides, unless he paints that hand matte black.
    >>
    >> Does Rockwell always use a tripod? I wouldn't want to try to hold a
    >> full-size
    >> digital camera steady with one hand.

    >
    >I suppose he might wrap his left hand around the very front of the lens in
    >such a way that it shades the lens and still helps support the camera,
    >though that seems very awkward to me. I've never tried it.


    Of course you haven't. You've never held one camera in your life. You've
    just made that painfully obvious to everyone.
    NameHere, Mar 13, 2010
    #11
  12. Tom Hise

    NameHere Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 19:26:34 +0100, Alfred Molon <>
    wrote:

    >I discovered the importance of lens hoods when I was in a cave taking
    >some photos with long exposure times. It was very dark and there was a
    >relatively strong light source from the side (the cave opening). In that
    >situation the lens hood made really a huge difference.


    If needing to pack light, a lens-cap and piece of tape will do the same.
    NameHere, Mar 13, 2010
    #12
  13. On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 11:35:17 -0500, Neil Harrington wrote:

    > Ken Rockwell (www.kenrockwell.com) on the other hand has said he never
    > uses a lens hood. But he does use his hand to shade the lens, which to
    > me seems more of a bother than using a hood -- and is probably less
    > effective besides, unless he paints that hand matte black.


    Why would you need to paint it black? If our hand is between a lightsource
    and the lens, light from the source reflecting off your hand never reaches
    the lens.

    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Mar 13, 2010
    #13
  14. Tom Hise

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:29:05 -0600, NameHere <>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 08:55:15 -0600, Tom Hise <> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >>with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >>(30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >>hood to go with it.
    >>
    >>My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >>miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >>
    >>I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >>and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >>
    >>Thanks in advance,
    >>
    >>Tom Hise

    >
    >Any lens-flare from the sun or other bright lights I've learned to
    >effectively cancel out by just using my hand or a well-placed finger to the
    >side of the lens. My photography style demands I pack light and be at the
    >ready all the time. I don't have time nor space to pack extraneous
    >accessories that will cause me to miss shots.
    >
    >Some will claim that a rubberized lens-hood is great damage protection, but
    >I counter that if you don't take those "accessory" steps to protect your
    >camera then you'll be a little more careful with it overall. If you think
    >your camera is safe you won't pay attention to it as it's swinging against
    >the side of a cliff wall or brick wall while hiking or touristing. If it
    >isn't protected by hoods or daylight filters you'll pay attention and
    >protect all of it from harm, as it should be. You won't become complacent.


    I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.

    This guy just likes to post whether or not he knows anything about the
    subject.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 13, 2010
    #14
  15. Tom Hise

    Ofnuts Guest

    On 13/03/2010 23:02, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:29:05 -0600, NameHere<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 08:55:15 -0600, Tom Hise<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >>> with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >>> (30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >>> hood to go with it.
    >>>
    >>> My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >>> miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >>>
    >>> I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >>> and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance,
    >>>
    >>> Tom Hise

    >>
    >> Any lens-flare from the sun or other bright lights I've learned to
    >> effectively cancel out by just using my hand or a well-placed finger to the
    >> side of the lens. My photography style demands I pack light and be at the
    >> ready all the time. I don't have time nor space to pack extraneous
    >> accessories that will cause me to miss shots.
    >>
    >> Some will claim that a rubberized lens-hood is great damage protection, but
    >> I counter that if you don't take those "accessory" steps to protect your
    >> camera then you'll be a little more careful with it overall. If you think
    >> your camera is safe you won't pay attention to it as it's swinging against
    >> the side of a cliff wall or brick wall while hiking or touristing. If it
    >> isn't protected by hoods or daylight filters you'll pay attention and
    >> protect all of it from harm, as it should be. You won't become complacent.

    >
    > I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    > don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.
    >
    > This guy just likes to post whether or not he knows anything about the
    > subject.
    >
    >



    --
    Bertrand
    Ofnuts, Mar 13, 2010
    #15
  16. Tom Hise

    Ofnuts Guest

    On 13/03/2010 23:02, tony cooper wrote:
    > I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    > don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.


    No true for all. I own a brodge camera that come with a hood. However,
    since the hood must be wide enough for the smallest focal length, it is
    about useless at the other side of the range (except as a shock protection).


    --
    Bertrand
    Ofnuts, Mar 13, 2010
    #16
  17. Tom Hise

    NameHere Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 17:02:48 -0500, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 13:29:05 -0600, NameHere <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 08:55:15 -0600, Tom Hise <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm trying to reduce the volume of camera related stuff that I haul around
    >>>with me when traveling. I use a Nikon D80 with three different lenses
    >>>(30mm f1.4, 18-135mm F3.5, and 70-300mm f4.5). Each lens has a different
    >>>hood to go with it.
    >>>
    >>>My question is, just how important are lens hoods? Would I be likely to
    >>>miss any 'great' shots if I stopped carrying the hoods.
    >>>
    >>>I am not a pro, just an amateur who takes photos for fun, to show friends
    >>>and family and occasionally post on the web.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks in advance,
    >>>
    >>>Tom Hise

    >>
    >>Any lens-flare from the sun or other bright lights I've learned to
    >>effectively cancel out by just using my hand or a well-placed finger to the
    >>side of the lens. My photography style demands I pack light and be at the
    >>ready all the time. I don't have time nor space to pack extraneous
    >>accessories that will cause me to miss shots.
    >>
    >>Some will claim that a rubberized lens-hood is great damage protection, but
    >>I counter that if you don't take those "accessory" steps to protect your
    >>camera then you'll be a little more careful with it overall. If you think
    >>your camera is safe you won't pay attention to it as it's swinging against
    >>the side of a cliff wall or brick wall while hiking or touristing. If it
    >>isn't protected by hoods or daylight filters you'll pay attention and
    >>protect all of it from harm, as it should be. You won't become complacent.

    >
    >I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    >don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.
    >
    >This guy just likes to post whether or not he knows anything about the
    >subject.


    Damn, are you ever an ignorant an inexperienced **** of a troll. Again
    proving you've never touched any camera in your lifetime.
    NameHere, Mar 13, 2010
    #17
  18. Tom Hise

    Ray Fischer Guest

    NameHere <> wrote:
    >On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 17:02:48 -0500, tony cooper
    >>I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    >>don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.
    >>
    >>This guy just likes to post whether or not he knows anything about the
    >>subject.

    >
    >Damn, are you ever an ignorant an inexperienced **** of a troll.


    Go away, dumbshit troll.

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, Mar 13, 2010
    #18
  19. Tom Hise

    Tom Hise Guest

    On Sat, 13 Mar 2010 17:02:48 -0500, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    >I thought this was one of the skins of the P&S spammer. P&S cameras
    >don't accept lens hoods because the lens retracts into the body.
    >
    >This guy just likes to post whether or not he knows anything about the
    >subject.


    I appreciate all the constructive comments people posted. How a simple
    question can turn into an excuse to vilify other posters is beyond my
    comprehension.

    Anyway, I think my question has been answered adequately.

    Thanks,

    Tom Hise
    Tom Hise, Mar 13, 2010
    #19
  20. Tom Hise

    Peter Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Left-handed camera? I'm left-handed, and I've never felt that the
    > ergonomics of a camera were left- or right-hand favored. The only
    > left-handed device that I own is a circular saw. I've tried
    > left-handed scissors, but I don't find them much of an advantage.


    You will find a big advantage using a left handed screwdriver. Left handed
    monkey wrenches are easier to find.
    (If you really want to drive someone nuts, ask for them in a Wal-Mart or
    Target.)



    --
    Peter
    Peter, Mar 13, 2010
    #20
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