how does DTMF security work?

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by renato.serodio@gmail.com, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Dear all,

    I just learnt that VoIP also does DTMF. Since today security is a very
    important concern, I started wondering: how is DTMF secured?

    A series of services, including banks, offer DTMF interfaces, which
    imply dialing pin codes and the like. This would fall in the 'sensitive
    information' category. Now, how is security implemented, both in normal
    lines and VoIP? How can one ascertain that a given line (bearing in
    mind that you might happen to be across the world, and your
    voice-induced signals will run through a number of networks till they
    reach the machine that makes the authentication) is secure?

    With VoIP, it seems even more complex. What are the conditions for DTMF
    to be transmitted? I understand the softphone or other gear must
    generate the signals; then, the VoIP provider must be able to translate
    the signals to the public telephone line.

    I suppose DTMF security could be related to voice comm security: if it
    is possible to encrypt the data entering the broadband line at the user
    location, then decrypt it at the receiver location (and vice-versa),
    then tone signals would be safe. But can this be implemented? And how
    would a regular telephone be able to do it?

    Regards,

    Renato
     
    , Mar 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear all,
    >
    > I just learnt that VoIP also does DTMF. Since today security is a very
    > important concern, I started wondering: how is DTMF secured?


    Today, it's not.

    > I suppose DTMF security could be related to voice comm security: if it
    > is possible to encrypt the data entering the broadband line at the user
    > location, then decrypt it at the receiver location (and vice-versa),
    > then tone signals would be safe. But can this be implemented?


    Since DTMF is sent as part of the normal RTP stream for a call (though
    possibly with a different codec), it can be secured using SRTP just like the
    rest of the call media. Few if any vendors do this yet, though.

    > And how would a regular telephone be able to do it?


    Regular phones have no security other than physical obstacles.

    S

    --
    Stephen Sprunk "Stupid people surround themselves with smart
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    Stephen Sprunk, Mar 12, 2006
    #2
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