how do you...

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by NOSPAM@NOSPAM.invalid.com, Dec 26, 2004.

  1. Guest

    Hi y'all.

    A question about how do do something on a freeBSD 4.9 box...

    How do you find out how full (or otherwise) a partition is on a freeBSD
    box? What command is best?


    Divine

    --
    43 - for those who require slightly more than the answer to life, the universe
    and everything.
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Enkidu Guest

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 21:41:29 +1300, ""
    <> wrote:

    >Hi y'all.
    >
    >A question about how do do something on a freeBSD 4.9 box...
    >
    >How do you find out how full (or otherwise) a partition is on a freeBSD
    >box? What command is best?
    >

    df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Enkidu Guest

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 21:41:29 +1300, ""
    <> wrote:

    >Hi y'all.
    >
    >A question about how do do something on a freeBSD 4.9 box...
    >
    >How do you find out how full (or otherwise) a partition is on a freeBSD
    >box? What command is best?
    >

    df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Guest

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 22:47:37 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    >>How do you find out how full (or otherwise) a partition is on a freeBSD
    >>box? What command is best?
    >>

    > df doesn't work on freeBSD?


    Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)

    Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.


    Divine

    --
    "Some drink from the fountain of knowledge. Jerry Falwell only gargled."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Guest

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 22:47:37 +1300, Enkidu wrote:

    >>How do you find out how full (or otherwise) a partition is on a freeBSD
    >>box? What command is best?
    >>

    > df doesn't work on freeBSD?


    Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)

    Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.


    Divine

    --
    "Some drink from the fountain of knowledge. Jerry Falwell only gargled."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #5
  6. David Preece Guest

    wrote:
    >>df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    >
    > Thanks for the info - appreciated.


    Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Dec 26, 2004
    #6
  7. David Preece Guest

    wrote:
    >>df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    >
    > Thanks for the info - appreciated.


    Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Dec 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:18:48 +1300, David Preece wrote:

    > wrote:
    >>>df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    >>
    >> Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    >
    > Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.


    ESAD!

    I've also noticed that the daily checks emailed to the root user report on
    the file system usage.


    Divine

    --
    Micro$oft Knowledge Base: "When you try to shut down your Microsoft Windows
    XP-based or Microsoft Windows 2000-based computer, the computer may stop
    responding, and you may receive the following error message: It is now safe
    to turn off your computer."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:18:48 +1300, David Preece wrote:

    > wrote:
    >>>df doesn't work on freeBSD?

    >>
    >> Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    >
    > Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.


    ESAD!

    I've also noticed that the daily checks emailed to the root user report on
    the file system usage.


    Divine

    --
    Micro$oft Knowledge Base: "When you try to shut down your Microsoft Windows
    XP-based or Microsoft Windows 2000-based computer, the computer may stop
    responding, and you may receive the following error message: It is now safe
    to turn off your computer."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #9
  10. In article <pan.2004.12.26.10.40.37.493521@TRACKER>,
    "" <> wrote:

    >Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)
    >
    >Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.


    Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is
    supposed to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in
    any situation where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as
    if the root filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in
    single-user mode), df will display incorrect information.

    /proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    this file instead...
     
    Lawrence D’Oliveiro, Dec 26, 2004
    #10
  11. In article <pan.2004.12.26.10.40.37.493521@TRACKER>,
    "" <> wrote:

    >Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)
    >
    >Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.


    Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is
    supposed to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in
    any situation where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as
    if the root filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in
    single-user mode), df will display incorrect information.

    /proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    this file instead...
     
    Lawrence D’Oliveiro, Dec 26, 2004
    #11
  12. Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 12:32:14 +1300, Lawrence D’Oliveiro wrote:

    > Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is supposed
    > to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in any situation
    > where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as if the root
    > filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in single-user
    > mode), df will display incorrect information.
    >
    > /proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    > kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    > this file instead...


    Cool - thanks for that info too.

    There is probably some good reason for not reading /proc/mounts - what I
    do not know.


    Divine

    --
    "What some people have against Open Source Software is what Fundamentalist
    Christians or Moslems have against Knowledge."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #12
  13. Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 12:32:14 +1300, Lawrence D’Oliveiro wrote:

    > Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is supposed
    > to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in any situation
    > where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as if the root
    > filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in single-user
    > mode), df will display incorrect information.
    >
    > /proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    > kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    > this file instead...


    Cool - thanks for that info too.

    There is probably some good reason for not reading /proc/mounts - what I
    do not know.


    Divine

    --
    "What some people have against Open Source Software is what Fundamentalist
    Christians or Moslems have against Knowledge."
     
    , Dec 26, 2004
    #13
  14. David Preece Guest

    wrote:
    >>Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    >
    > ESAD!


    Esad?

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Dec 27, 2004
    #14
  15. David Preece Guest

    wrote:
    >>Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    >
    > ESAD!


    Esad?

    Dave
     
    David Preece, Dec 27, 2004
    #15
  16. Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 11:43:44 +1300, ""
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:18:48 +1300, David Preece wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>>>df doesn't work on freeBSD?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    >>
    >> Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    >
    >ESAD!
    >
    >I've also noticed that the daily checks emailed to the root user report on
    >the file system usage.
    >

    If you have sar installed, have a look at that too. Use it all the
    time at work.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 27, 2004
    #16
  17. Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 11:43:44 +1300, ""
    <> wrote:

    >On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 08:18:48 +1300, David Preece wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>>>df doesn't work on freeBSD?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the info - appreciated.

    >>
    >> Similarly useful is du. Do 'du -H --max-depth=1 /usr/share' as an example.

    >
    >ESAD!
    >
    >I've also noticed that the daily checks emailed to the root user report on
    >the file system usage.
    >

    If you have sar installed, have a look at that too. Use it all the
    time at work.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 12:32:14 +1300, Lawrence D’Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In article <pan.2004.12.26.10.40.37.493521@TRACKER>,
    > "" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)
    >>
    >>Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.

    >
    >Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is
    >supposed to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in
    >any situation where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as
    >if the root filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in
    >single-user mode), df will display incorrect information.
    >
    >/proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    >kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    >this file instead...
    >

    Tradition. Plus there are systems around that don't have the procfs. I
    expect a seriously anorexic embedded system might be lacking it.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 27, 2004
    #18
  19. Enkidu Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 12:32:14 +1300, Lawrence D’Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In article <pan.2004.12.26.10.40.37.493521@TRACKER>,
    > "" <> wrote:
    >
    >>Excuse ignorance - didn't know what df did. :eek:)
    >>
    >>Now that I do, I'll make more use of it - it is a very useful wee command.

    >
    >Just a note that, on Linux, df reads the file /etc/mtab, which is
    >supposed to be maintained by the "mount" command. That means that, in
    >any situation where /etc/mtab is not being maintained properly (such as
    >if the root filesystem is mounted read-only because you've booted in
    >single-user mode), df will display incorrect information.
    >
    >/proc/mounts, on the other hand, gets its information directly from the
    >kernel, so it is always correct. I've often wondered why df doesn't read
    >this file instead...
    >

    Tradition. Plus there are systems around that don't have the procfs. I
    expect a seriously anorexic embedded system might be lacking it.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The National Party manifesto can be viewed here:

    http://www.labour.org.nz/policy/index.html
     
    Enkidu, Dec 27, 2004
    #19
  20. Guest

    On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 15:58:38 +0000, nunya feckin bizzo wrote:

    > umm just my 2 cents.. but you want to be careful using linux switches on
    > BSD eg i performed a shutdown -fh now on one of my BSD boxen.. and lived
    > to regret it for a couple days (try it for yourself if you fancy searching
    > google to repair the system


    What did it do to your freeBSD box?

    what does -f do on a freeBSD box? It's not a listed switch on the man page
    for "shutdown" on my freeBSD-4.9 box. On my linux box it's listed as
    disabling the fsck on reboot. (-F enabling fsck)


    Divine

    --
    Micro$oft Knowledge Base: "This problem was first corrected in Windows 2000
    Service Pack 2."
     
    , Dec 27, 2004
    #20
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