How do you operate??

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mark C, Aug 22, 2003.

  1. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    I guess this is sort of a survey:

    Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up with
    a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in your
    shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring that
    it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?

    I happen to shoot many shots and am happy if can judge 10% as SUPERB!

    Any thoughts?

    Ciao,
    Mark C
    Nashville, TN
     
    Mark C, Aug 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark C

    Bryce Guest

    Well, with the advent of digital, I wouldn't be surprised if some people's
    habits have changed. It's a lot cheaper to go crazy now. (and not as
    smelly - unless my dog is sitting next to me)
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. I edit in my brain before I take the shot, as opposed to ripping off
    a bunch and hoping that there's something good in there.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark C wrote:
    > I guess this is sort of a survey:
    >
    > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up with
    > a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in your
    > shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring that
    > it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?


    It depends. If it's the kids in the pool playing I may fire off a lot,
    trying to catch different action shots or expressions.

    If it's something more static I take my time and work more on getting a
    good shot. I might still try three or four different shots of the same
    subject but it's not as "frantic" as action photography.

    The nice thing about digital is I can always edit later and there's no
    cost for processing.
     
    Andrew McDonald, Aug 22, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark C

    Frank ess Guest

    "Mark C" <> wrote in message
    news:bi5hku$5kkna$-berlin.de...
    > I guess this is sort of a survey:
    >
    > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up

    with
    > a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in your
    > shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring that
    > it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?
    >
    > I happen to shoot many shots and am happy if can judge 10% as SUPERB!
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > Ciao,
    > Mark C
    > Nashville, TN
    >
    >


    Sometimes I stop in the middle of a 'shoot' and smile wide and deep at what
    a joy it is to be taking pictures. Some times it seems to me the pictures
    themselves, good as they may be for me and for others, are kind of an
    anti-climax, just icing on the cake of picture-making.

    Last weekend I was four days at an event with millions of possibilities, and
    now I have eight or nine hundred frames to peruse and doctor (have to work
    in that 'operate', right?). Many of them were impossible to catch in a
    meticulous, deliberate way, although I did my best to be prepared at the
    edge of the 'happening'.

    e.g.,
    http://www.fototime.com/inv/2C750A22D7EC2B7


    Others were more susceptible to pre-analysis and setup, and I applied that
    in a degree I believed appropriate to the circumstances and subject.

    http://www.fototime.com/A1662898E6D19E6/orig.jpg

    It'll take months of work to find the best within the hundreds, and part of
    the fuel that will keep me at it is the residual joy from the process of
    changing the light that was into the sight that endures.

    Overall, I'm mostly in your camp: even a blind pig finds an acorn 10% of the
    time. No offense intended.


    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Aug 22, 2003
    #5
  6. "Bryce" <> wrote in message
    news:6Tr1b.40$...
    > Well, with the advent of digital, I wouldn't be surprised if some people's
    > habits have changed. It's a lot cheaper to go crazy now. (and not as
    > smelly - unless my dog is sitting next to me)
    >

    That is what happened to me. I don't think it make my average picture
    better or worse, but with the same success average I get more good shots.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Aug 22, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark C

    Bryce Guest

    and cheaper and no stains on the clothes.
     
    Bryce, Aug 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Mark C

    Ken Durf Guest

    > I edit in my brain before I take the shot, as opposed to ripping off
    > a bunch and hoping that there's something good in there.


    And you don't have to hope very hard if you are happy that just 10% of
    them are good. Give a monkey a camera and you get that.
     
    Ken Durf, Aug 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Ken Durf <> wrote in news::

    >> I edit in my brain before I take the shot, as opposed to ripping off
    >> a bunch and hoping that there's something good in there.

    >
    > And you don't have to hope very hard if you are happy that just 10% of
    > them are good. Give a monkey a camera and you get that.
    >

    You must be very good indeed....maybe one of the best ever. I wish I could
    come close to 10% being superb, maybe I should try something different
    too.....
    --
    Tom Shellberg
    www.shellberg.com
     
    Tom Shellberg, Aug 22, 2003
    #9
  10. "Ken Durf" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    <snip>

    > If you think about it, you can hand a camera to a three year old and take

    them
    > to the zoo and tell them to take pictures of everything and you are going

    to
    > get at least 10% of those shots that are quite good. Even if one of the
    > monkeys at the zoo takes some pictures.
    >
    > Chance gives you 50% odds, but 10% is what you just get taking pictures
    > blindfolded. I actually took some pictures blindfolded once to prove

    this
    > very point and more than 10% came out as quite artistic looking photos.

    If I
    > remember right, I entered one in a photo contest and it won.
    >


    Is one photographer "better" or "worse" than another because he shot fewer
    frames in his or her life?

    Great photography is lighting, composition, and timing. The methods that
    lead to that point are essentially irrelevant when the end result is what
    you're looking for.

    The measure of an artist's work are his successes, not his failures.


    - jz
     
    Jeff Zawrotny, Aug 22, 2003
    #10
  11. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    Ken,

    You make some very good points.

    In all the responses so far......no one, including you, has ventured a
    definition of "Superb", or even asked what it means to me. Is
    "suburb"....simply a clear, well framed shot? If it was, then yes a monkey
    or a child at the zoo could probably render a 10% success rate.

    However, for me, "superb" is when the end result meets or exceeds the
    intention behind the shot. If my intention was to render a rather mediocre
    model in a stunning fashion and I achieve that and she's thrilled.....then
    the shot was superb. I shoot with intention, not abandon......much of what
    I have learned is by 75% trial and error, 15% books, and probably 10% luck.
    FWIW - I once had an instructor who used to say....."You have to be good to
    be lucky".

    Ciao,
    Mark C
    Nashville,TN




    "Ken Durf" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up

    with
    > > a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in

    your
    > > shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring

    that
    > > it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?

    >
    > Neither. It doesn't take me more than a few seconds to take the

    pictures,
    > but most all of them turn out the way I want. I don't take many

    pictures in
    > a session, but there is no extra time to set up either just because I

    don't
    > shoot more frames than I need.
    >
    > > I happen to shoot many shots and am happy if can judge 10% as SUPERB!
    > > Any thoughts?

    >
    > Time to get a new hobby. If a portrait painter only had 10% of his
    > paintings turn out good then you would say the same thing.
    >
    > If someone has a talent for something, you expect more than 75% of the

    work to
    > turn out good, else time to get into something else.
    >
    > If you think about it, you can hand a camera to a three year old and take

    them
    > to the zoo and tell them to take pictures of everything and you are going

    to
    > get at least 10% of those shots that are quite good. Even if one of the
    > monkeys at the zoo takes some pictures.
    >
    > Chance gives you 50% odds, but 10% is what you just get taking pictures
    > blindfolded. I actually took some pictures blindfolded once to prove

    this
    > very point and more than 10% came out as quite artistic looking photos.

    If I
    > remember right, I entered one in a photo contest and it won.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Mark C, Aug 22, 2003
    #11
  12. You are 100% right. How you work is not important. Creativity and
    quality in photography is not defined by how you get to the final product,
    but by the final product.



    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "Jeff Zawrotny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Ken Durf" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > <snip>
    >
    > > If you think about it, you can hand a camera to a three year old and

    take
    > them
    > > to the zoo and tell them to take pictures of everything and you are

    going
    > to
    > > get at least 10% of those shots that are quite good. Even if one of

    the
    > > monkeys at the zoo takes some pictures.
    > >
    > > Chance gives you 50% odds, but 10% is what you just get taking pictures
    > > blindfolded. I actually took some pictures blindfolded once to prove

    > this
    > > very point and more than 10% came out as quite artistic looking photos.

    > If I
    > > remember right, I entered one in a photo contest and it won.
    > >

    >
    > Is one photographer "better" or "worse" than another because he shot fewer
    > frames in his or her life?
    >
    > Great photography is lighting, composition, and timing. The methods that
    > lead to that point are essentially irrelevant when the end result is what
    > you're looking for.
    >
    > The measure of an artist's work are his successes, not his failures.
    >
    >
    > - jz
    >
    >
     
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 22, 2003
    #12
  13. > In all the responses so far......no one, including you, has ventured a
    > definition of "Superb", or even asked what it means to me. Is
    > "suburb"....simply a clear, well framed shot? If it was, then yes a monkey
    > or a child at the zoo could probably render a 10% success rate.
    >
    > However, for me, "superb" is when the end result meets or exceeds the
    > intention behind the shot.


    Unless we are talking about moving action shots, you should know if the shot is
    superb or not before you even press the shutter button.

    > If my intention was to render a rather mediocre
    > model in a stunning fashion and I achieve that and she's thrilled.....then
    > the shot was superb.


    Since people usually don't like the way they look in photos, this is another
    issue entirely. Best to use a situation like photographing a bridge or
    flower.

    > I shoot with intention, not abandon......much of what
    > I have learned is by 75% trial and error, 15% books, and probably 10% luck.


    You don't learn anything by luck, that is just chance and the brain doesn't
    absorb knowledge just by chance.

    > FWIW - I once had an instructor who used to say....."You have to be good to
    > be lucky".


    No, just have rich parents.

    Good people are rarely lucky. Then tend to get all the bad luck. That is
    the way life is set up. In order to survive, you must kill something, else
    starve and die.

    Evil prevails and is rewarded, good is just the short periods of not as much
    evil at a particular time.

    The universe can run and survive without good, but it can not exist without
    evil.

    Just because you may not like to hear it or want to agree, does not make it less
    of a cold hard fact.
     
    Steve Jenkins, Aug 22, 2003
    #13
  14. > but 10% is what you just get taking pictures
    > > blindfolded. I actually took some pictures blindfolded once to prove

    > this
    > > very point and more than 10% came out as quite artistic looking photos.

    > If I
    > > remember right, I entered one in a photo contest and it won.
    > >

    >
    > I don't believe you "remember" at all. I believe you fabricate.


    Must be an easy world when you can just pick and choose what you want to be fact
    and fiction based on what you like and don't like. You can believe whatever
    you like, but no belief can change facts.

    Beliefs, like opinions, are worthless. Facts are golden.
     
    Steve Jenkins, Aug 22, 2003
    #14
  15. Mark C

    Mark C Guest

    Steve,

    With all due respect....you sound very jaded. I suggest you chill out and
    read what you wrote.....and then take you're own advice.

    Hope your day gets better.

    Ciao,
    Mark


    "Steve Jenkins" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > but 10% is what you just get taking pictures
    > > > blindfolded. I actually took some pictures blindfolded once to

    prove
    > > this
    > > > very point and more than 10% came out as quite artistic looking

    photos.
    > > If I
    > > > remember right, I entered one in a photo contest and it won.
    > > >

    > >
    > > I don't believe you "remember" at all. I believe you fabricate.

    >
    > Must be an easy world when you can just pick and choose what you want to

    be fact
    > and fiction based on what you like and don't like. You can believe

    whatever
    > you like, but no belief can change facts.
    >
    > Beliefs, like opinions, are worthless. Facts are golden.
    >
    >
     
    Mark C, Aug 22, 2003
    #15
  16. > You are 100% right. How you work is not important. Creativity and
    > quality in photography is not defined by how you get to the final product,
    > but by the final product.


    Creativity is defined by worthless opinions and personal tastes, Quality is
    defined by the camera you are using.
     
    Steve Jenkins, Aug 22, 2003
    #16
  17. Mark C

    Mike Graham Guest

    In article <bi5hku$5kkna$-berlin.de>, Mark C wrote:

    > I guess this is sort of a survey:
    >
    > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up with
    > a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in your
    > shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring that
    > it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?


    It's kind of weird... I see something I want to take a picture of, and I
    take a quick shot, then I take four or five more 'just in case', and 99% of
    the time the first shot is the best one of the bunch.

    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
     
    Mike Graham, Aug 22, 2003
    #17
  18. Mark C

    mike schmidt Guest

    I just went to Hawaii and took 800 pictures. I toted my 10Dand several
    lenses all over the islands, and paid 2x the normal price for a 256 MB CF
    card when I ran out out memory. Many of my my shoots were worthless and
    deleted the first time I viewed them . But many of them are jewels that I'll
    prize forever.

    Hence, I now consider myself the type that takes as many shots as possible
    because the chances of getting those prized shots are much better.

    "Mark C" <> wrote in message
    news:bi5hku$5kkna$-berlin.de...
    > I guess this is sort of a survey:
    >
    > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up

    with
    > a hand full that are SUPERB! Or are you fastidious and deliberate in your
    > shooting and therefore don't take many pictures in a session figuring that
    > it's worth the extra time to actually set up or stage the shots?
    >
    > I happen to shoot many shots and am happy if can judge 10% as SUPERB!
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > Ciao,
    > Mark C
    > Nashville, TN
    >
    >
     
    mike schmidt, Aug 22, 2003
    #18
  19. Mark C

    Kenny Guest

    "Mark C" <> wrote in message
    news:bi5hku$5kkna$-berlin.de...
    > I guess this is sort of a survey:
    >
    > Are you type of photographer that shoots many, many frames and ends up

    with
    > a hand full that are SUPERB!


    If I can't get 80% keepers out of a days motorsport shooting then I
    reckon I'm off form.

    I must have been at this too long..........

    Kenny
     
    Kenny, Aug 23, 2003
    #19
  20. > Hence, I now consider myself the type that takes as many shots as possible
    > because the chances of getting those prized shots are much better.


    That is because the more pictures you take, the more good pictures you will
    get. For example, you take 800 photos and someone else only takes one, the
    other person can't have more than one good photo. Just a matter of simple
    math.
     
    Steve Jenkins, Aug 23, 2003
    #20
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