How do wired and wireless connections to a home router work?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by polomora, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. polomora

    polomora Guest

    Hello,

    I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my wired/wireless
    LAN.

    Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web at
    the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I first
    enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's wireless
    connection.

    It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    knowledge gaps.

    - If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to the
    wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or wireless -
    to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics configured, but I
    haven't been able to find where.

    - If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and wireless
    accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I assume not,
    since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the router from the
    same address range as the wired connection.

    - If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?

    I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about these
    more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I can learn
    mor about this stuff.

    Many thanks,
    Paul
     
    polomora, Feb 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. Hi
    1. You can easily create a setting that would decide what the preference is
    if the connections are available.
    Here how, http://www.ezlan.net/metrics.html.
    2. If the Wireless is On and No computer is actively using it nothing is
    taken from the Internet Bandwidth “Speed”. I.e. even if the laptop is On
    and connected to the Wireless it does not take any thing of the system if
    you are not doing anything Network related.
    Make sure that your Wireless is secure so other people cannot log into it.
    Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    3. The wire and the wireless are connected together inside the Router.
    Many computers can use both the wire and the wireless at the same time. All
    the computers that are using the same Wireless Router (wire or Wireless) are
    connected to the same LAN.
    Since they are sharing one Internet connection while they are using the
    Internet the Bandwidth (“Speed” ) would be split between them.
    To actually exchange info between the computers (wire or wireless does not
    matter) you have to configure on each computer the File Sharing.
    File Sharing: http://www.ezlan.net/sharing.html
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)


    "polomora" <> wrote in message
    news:J4Kjl.23585$2...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my
    > wired/wireless LAN.
    >
    > Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    > networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web
    > at the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I
    > first enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's
    > wireless connection.
    >
    > It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    > knowledge gaps.
    >
    > - If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to
    > the wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or
    > wireless - to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics
    > configured, but I haven't been able to find where.
    >
    > - If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    > wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    > broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and
    > wireless accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I
    > assume not, since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the
    > router from the same address range as the wired connection.
    >
    > - If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    > mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?
    >
    > I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    > tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about these
    > more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I can
    > learn mor about this stuff.
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Paul
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 9, 2009
    #2
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  3. polomora

    James Egan Guest

    On Mon, 9 Feb 2009 00:41:30 +0100, "polomora" <>
    wrote:

    >Hello,
    >
    >I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my wired/wireless
    >LAN.
    >
    >Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    >networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web at
    >the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I first
    >enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's wireless
    >connection.
    >
    >It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    >knowledge gaps.
    >
    >- If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to the
    >wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or wireless -
    >to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics configured, but I
    >haven't been able to find where.


    The wired will be used in preference. It will have a lower metric. You
    can set manual metrics in the tcp/ip properties.


    >
    >- If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    >wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    >broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and wireless
    >accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I assume not,
    >since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the router from the
    >same address range as the wired connection.
    >
    >- If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    >mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?
    >
    >I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    >tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about these
    >more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I can learn
    >mor about this stuff.
    >



    There are some tutorials on the dd-wrt website which describe setting
    up wireless clients, bridges, repeaters, bridge repeaters etc.

    Although these tutorials relate particularly to using dd-wrt they are
    quite informative generally.
    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Tutorials


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Feb 9, 2009
    #3
  4. polomora

    Paul Moore Guest

    Thanks for the replies, Jack and James.

    For point 2: Does that mean that activity across the wired LAN is also
    broadcast on the wireless section of the LAN, even if no PC is connected to
    it?

    I have two more questions.

    4. At work, I can access two separate LANs from my laptop. The corporate LAN
    130.x.x.x is accessed with the wired LAN connection, and a separate test LAN
    192.168.x.x is accessed with the wireless LAN connection. If I ping a node
    on the 192.x.x.x LAN either from a Cmd window or from Cygwin, how does
    Windows know which connection to use?

    5. If I bridge the two connections, what will happen? I suppose it
    shouldn't work, since the IP address ranges on the two LAN segemnts are
    different?

    Regards,
    Paul

    "polomora" <> wrote in message
    news:J4Kjl.23585$2...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my
    > wired/wireless LAN.
    >
    > Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    > networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web
    > at the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I
    > first enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's
    > wireless connection.
    >
    > It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    > knowledge gaps.
    >
    > - If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to
    > the wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or
    > wireless - to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics
    > configured, but I haven't been able to find where.
    >
    > - If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    > wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    > broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and
    > wireless accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I
    > assume not, since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the
    > router from the same address range as the wired connection.
    >
    > - If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    > mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?
    >
    > I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    > tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about these
    > more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I can
    > learn mor about this stuff.
    >
    > Many thanks,
    > Paul
    >
     
    Paul Moore, Feb 9, 2009
    #4
  5. Hi
    Broadcast is No the correct term.
    In the Router the Internet Signal comes internally out of the Routing
    circuits and it connected to both the Switch (Wire connections) and the
    Wireless Access Point.
    I.a. as long as the Wireless part of the Router is On the signal is there
    been ready to be used. The only thing that a an Access Point Broadcasts
    when it is idling is its ID name (SSID), those are the name that you see in
    the Wireless Connection Windows when you choose a connection. When an
    external computer choose to connect to the SSID and the traffic starts to
    flow the Internet signal is available to be used. I.e. the water is Not
    flowing all the time they flow when you open the faucet. ;)
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "Paul Moore" <> wrote in message
    news:TL%jl.617$2...
    > Thanks for the replies, Jack and James.
    >
    > For point 2: Does that mean that activity across the wired LAN is also
    > broadcast on the wireless section of the LAN, even if no PC is connected
    > to it?
    >
    > I have two more questions.
    >
    > 4. At work, I can access two separate LANs from my laptop. The corporate
    > LAN 130.x.x.x is accessed with the wired LAN connection, and a separate
    > test LAN 192.168.x.x is accessed with the wireless LAN connection. If I
    > ping a node on the 192.x.x.x LAN either from a Cmd window or from Cygwin,
    > how does Windows know which connection to use?
    >
    > 5. If I bridge the two connections, what will happen? I suppose it
    > shouldn't work, since the IP address ranges on the two LAN segemnts are
    > different?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Paul
    >
    > "polomora" <> wrote in message
    > news:J4Kjl.23585$2...
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my
    >> wired/wireless LAN.
    >>
    >> Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    >> networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web
    >> at the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I
    >> first enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's
    >> wireless connection.
    >>
    >> It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    >> knowledge gaps.
    >>
    >> - If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to
    >> the wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or
    >> wireless - to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics
    >> configured, but I haven't been able to find where.
    >>
    >> - If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    >> wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    >> broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and
    >> wireless accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I
    >> assume not, since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the
    >> router from the same address range as the wired connection.
    >>
    >> - If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    >> mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?
    >>
    >> I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    >> tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about
    >> these more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I
    >> can learn mor about this stuff.
    >>
    >> Many thanks,
    >> Paul
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 9, 2009
    #5
  6. polomora

    James Egan Guest

    On Mon, 9 Feb 2009 20:47:57 +0100, "Paul Moore"
    <> wrote:

    >For point 2: Does that mean that activity across the wired LAN is also
    >broadcast on the wireless section of the LAN, even if no PC is connected to
    >it?
    >


    No.


    >I have two more questions.
    >
    >4. At work, I can access two separate LANs from my laptop. The corporate LAN
    >130.x.x.x is accessed with the wired LAN connection, and a separate test LAN
    >192.168.x.x is accessed with the wireless LAN connection. If I ping a node
    >on the 192.x.x.x LAN either from a Cmd window or from Cygwin, how does
    >Windows know which connection to use?
    >


    It looks in the routing table which will tell it which of the two
    interfaces to use. Type "route print" to see the routing table.


    >5. If I bridge the two connections, what will happen? I suppose it
    >shouldn't work, since the IP address ranges on the two LAN segemnts are
    >different?


    That's right.

    There is nothing to stop you routing packets between the two
    interfaces to put your other wireless workstations on the Internet via
    the wired connection (or whatever) but bridging isn't the way to do
    it.


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Feb 10, 2009
    #6
  7. polomora

    Paul Moore Guest

    Jack and James, thanks again.

    "Paul Moore" <> wrote in message
    news:TL%jl.617$2...
    > Thanks for the replies, Jack and James.
    >
    > For point 2: Does that mean that activity across the wired LAN is also
    > broadcast on the wireless section of the LAN, even if no PC is connected
    > to it?
    >
    > I have two more questions.
    >
    > 4. At work, I can access two separate LANs from my laptop. The corporate
    > LAN 130.x.x.x is accessed with the wired LAN connection, and a separate
    > test LAN 192.168.x.x is accessed with the wireless LAN connection. If I
    > ping a node on the 192.x.x.x LAN either from a Cmd window or from Cygwin,
    > how does Windows know which connection to use?
    >
    > 5. If I bridge the two connections, what will happen? I suppose it
    > shouldn't work, since the IP address ranges on the two LAN segemnts are
    > different?
    >
    > Regards,
    > Paul
    >
    > "polomora" <> wrote in message
    > news:J4Kjl.23585$2...
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I have a question about using the wireless capabilities of my
    >> wired/wireless LAN.
    >>
    >> Normally, I use the wired connections to my home router for all my
    >> networking needs. Sometimes, when watching the TV, I like to surf the web
    >> at the same time using my laptop's wireless connection. To do this, I
    >> first enable my router's wireless access and then enable my laptop's
    >> wireless connection.
    >>
    >> It all work very well, but I have some questions, just to fill in my
    >> knowledge gaps.
    >>
    >> - If I leave the wireless connection enabled, and reattach the laptop to
    >> the wired LAN, how does the laptop know which connection - wired or
    >> wireless - to use. I assume that the two modems have separate metrics
    >> configured, but I haven't been able to find where.
    >>
    >> - If I switch off the laptop's wireless modem, but leave the router's
    >> wireless access enabled, is all LAN traffic on the wired LAN segment also
    >> broadcast onto the wireless LAN segment? Is the router's wired and
    >> wireless accesses considered to be across two separate LAN segments? I
    >> assume not, since the wireless connection gets its IP address from the
    >> router from the same address range as the wired connection.
    >>
    >> - If I bridge the wired and wireless connections together, what does this
    >> mean in the case, where both connections are accessing the same LAN?
    >>
    >> I've been searching the web for answers to these questions. Lots of
    >> tutorials about setting up a home network, but no information about
    >> these more detailed topics. Can anyone help, or point me to somewhere I
    >> can learn mor about this stuff.
    >>
    >> Many thanks,
    >> Paul
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Paul Moore, Feb 10, 2009
    #7
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