How can I remove the dust which came inside my lens ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by for.fun@laposte.net, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Hi all,

    A few weeks ago, I noticed that there was some dust on my lens (this
    is the original zoom provided with the Nikon D70 camera) so I used a
    really bad quality rag (I did not know it was so bad as this time) to
    clean the lens.
    Unfortunately, some small pieces of rag came inside the lens (and came
    between the lenses).

    Actually, I do not know how to remove the dust which came inside. I do
    not want to disassemble the lens because I am pretty sure I will not
    how to reassemble it right. Moreover I am afraid of adding some more
    dust doing this.
    Now, I have plenty of dark spots all all the pictures I take !

    Does anyone have an idea which could help ?

    Thanks in advance.
    , Mar 20, 2008
    #1
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  2. <> wrote in message news:...

    > A few weeks ago, I noticed that there was some dust on my lens (this
    > is the original zoom provided with the Nikon D70 camera) so I used a
    > really bad quality rag (I did not know it was so bad as this time) to
    > clean the lens.
    > Unfortunately, some small pieces of rag came inside the lens (and came
    > between the lenses).
    >
    > Actually, I do not know how to remove the dust which came inside. I do
    > not want to disassemble the lens because I am pretty sure I will not
    > how to reassemble it right. Moreover I am afraid of adding some more
    > dust doing this.
    > Now, I have plenty of dark spots all all the pictures I take !
    >
    > Does anyone have an idea which could help ?


    It is very unlikely that the dust in the lens (or on the front or
    rear, if any is still there) will be imaged. Such dust generally
    just acts to "slow" the lens a tiny fraction, and its effects should
    not be seen except under VERY unusual conditions. Much
    more likely is your seeing the effects of dust on the sensor,
    where it can cast fairly sharp shadows, especially when small
    lens stops are used. Since you are having trouble cleaning glass,
    maybe you should have the sensor professionally cleaned...
    --
    David Ruether

    www.donferrario.com/ruether
    David Ruether, Mar 20, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On 20 mar, 22:31, "David Ruether" <> wrote:

    > It is very unlikely that the dust in the lens (or on the front or
    > rear, if any is still there) will be imaged. Such dust generally
    > just acts to "slow" the lens a tiny fraction, and its effects should
    > not be seen except under VERY unusual conditions.


    OK so the dust is probably not inside the lens and even if it was the
    case, I would not see it on the pictures.
    That's good news because it did not see any way to remove it but
    dissamble the lens.

    > Much more likely is your seeing the effects of dust on the sensor,
    > where it can cast fairly sharp shadows, especially when small
    > lens stops are used. Since you are having trouble cleaning glass,
    > maybe you should have the sensor professionally cleaned...


    That's probably a good advice but I really would like to try doing it
    myself.
    I will not do the same mistake twice : I will avoid using a dirty or
    bad quality rag and read the advices from the forum.

    => Do I need a special tool for this ?

    Thanks in advance.
    , Mar 21, 2008
    #3
  4. Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 04:06:34 -0700, for.fun wrote:

    > That's probably a good advice but I really would like to try doing it
    > myself.
    > I will not do the same mistake twice : I will avoid using a dirty or bad
    > quality rag and read the advices from the forum.

    To clean your lens first see if a blower lens brush will work (don't
    press the brush on the lens) if this doesn't work use lens cleaner on a
    proper lens cloth dipping a small part of the cloth into the cleaner,
    wipe the soiled surface of the lens with moist cloth allowing the weight
    of the cloth to do the work ( whatever you do don't press on the cloth)
    and allow to dry. Make a point of keeping the lens cap on the lens as
    much as possible and cleaning could then become a fairly rare event.
    >
    > => Do I need a special tool for this ?

    Yes. It is just behind the eyes i.e. before doing anything to a lens -
    THINK.



    --
    Neil
    reverse ra and delete l
    Linux user 335851
    Neil Ellwood, Mar 21, 2008
    #4
  5. George Kerby Guest

    On 3/21/08 6:06 AM, in article
    ,
    "" <> wrote:

    > On 20 mar, 22:31, "David Ruether" <> wrote:
    >
    > => Do I need a special tool for this ?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >

    Any hammer will do. Go for it!

    Seriously, if you have to ask that question, you should not proceed to
    destroy the lens.
    George Kerby, Mar 21, 2008
    #5
  6. George Kerby Guest

    On 3/21/08 7:38 AM, in article , "Neil
    Ellwood" <> wrote:

    > On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 04:06:34 -0700, for.fun wrote:
    >
    >> That's probably a good advice but I really would like to try doing it
    >> myself.
    >> I will not do the same mistake twice : I will avoid using a dirty or bad
    >> quality rag and read the advices from the forum.

    > To clean your lens first see if a blower lens brush will work (don't
    > press the brush on the lens) if this doesn't work use lens cleaner on a
    > proper lens cloth dipping a small part of the cloth into the cleaner,
    > wipe the soiled surface of the lens with moist cloth allowing the weight
    > of the cloth to do the work ( whatever you do don't press on the cloth)
    > and allow to dry. Make a point of keeping the lens cap on the lens as
    > much as possible and cleaning could then become a fairly rare event.
    >>
    >> => Do I need a special tool for this ?

    > Yes. It is just behind the eyes i.e. before doing anything to a lens -
    > THINK.
    >
    >

    Exactly.
    George Kerby, Mar 21, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    On 21 mar, 13:38, Neil Ellwood <>
    wrote:

    > To clean your lens first see if a blower lens brush will work (don't
    > press the brush on the lens) if this doesn't work use lens cleaner on a
    > proper lens cloth dipping a small part of the cloth into the cleaner,
    > wipe the soiled surface of the lens with moist cloth allowing the weight
    > of the cloth to do the work ( whatever you do don't press on the cloth)
    > and allow to dry. Make a point of keeping the lens cap on the lens as
    > much as possible and cleaning could then become a fairly rare event.


    The dust problem occurred because I took some pictures in the street
    and I had to oftenly switch between my 2 lenses.
    The street is not the best place for swapping the lenses but I had no
    choice since some of my pictures had to be taken with a specific lens.
    I took care but I could not avoid some dust from coming inside.

    > Yes. It is just behind the eyes i.e. before doing anything to a lens -
    > THINK.


    Of course, I think and that's why I prefer posting here before doing.
    In facts, I asked this because I was not speaking about the lens but
    about the electronic sensor.
    I do not want to permanently damage the sensor because I suppose you
    do not clean it the same way as the lens.
    , Mar 21, 2008
    #7
  8. irwell Guest

    On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 07:43:32 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

    >On 21 mar, 13:38, Neil Ellwood <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> To clean your lens first see if a blower lens brush will work (don't
    >> press the brush on the lens) if this doesn't work use lens cleaner on a
    >> proper lens cloth dipping a small part of the cloth into the cleaner,
    >> wipe the soiled surface of the lens with moist cloth allowing the weight
    >> of the cloth to do the work ( whatever you do don't press on the cloth)
    >> and allow to dry. Make a point of keeping the lens cap on the lens as
    >> much as possible and cleaning could then become a fairly rare event.

    >
    >The dust problem occurred because I took some pictures in the street
    >and I had to oftenly switch between my 2 lenses.
    >The street is not the best place for swapping the lenses but I had no
    >choice since some of my pictures had to be taken with a specific lens.
    >I took care but I could not avoid some dust from coming inside.
    >
    >> Yes. It is just behind the eyes i.e. before doing anything to a lens -
    >> THINK.

    >
    >Of course, I think and that's why I prefer posting here before doing.
    >In facts, I asked this because I was not speaking about the lens but
    >about the electronic sensor.
    >I do not want to permanently damage the sensor because I suppose you
    >do not clean it the same way as the lens.
    >
    >
    >

    Do a Google search, there are people who have done this
    and give good tear down instructions complete with photos.

    Some cameras are prone to getting small amounts of lint
    inside them, so a good bag is the best protection and care
    with cleaning, as you now know.
    irwell, Mar 21, 2008
    #8
  9. Guest

    On 21 mar, 16:36, irwell <> wrote:

    > Do a Google search, there are people who have done this
    > and give good tear down instructions complete with photos.


    I already did a search but there are several methods : some of them
    involve a vacuum cleaner and some others a cleaning liquid.
    Anyway, I am going to search deeper.

    > Some cameras are prone to getting small amounts of lint
    > inside them, so a good bag is the best protection and care
    > with cleaning, as you now know.


    Thanks for the bag's trick.
    , Mar 21, 2008
    #9
  10. Roy G Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > A few weeks ago, I noticed that there was some dust on my lens (this
    > is the original zoom provided with the Nikon D70 camera) so I used a
    > really bad quality rag (I did not know it was so bad as this time) to
    > clean the lens.
    > Unfortunately, some small pieces of rag came inside the lens (and came
    > between the lenses).
    >
    > Actually, I do not know how to remove the dust which came inside. I do
    > not want to disassemble the lens because I am pretty sure I will not
    > how to reassemble it right. Moreover I am afraid of adding some more
    > dust doing this.
    > Now, I have plenty of dark spots all all the pictures I take !
    >
    > Does anyone have an idea which could help ?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >


    Judging by the level of technical expertise, you have displayed so far, I
    would seriously advise that you get your camera sensor cleaned by a
    professional repairer.

    Damaging a lens is serious, but damaging the sensor is fatal to the camera.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Mar 22, 2008
    #10
  11. Savageduck Guest

    On 2008-03-21 07:43:32 -0700, said:

    > On 21 mar, 13:38, Neil Ellwood <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> To clean your lens first see if a blower lens brush will work (don't
    >> press the brush on the lens) if this doesn't work use lens cleaner on a
    >> proper lens cloth dipping a small part of the cloth into the cleaner,
    >> wipe the soiled surface of the lens with moist cloth allowing the weight
    >> of the cloth to do the work ( whatever you do don't press on the cloth)
    >> and allow to dry. Make a point of keeping the lens cap on the lens as
    >> much as possible and cleaning could then become a fairly rare event.

    >
    > The dust problem occurred because I took some pictures in the street
    > and I had to oftenly switch between my 2 lenses.
    > The street is not the best place for swapping the lenses but I had no
    > choice since some of my pictures had to be taken with a specific lens.
    > I took care but I could not avoid some dust from coming inside.
    >
    >> Yes. It is just behind the eyes i.e. before doing anything to a lens -
    >> THINK.

    >
    > Of course, I think and that's why I prefer posting here before doing.
    > In facts, I asked this because I was not speaking about the lens but
    > about the electronic sensor.
    > I do not want to permanently damage the sensor because I suppose you
    > do not clean it the same way as the lens.


    Here, go and educate yourself. Just remember the best advice has
    already been given;
    THINK.

    http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/
    http://www.kinetronics.com/
    http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/eclipse.html
    https://www.micro-tools.com/store/home.aspx

    A rag indeed??

    Good luck,
    Savageduck
    Savageduck, Mar 22, 2008
    #11
  12. Guest

    , Mar 22, 2008
    #12
  13. C J Campbell Guest

    On 2008-03-21 04:06:34 -0700, said:

    > On 20 mar, 22:31, "David Ruether" <> wrote:
    >
    >> It is very unlikely that the dust in the lens (or on the front or
    >> rear, if any is still there) will be imaged. Such dust generally
    >> just acts to "slow" the lens a tiny fraction, and its effects should
    >> not be seen except under VERY unusual conditions.

    >
    > OK so the dust is probably not inside the lens and even if it was the
    > case, I would not see it on the pictures.
    > That's good news because it did not see any way to remove it but
    > dissamble the lens.
    >
    >> Much more likely is your seeing the effects of dust on the sensor,
    >> where it can cast fairly sharp shadows, especially when small
    >> lens stops are used. Since you are having trouble cleaning glass,
    >> maybe you should have the sensor professionally cleaned...

    >
    > That's probably a good advice but I really would like to try doing it
    > myself.
    > I will not do the same mistake twice : I will avoid using a dirty or
    > bad quality rag and read the advices from the forum.
    >
    > => Do I need a special tool for this ?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.


    Do a Google search on sensor cleaning. There are many methods, but it
    requires a light touch. A lens cloth or any other material will
    certainly leave lots of dust on the sensor. So you need the right
    cleaning materials.

    Most camera stores sell sensor cleaning kits.


    --
    Waddling Eagle
    World Famous Flight Instructor
    C J Campbell, Mar 22, 2008
    #13
  14. Guest

    On 22 mar, 23:29, C J Campbell <>
    wrote:

    > > On 20 mar, 22:31, "David Ruether" <> wrote:
    > >> Much more likely is your seeing the effects of dust on the sensor,


    I confirm : I applied one of the cleaning method advised on a web site
    (I took several pictures of my white LCD screen, equalized the color
    levels which revealed the dust). The method revealed many black dust
    spots. Taking the pictures with a different lens did not change the
    result. So, I have to clean the sensor.

    > Do a Google search on sensor cleaning. There are many methods, but it
    > requires a light touch. A lens cloth or any other material will
    > certainly leave lots of dust on the sensor. So you need the right
    > cleaning materials.
    >
    > Most camera stores sell sensor cleaning kits.


    I just ordered the Delkin SensorScope system (http://www.delkin.com/
    products/sensorscope/sensorsystem.html) which is one of the method
    advised on the www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com web site (advised by
    Savageduck)
    This system was advised on many other web sites so I suppose it is
    good.
    The advantage of the system is you can magnify and see the dust on the
    sensor so you can directly check if the it is clean.

    Thanks for helping.
    , Mar 23, 2008
    #14
  15. Guest

    , Mar 23, 2008
    #15
  16. Savageduck Guest

    On 2008-03-23 01:42:40 -0700, said:

    > On 22 mar, 23:29, C J Campbell <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> On 20 mar, 22:31, "David Ruether" <> wrote:
    >>>> Much more likely is your seeing the effects of dust on the sensor,

    >
    > I confirm : I applied one of the cleaning method advised on a web site
    > (I took several pictures of my white LCD screen, equalized the color
    > levels which revealed the dust). The method revealed many black dust
    > spots. Taking the pictures with a different lens did not change the
    > result. So, I have to clean the sensor.
    >
    >> Do a Google search on sensor cleaning. There are many methods, but it
    >> requires a light touch. A lens cloth or any other material will
    >> certainly leave lots of dust on the sensor. So you need the right
    >> cleaning materials.
    >>
    >> Most camera stores sell sensor cleaning kits.

    >
    > I just ordered the Delkin SensorScope system (http://www.delkin.com/
    > products/sensorscope/sensorsystem.html) which is one of the method
    > advised on the www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com web site (advised by
    > Savageduck)
    > This system was advised on many other web sites so I suppose it is
    > good.
    > The advantage of the system is you can magnify and see the dust on the
    > sensor so you can directly check if the it is clean.
    >
    > Thanks for helping.


    My pleasure, glad to help.

    It is always best to make an educated decission and have the
    information from reliable sources. For the most part taking care when
    changing lenses will keep dust off the sensor.
    Also some zoom lenses can behave like a bellows and can pump air (and
    contaminants) into the mirror chamber.

    Personally, I believe the Delkin system is one that is more an
    expensive tool box addition, than necessary tool, nice to have though.
    I don't need to see the dust on the low pass filter to know it is
    there, I can see it on color, or field test shots. The thing to note
    here is, things are reversed. If the offending dust is shown on the
    upper left of the image, for example, it will be found on the lower
    right of the sensor.

    I use a non-aerosol blower, such as a Giotto, to remove loose dust.
    If the dust isn't moved and it is one or two pieces clearly visible on
    the area of the sensor you know to be contaminated I use the
    Kinetronics Speckgrabber http://tiny.cc/jzEQ9

    If wet cleaning is required I move to Eclipse + Pec pads and an
    appropriately sized swab holder.

    It is always best to have the right tools for the job and I have found
    Micro-Tools to be a great and reliable source of "huh!!! they have
    that!" tools.
    https://www.micro-tools.com/

    Any way take your time and be careful cleaning. Be aware that DSLRs are
    vulnerable to dust, so change lenses carfully with that in mind and you
    will find you may only have to clean that sensor once or twice a year.

    Good luck,

    Savageduck
    Savageduck, Mar 23, 2008
    #16
  17. Savageduck Guest

    Savageduck, Mar 23, 2008
    #17
  18. wrote:
    >Here are the links to the pictures I took with my 2 different lenses

    [...]
    >The dust stays at the same place.


    Then obviously the dust is not on the lens but on the sensor.
    It is after all highly unlikely that the dust settles on two different
    lenses in exactly the same way.

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Mar 23, 2008
    #18
  19. Guest

    On 23 mar, 16:00, Savageduck <> wrote:

    > It is always best to make an educated decission and have the
    > information from reliable sources. For the most part taking care when
    > changing lenses will keep dust off the sensor.


    Yes, I used to changing the lens in the street taking care but not
    doing it inside a bag.
    Indeed, this makes the difference.

    > Personally, I believe the Delkin system is one that is more an
    > expensive tool box addition, than necessary tool, nice to have though.


    You are perfectly right but I live in France and we are in a very
    paradoxal situation:
    We have a very poor choice of sensor cleaning products (even in a big
    city like Paris where I live) so we have to go to specialized shops.
    Unfortunately, because there is not a lot of concurrency and because
    foreign products are over-taxed by the French customs, the price are
    very very expensive.
    For example, the Delkin system is around 225$ in France whereas I
    found it around 100$ in the USA. Even with adding the shipment price
    and the tax, I will pay around 100 euros in France. The most basic
    cleaning system I found in France was around 60 euros so I prefer
    spending 40 euros more for the Delking solution.
    And I think the Delkin's magnifier idea is quite good !

    > https://www.micro-tools.com/


    Thanks for the links and all the advices.

    > Any way take your time and be careful cleaning. Be aware that DSLRs are
    > vulnerable to dust, so change lenses carfully with that in mind and you
    > will find you may only have to clean that sensor once or twice a year.


    I never cleant my lens and I just noticed it was dirty now (I bought
    my camera 4 years ago)
    At the begining, I had a few spots but now, it waste all my pictures.

    Have a good Easter WE.
    , Mar 23, 2008
    #19
  20. Savageduck wrote:

    > It is always best to make an educated decission and have the
    > information from reliable sources. For the most part taking care when
    > changing lenses will keep dust off the sensor.
    > Also some zoom lenses can behave like a bellows and can pump air (and
    > contaminants) into the mirror chamber.
    >
    > Personally, I believe the Delkin system is one that is more an
    > expensive tool box addition, than necessary tool, nice to have though.
    > I don't need to see the dust on the low pass filter to know it is
    > there, I can see it on color, or field test shots. The thing to note
    > here is, things are reversed. If the offending dust is shown on the
    > upper left of the image, for example, it will be found on the lower
    > right of the sensor.
    >
    > I use a non-aerosol blower, such as a Giotto, to remove loose dust.
    > If the dust isn't moved and it is one or two pieces clearly visible on
    > the area of the sensor you know to be contaminated I use the
    > Kinetronics Speckgrabber http://tiny.cc/jzEQ9
    >
    > If wet cleaning is required I move to Eclipse + Pec pads and an
    > appropriately sized swab holder.
    >
    > It is always best to have the right tools for the job and I have found
    > Micro-Tools to be a great and reliable source of "huh!!! they have
    > that!" tools.
    > https://www.micro-tools.com/
    >
    > Any way take your time and be careful cleaning. Be aware that DSLRs
    > are vulnerable to dust, so change lenses carfully with that in mind
    > and you will find you may only have to clean that sensor once or
    > twice a year.


    Don't forget this!

    <http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/sensor.htm>




    Rita
    Rita Berkowitz, Mar 24, 2008
    #20
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