How best to SHRINK large digital photos for email file sizes

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Eunice Santorini, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.

    My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).

    Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...

    WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?

    Below is my best attempt at deciphering the algorithm and the Windows
    tools to use (free is best as we are NOT professionals).

    PLEASE critique this note below so that we all benefit from your knowledge.

    Let me know where I am wrong. Please give suggestions as to how to improve
    the algorithm proposed below. All I want is the best free and easy method
    to shrink photos to, say 50 KB or so, keeping the best possible picture.

    Thanks,
    Eunice
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tentative conclusions (based on a two-hour test as shown below):
    A. Using JP2 allowed the SIMPLEST reductions to size; but was incompatible.
    Reducing RESOLUTION (DPI or Pixels per inch) had little affect.
    Reducing JPG QUALITY (from 100% to, say, 50%) has the largest affect.

    B. Quartering the size & halving the quality produced VERY SMALL SIZED JPGs:
    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    To: 480 x 640 pixels ( 36 KB)

    C. Halving the size & quartering the quality produced VERY USABLE JPGs:
    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    To: 960 x 1280 pixels ( 68 KB)
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1. One way to shrink photos for sending in email is to use JPEG 2000 format:

    a) First download the free IrfanView v3.80 photo editor/viewer:
    http://www.irfanview.com

    b) Then, at the same site, download all the plugins, including the:
    LuraTech Lurawave .jp2 JPEG 2000 Plug-in
    (Register that plugin if you plan on resizing photos larger than 640x480.)

    c) When you save as a JP2 file, you can compress to any desired size, e.g.,
    10 x 1024 = 10240 bytes 20 x 1024 = 20480 bytes
    30 x 1024 = 30720 bytes 40 x 1024 = 40960 bytes
    50 x 1024 = 51200 bytes 60 x 1024 = 61440 bytes
    70 x 1024 = 71680 bytes 80 x 1024 = 81920 bytes
    90 x 1024 = 92160 bytes 100 x 1024 = 102400 bytes

    Note: I've found 100x to be best; but 70x is acceptable for emailing.

    These JP2 photos are VERY GOOD (even at this small size of 70 KB)!

    However, the biggest problem with the JP2 format is folks might not have
    a viewer (IrfanView views them just fine but Netscape 7.x does not) and
    the plugin is not free (so we need a better free easy method than JP2).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2. Another way to shrink photos is to use IrfanView on JPG files alone:

    a) First, resize the original JPG photo
    Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212 KB)

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.

    Still, that's too large to email normally.

    b) One way to further shrink this is to reduce the JPEG Save Quality
    to, say, 50%.
    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 58 KB)
    using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 50%.
    This gave acceptable results, it seemed.

    c) Another way I could have shrunk this was to further reduce pixels:
    Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212 KB)
    Then, to reduce further, press the "Half" button (as needed).

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    to (by pressing "Half"): 320 x 427 pixels ( 124 KB)
    using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    But, overall, I didn't like the quality of these results.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    3. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESIZE:

    a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    http://www.lview.com

    Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, & Resolution.

    b) Resize the picture in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 224 KB)
    using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).

    c) Again, when I lower the JPG quality factor, I get appreciable reduction:
    Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 59 KB)
    using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    4. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESOLUTION:

    a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    http://www.lview.com

    Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, & Resolution.

    b) Change resolution in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):

    Image->Resolution->From: 300 pixels per inch (dpi)
    To: 72 pixels per inch (dpi)

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    to: 1920 x 2560 pixels (1,470 KB)
    without any apparentt loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%

    (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).

    c) If I were to also resize the picture by half or so:
    Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    Save as 100% JPEG Quality

    This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    to: 634 x 845 pixels ( 224 KB)
    without any apparent loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).

    However, I get down to the smallest size again by reducing JPG Quality:
    Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    Image->Resize->33% yields 634 x 845 pixels (59 KB)
    Using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    5. Let's take a look at some of the things we've learned so far:

    Note: Simply lowering the resolution did not gain me anything
    (59 KB vs 59 KB)
    by running the same steps w/o reducing the DPI.

    a) The major factor seems to be the QUALITY SETTING.

    For example, if I merely save the ORIGINAL picture at 50% Quality:
    I get a picture of the following statistics:
    1920 x 2560 (347 KB) at 50%

    b) The next major factor seems to be the SIZE:

    For example, if I merely reduce the size by half twice (i.e., 1/4):
    I get a picture of the following statistics:
    480 x 640 (262 KB) at 95%

    c) Yet, I can reduce the kbytes to well below a hundred doing both:
    Yet, if I perform both size reduction by half twice (i.e., to 1/4):
    And, if I save with a QUALITY SETTING of 50%:
    I get a picture of the following statistics:
    480 x 640 (36 KB) at 50%

    Note: The quality of this photo was a bit poor; so strive for >60 KB.

    Reduce by 1/2 to 960 x 1280 & save at 50% = 113 KB with good quality.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    6. One other method to try is the Windows XP Send TO Mail Recipient:

    a) Right click in Windows XP on any photo file & select:
    Send To->Mail Recipient->(o)Make all my pictures smaller
    (o)Medium (fits in a 800 by 600 window)
    [OK]

    b) For Netscape 7.x, this puts the file in c:\temp\moz_mapi\fname.jpg
    with (decent) atributes of: 450 x 600 @ 300 DPI = 57 KB

    c) Note: Settings of "(o)Small (fits in a 640 by 480 window)" resulted
    in a (blurry) picture of 360 x 480 @ 300 DPI = 39 KB

    Better to use the MEDIUM size.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Does anyone know why DPI settings did NOT change file sizes by much?
    Does anyone have a BETTER FREE EASY method for shrinking photos for email?
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Eunice Santorini, Sep 1, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Eunice Santorini

    FK Guest

    Get a program like ACDSee and you can specify
    the size of the image for email. Everything else
    is automatic.

    FK


    "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >
    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).
    >
    > Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    > is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    > are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...
    >
    > WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?
    >
    > Below is my best attempt at deciphering the algorithm and the Windows
    > tools to use (free is best as we are NOT professionals).
    >
    > PLEASE critique this note below so that we all benefit from your

    knowledge.
    >
    > Let me know where I am wrong. Please give suggestions as to how to improve
    > the algorithm proposed below. All I want is the best free and easy method
    > to shrink photos to, say 50 KB or so, keeping the best possible picture.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eunice
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Tentative conclusions (based on a two-hour test as shown below):
    > A. Using JP2 allowed the SIMPLEST reductions to size; but was

    incompatible.
    > Reducing RESOLUTION (DPI or Pixels per inch) had little affect.
    > Reducing JPG QUALITY (from 100% to, say, 50%) has the largest affect.
    >
    > B. Quartering the size & halving the quality produced VERY SMALL SIZED

    JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 480 x 640 pixels ( 36 KB)
    >
    > C. Halving the size & quartering the quality produced VERY USABLE JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 960 x 1280 pixels ( 68 KB)
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 1. One way to shrink photos for sending in email is to use JPEG 2000

    format:
    >
    > a) First download the free IrfanView v3.80 photo editor/viewer:
    > http://www.irfanview.com
    >
    > b) Then, at the same site, download all the plugins, including the:
    > LuraTech Lurawave .jp2 JPEG 2000 Plug-in
    > (Register that plugin if you plan on resizing photos larger than

    640x480.)
    >
    > c) When you save as a JP2 file, you can compress to any desired size,

    e.g.,
    > 10 x 1024 = 10240 bytes 20 x 1024 = 20480 bytes
    > 30 x 1024 = 30720 bytes 40 x 1024 = 40960 bytes
    > 50 x 1024 = 51200 bytes 60 x 1024 = 61440 bytes
    > 70 x 1024 = 71680 bytes 80 x 1024 = 81920 bytes
    > 90 x 1024 = 92160 bytes 100 x 1024 = 102400 bytes
    >
    > Note: I've found 100x to be best; but 70x is acceptable for emailing.
    >
    > These JP2 photos are VERY GOOD (even at this small size of 70 KB)!
    >
    > However, the biggest problem with the JP2 format is folks might not have
    > a viewer (IrfanView views them just fine but Netscape 7.x does not) and
    > the plugin is not free (so we need a better free easy method than JP2).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 2. Another way to shrink photos is to use IrfanView on JPG files alone:
    >
    > a) First, resize the original JPG photo
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    >
    > Still, that's too large to email normally.
    >
    > b) One way to further shrink this is to reduce the JPEG Save Quality
    > to, say, 50%.
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 58 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 50%.
    > This gave acceptable results, it seemed.
    >
    > c) Another way I could have shrunk this was to further reduce pixels:
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Then, to reduce further, press the "Half" button (as needed).
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > to (by pressing "Half"): 320 x 427 pixels ( 124 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    > But, overall, I didn't like the quality of these results.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 3. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESIZE:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Resize the picture in LView (which is more of an editor than

    IrfanView):
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) Again, when I lower the JPG quality factor, I get appreciable

    reduction:
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 59 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 4. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESOLUTION:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Change resolution in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    >
    > Image->Resolution->From: 300 pixels per inch (dpi)
    > To: 72 pixels per inch (dpi)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 1920 x 2560 pixels (1,470 KB)
    > without any apparentt loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    >
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) If I were to also resize the picture by half or so:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Save as 100% JPEG Quality
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 634 x 845 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > without any apparent loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > However, I get down to the smallest size again by reducing JPG Quality:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Image->Resize->33% yields 634 x 845 pixels (59 KB)
    > Using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 5. Let's take a look at some of the things we've learned so far:
    >
    > Note: Simply lowering the resolution did not gain me anything
    > (59 KB vs 59 KB)
    > by running the same steps w/o reducing the DPI.
    >
    > a) The major factor seems to be the QUALITY SETTING.
    >
    > For example, if I merely save the ORIGINAL picture at 50% Quality:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 1920 x 2560 (347 KB) at 50%
    >
    > b) The next major factor seems to be the SIZE:
    >
    > For example, if I merely reduce the size by half twice (i.e., 1/4):
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (262 KB) at 95%
    >
    > c) Yet, I can reduce the kbytes to well below a hundred doing both:
    > Yet, if I perform both size reduction by half twice (i.e., to 1/4):
    > And, if I save with a QUALITY SETTING of 50%:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (36 KB) at 50%
    >
    > Note: The quality of this photo was a bit poor; so strive for >60 KB.
    >
    > Reduce by 1/2 to 960 x 1280 & save at 50% = 113 KB with good quality.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 6. One other method to try is the Windows XP Send TO Mail Recipient:
    >
    > a) Right click in Windows XP on any photo file & select:
    > Send To->Mail Recipient->(o)Make all my pictures smaller
    > (o)Medium (fits in a 800 by 600 window)
    > [OK]
    >
    > b) For Netscape 7.x, this puts the file in c:\temp\moz_mapi\fname.jpg
    > with (decent) atributes of: 450 x 600 @ 300 DPI = 57 KB
    >
    > c) Note: Settings of "(o)Small (fits in a 640 by 480 window)" resulted
    > in a (blurry) picture of 360 x 480 @ 300 DPI = 39 KB
    >
    > Better to use the MEDIUM size.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Does anyone know why DPI settings did NOT change file sizes by much?
    > Does anyone have a BETTER FREE EASY method for shrinking photos for email?
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    FK, Sep 1, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Eunice Santorini

    Guest

    In rec.photo.digital Eunice Santorini <> wrote:
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.


    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).


    Why not just set your camera to a smaller resolution for photos
    that you only intend to email or share on a web site?
    , Sep 1, 2003
    #3
  4. Eunice Santorini

    HRosita Guest

    Hi,

    If you use a Windows base PC use Irfanview free from
    www.irfanview.com

    Uses excellent compression and has easy to choose preset sizes.
    Rosita
    HRosita, Sep 1, 2003
    #4
  5. Eunice Santorini

    Posie Guest

    Eunice,
    If your photos are being taken to email only change the resolution before
    shooting them, check your manual or the manufactures web site for help.

    If you might be printing them and want to keep the resolution high, use a
    program like Photoshop or picture it to change the size of resolution. I
    believe the software that came with your camera should have the ability to
    change the size for emailing.

    Good luck! To see my website pictures visit the link below.
    Posie

    --
    www.photoartbyposie.com
    Photographic art over the internet!
    Posie, Sep 1, 2003
    #5
  6. Eunice Santorini

    Frankhartx Guest

    >From: (Eunice Santorini)

    >I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.


    First get youself a decent editing program--Paint Shop Pro offers the most bang
    for the buck and you can download a free trial from jasc.com
    Using the editor make a copy and resize the copy to about 6x4 inches, That's
    it, simple as pie. You might want to make a folder for all your copies so you
    know where to find them when you want to email them or post on the web. How
    simple can you get! You get to keep your originals in case you might want to
    make prints and you have copies fro transmission. You can have your cake and
    eat it too!
    Frankhartx, Sep 1, 2003
    #6
  7. Eunice Santorini

    Tim Glover Guest

    This is a quick and easy method using Windows XP. (not sure if it works
    with Win 9.x)

    While viewing your picture files in Window Explorer, right click the picture
    file name, select "send to" then "mail recipient" Another window will open
    which asks if you want to reduce the size of the picture file suitable for
    emailing.


    "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >
    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).
    >
    > Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    > is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    > are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...
    >
    > WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?
    >
    > Below is my best attempt at deciphering the algorithm and the Windows
    > tools to use (free is best as we are NOT professionals).
    >
    > PLEASE critique this note below so that we all benefit from your

    knowledge.
    >
    > Let me know where I am wrong. Please give suggestions as to how to improve
    > the algorithm proposed below. All I want is the best free and easy method
    > to shrink photos to, say 50 KB or so, keeping the best possible picture.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eunice
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Tentative conclusions (based on a two-hour test as shown below):
    > A. Using JP2 allowed the SIMPLEST reductions to size; but was

    incompatible.
    > Reducing RESOLUTION (DPI or Pixels per inch) had little affect.
    > Reducing JPG QUALITY (from 100% to, say, 50%) has the largest affect.
    >
    > B. Quartering the size & halving the quality produced VERY SMALL SIZED

    JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 480 x 640 pixels ( 36 KB)
    >
    > C. Halving the size & quartering the quality produced VERY USABLE JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 960 x 1280 pixels ( 68 KB)
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 1. One way to shrink photos for sending in email is to use JPEG 2000

    format:
    >
    > a) First download the free IrfanView v3.80 photo editor/viewer:
    > http://www.irfanview.com
    >
    > b) Then, at the same site, download all the plugins, including the:
    > LuraTech Lurawave .jp2 JPEG 2000 Plug-in
    > (Register that plugin if you plan on resizing photos larger than

    640x480.)
    >
    > c) When you save as a JP2 file, you can compress to any desired size,

    e.g.,
    > 10 x 1024 = 10240 bytes 20 x 1024 = 20480 bytes
    > 30 x 1024 = 30720 bytes 40 x 1024 = 40960 bytes
    > 50 x 1024 = 51200 bytes 60 x 1024 = 61440 bytes
    > 70 x 1024 = 71680 bytes 80 x 1024 = 81920 bytes
    > 90 x 1024 = 92160 bytes 100 x 1024 = 102400 bytes
    >
    > Note: I've found 100x to be best; but 70x is acceptable for emailing.
    >
    > These JP2 photos are VERY GOOD (even at this small size of 70 KB)!
    >
    > However, the biggest problem with the JP2 format is folks might not have
    > a viewer (IrfanView views them just fine but Netscape 7.x does not) and
    > the plugin is not free (so we need a better free easy method than JP2).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 2. Another way to shrink photos is to use IrfanView on JPG files alone:
    >
    > a) First, resize the original JPG photo
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    >
    > Still, that's too large to email normally.
    >
    > b) One way to further shrink this is to reduce the JPEG Save Quality
    > to, say, 50%.
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 58 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 50%.
    > This gave acceptable results, it seemed.
    >
    > c) Another way I could have shrunk this was to further reduce pixels:
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Then, to reduce further, press the "Half" button (as needed).
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > to (by pressing "Half"): 320 x 427 pixels ( 124 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    > But, overall, I didn't like the quality of these results.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 3. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESIZE:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Resize the picture in LView (which is more of an editor than

    IrfanView):
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) Again, when I lower the JPG quality factor, I get appreciable

    reduction:
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 59 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 4. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESOLUTION:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Change resolution in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    >
    > Image->Resolution->From: 300 pixels per inch (dpi)
    > To: 72 pixels per inch (dpi)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 1920 x 2560 pixels (1,470 KB)
    > without any apparentt loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    >
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) If I were to also resize the picture by half or so:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Save as 100% JPEG Quality
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 634 x 845 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > without any apparent loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > However, I get down to the smallest size again by reducing JPG Quality:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Image->Resize->33% yields 634 x 845 pixels (59 KB)
    > Using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 5. Let's take a look at some of the things we've learned so far:
    >
    > Note: Simply lowering the resolution did not gain me anything
    > (59 KB vs 59 KB)
    > by running the same steps w/o reducing the DPI.
    >
    > a) The major factor seems to be the QUALITY SETTING.
    >
    > For example, if I merely save the ORIGINAL picture at 50% Quality:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 1920 x 2560 (347 KB) at 50%
    >
    > b) The next major factor seems to be the SIZE:
    >
    > For example, if I merely reduce the size by half twice (i.e., 1/4):
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (262 KB) at 95%
    >
    > c) Yet, I can reduce the kbytes to well below a hundred doing both:
    > Yet, if I perform both size reduction by half twice (i.e., to 1/4):
    > And, if I save with a QUALITY SETTING of 50%:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (36 KB) at 50%
    >
    > Note: The quality of this photo was a bit poor; so strive for >60 KB.
    >
    > Reduce by 1/2 to 960 x 1280 & save at 50% = 113 KB with good quality.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 6. One other method to try is the Windows XP Send TO Mail Recipient:
    >
    > a) Right click in Windows XP on any photo file & select:
    > Send To->Mail Recipient->(o)Make all my pictures smaller
    > (o)Medium (fits in a 800 by 600 window)
    > [OK]
    >
    > b) For Netscape 7.x, this puts the file in c:\temp\moz_mapi\fname.jpg
    > with (decent) atributes of: 450 x 600 @ 300 DPI = 57 KB
    >
    > c) Note: Settings of "(o)Small (fits in a 640 by 480 window)" resulted
    > in a (blurry) picture of 360 x 480 @ 300 DPI = 39 KB
    >
    > Better to use the MEDIUM size.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Does anyone know why DPI settings did NOT change file sizes by much?
    > Does anyone have a BETTER FREE EASY method for shrinking photos for email?
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    Tim Glover, Sep 1, 2003
    #7
  8. > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.

    I use PhotoShop. Select Save to Web and reduce the longest dimension
    to 640 (and let the other go wherever it wants to stay proportional).
    Randall Ainsworth, Sep 1, 2003
    #8
  9. [Note: F'up2 cut down --- should have been done by OP, but wasn't.]

    In comp.graphics.algorithms Eunice Santorini <> wrote:
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.


    Neither does anybody else. There hardly ever is a single, universally
    agreeable "best" way to do anything, and image compression is
    definitely not an exception from that rule.

    Reducing the resolution to something that actually fits on a computer
    screen (i.e. less than about 1 MegaPixels) is a necessity anyway, so
    there's nothing to be lost in doing that as a first step. The
    trade-off between further resolution reduction and JPEG quality
    reduction is not something that can be judged automatically --- it
    depends on the content of the images, too.


    --
    Hans-Bernhard Broeker (-aachen.de)
    Even if all the snow were burnt, ashes would remain.
    Hans-Bernhard Broeker, Sep 1, 2003
    #9
  10. Eunice Santorini

    Mike Graham Guest

    In article <bivdjm$jmi$>, wrote:

    > Why not just set your camera to a smaller resolution for photos
    > that you only intend to email or share on a web site?


    What if you get a great shot that you decide to print and frame? Hard
    drive space is cheap. I've got about 300 gigabytes on this system. Lots of
    room for photographs. The real bottleneck is the card in the camera.

    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    Mike Graham, Sep 1, 2003
    #10
  11. Eunice Santorini

    SND Guest

    "Tim Glover" <> wrote in
    news:wlH4b.17280$:

    > This is a quick and easy method using Windows XP. (not sure if it
    > works with Win 9.x)
    >
    > While viewing your picture files in Window Explorer, right click the
    > picture file name, select "send to" then "mail recipient" Another
    > window will open which asks if you want to reduce the size of the
    > picture file suitable for emailing.
    >
    >
    > "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the
    >> mail.


    Using the above XP suggestion works for me. I used to use Irfanview's
    batch conversion feature after creating a new folder with the photos in
    it to convert (settings: jpeg, 80% quality, 72 dpi, preserve aspect
    ratio, width set at 640, let Irfanview calculate height). But that's just
    not worth the aggravation. Simply, right click on the photos you want to
    e-mail in XP, choose a size, and the jpegs are in your e-mail and ready
    to send. I wish that I had known of this feature earlier.


    --
    SND
    SND, Sep 1, 2003
    #11
  12. Eunice Santorini

    Patrick L. Guest

    There are numerous apps to compress files. One free one I know of is called
    "JPEG Sizer", just do a search for it.

    Or try www.nonags.com and download any one of their free "compression
    utilities", which, I believe, is what they are called.


    Patrick L.




    "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >
    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).
    >
    > Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    > is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    > are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...
    >
    > WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?
    >
    > Below is my best attempt at deciphering the algorithm and the Windows
    > tools to use (free is best as we are NOT professionals).
    >
    > PLEASE critique this note below so that we all benefit from your

    knowledge.
    >
    > Let me know where I am wrong. Please give suggestions as to how to improve
    > the algorithm proposed below. All I want is the best free and easy method
    > to shrink photos to, say 50 KB or so, keeping the best possible picture.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eunice
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Tentative conclusions (based on a two-hour test as shown below):
    > A. Using JP2 allowed the SIMPLEST reductions to size; but was

    incompatible.
    > Reducing RESOLUTION (DPI or Pixels per inch) had little affect.
    > Reducing JPG QUALITY (from 100% to, say, 50%) has the largest affect.
    >
    > B. Quartering the size & halving the quality produced VERY SMALL SIZED

    JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 480 x 640 pixels ( 36 KB)
    >
    > C. Halving the size & quartering the quality produced VERY USABLE JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 960 x 1280 pixels ( 68 KB)
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 1. One way to shrink photos for sending in email is to use JPEG 2000

    format:
    >
    > a) First download the free IrfanView v3.80 photo editor/viewer:
    > http://www.irfanview.com
    >
    > b) Then, at the same site, download all the plugins, including the:
    > LuraTech Lurawave .jp2 JPEG 2000 Plug-in
    > (Register that plugin if you plan on resizing photos larger than

    640x480.)
    >
    > c) When you save as a JP2 file, you can compress to any desired size,

    e.g.,
    > 10 x 1024 = 10240 bytes 20 x 1024 = 20480 bytes
    > 30 x 1024 = 30720 bytes 40 x 1024 = 40960 bytes
    > 50 x 1024 = 51200 bytes 60 x 1024 = 61440 bytes
    > 70 x 1024 = 71680 bytes 80 x 1024 = 81920 bytes
    > 90 x 1024 = 92160 bytes 100 x 1024 = 102400 bytes
    >
    > Note: I've found 100x to be best; but 70x is acceptable for emailing.
    >
    > These JP2 photos are VERY GOOD (even at this small size of 70 KB)!
    >
    > However, the biggest problem with the JP2 format is folks might not have
    > a viewer (IrfanView views them just fine but Netscape 7.x does not) and
    > the plugin is not free (so we need a better free easy method than JP2).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 2. Another way to shrink photos is to use IrfanView on JPG files alone:
    >
    > a) First, resize the original JPG photo
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    >
    > Still, that's too large to email normally.
    >
    > b) One way to further shrink this is to reduce the JPEG Save Quality
    > to, say, 50%.
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 58 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 50%.
    > This gave acceptable results, it seemed.
    >
    > c) Another way I could have shrunk this was to further reduce pixels:
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212

    KB)
    > Then, to reduce further, press the "Half" button (as needed).
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > to (by pressing "Half"): 320 x 427 pixels ( 124 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    > But, overall, I didn't like the quality of these results.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 3. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESIZE:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Resize the picture in LView (which is more of an editor than

    IrfanView):
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) Again, when I lower the JPG quality factor, I get appreciable

    reduction:
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 59 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 4. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESOLUTION:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, &

    Resolution.
    >
    > b) Change resolution in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    >
    > Image->Resolution->From: 300 pixels per inch (dpi)
    > To: 72 pixels per inch (dpi)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 1920 x 2560 pixels (1,470 KB)
    > without any apparentt loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    >
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) If I were to also resize the picture by half or so:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Save as 100% JPEG Quality
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 634 x 845 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > without any apparent loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > However, I get down to the smallest size again by reducing JPG Quality:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Image->Resize->33% yields 634 x 845 pixels (59 KB)
    > Using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 5. Let's take a look at some of the things we've learned so far:
    >
    > Note: Simply lowering the resolution did not gain me anything
    > (59 KB vs 59 KB)
    > by running the same steps w/o reducing the DPI.
    >
    > a) The major factor seems to be the QUALITY SETTING.
    >
    > For example, if I merely save the ORIGINAL picture at 50% Quality:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 1920 x 2560 (347 KB) at 50%
    >
    > b) The next major factor seems to be the SIZE:
    >
    > For example, if I merely reduce the size by half twice (i.e., 1/4):
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (262 KB) at 95%
    >
    > c) Yet, I can reduce the kbytes to well below a hundred doing both:
    > Yet, if I perform both size reduction by half twice (i.e., to 1/4):
    > And, if I save with a QUALITY SETTING of 50%:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (36 KB) at 50%
    >
    > Note: The quality of this photo was a bit poor; so strive for >60 KB.
    >
    > Reduce by 1/2 to 960 x 1280 & save at 50% = 113 KB with good quality.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > 6. One other method to try is the Windows XP Send TO Mail Recipient:
    >
    > a) Right click in Windows XP on any photo file & select:
    > Send To->Mail Recipient->(o)Make all my pictures smaller
    > (o)Medium (fits in a 800 by 600 window)
    > [OK]
    >
    > b) For Netscape 7.x, this puts the file in c:\temp\moz_mapi\fname.jpg
    > with (decent) atributes of: 450 x 600 @ 300 DPI = 57 KB
    >
    > c) Note: Settings of "(o)Small (fits in a 640 by 480 window)" resulted
    > in a (blurry) picture of 360 x 480 @ 300 DPI = 39 KB
    >
    > Better to use the MEDIUM size.
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    > Does anyone know why DPI settings did NOT change file sizes by much?
    > Does anyone have a BETTER FREE EASY method for shrinking photos for email?
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --
    Patrick L., Sep 1, 2003
    #12
  13. Eunice Santorini

    Peter Gordon Guest

    www.seanet.com/~pgm/jpegsizer.htm
    lets you specify the width & height in
    pixels and set the file size. It then
    works out the JPEG compression factor requred
    to achieve this.

    It's a greay little utility
    Peter Gordon, Sep 1, 2003
    #13
  14. Eunice Santorini

    carl Guest

    Step 1 - Buy PhotoShop Elements. It costs $99 (or less sometimes) and
    is an amazing photo editing program for the price. A must have.
    After all, you spent $500+ on your camera, another $99 to make your
    pictures look great is cheap.

    Step 2 - Open photo in Elements.

    Step 3 - Go to Image Size menu, change dpi to 72 or 90 (depending on
    whether you want to cater to Mac-heads or PC-ers), then change
    height/width to around 500 pixels.

    Step 4 - Save as a JPG at quality 4.

    This should give you a file fine for viewing on a screen (4x6 inches
    or so) with a size of about 50k.


    (Eunice Santorini) wrote in message news:<>...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >
    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).
    >
    > Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    > is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    > are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...
    >
    > WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?
    >
    > Below is my best attempt at deciphering the algorithm and the Windows
    > tools to use (free is best as we are NOT professionals).
    >
    > PLEASE critique this note below so that we all benefit from your knowledge.
    >
    > Let me know where I am wrong. Please give suggestions as to how to improve
    > the algorithm proposed below. All I want is the best free and easy method
    > to shrink photos to, say 50 KB or so, keeping the best possible picture.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Eunice
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Tentative conclusions (based on a two-hour test as shown below):
    > A. Using JP2 allowed the SIMPLEST reductions to size; but was incompatible.
    > Reducing RESOLUTION (DPI or Pixels per inch) had little affect.
    > Reducing JPG QUALITY (from 100% to, say, 50%) has the largest affect.
    >
    > B. Quartering the size & halving the quality produced VERY SMALL SIZED JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 480 x 640 pixels ( 36 KB)
    >
    > C. Halving the size & quartering the quality produced VERY USABLE JPGs:
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > To: 960 x 1280 pixels ( 68 KB)
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 1. One way to shrink photos for sending in email is to use JPEG 2000 format:
    >
    > a) First download the free IrfanView v3.80 photo editor/viewer:
    > http://www.irfanview.com
    >
    > b) Then, at the same site, download all the plugins, including the:
    > LuraTech Lurawave .jp2 JPEG 2000 Plug-in
    > (Register that plugin if you plan on resizing photos larger than 640x480.)
    >
    > c) When you save as a JP2 file, you can compress to any desired size, e.g.,
    > 10 x 1024 = 10240 bytes 20 x 1024 = 20480 bytes
    > 30 x 1024 = 30720 bytes 40 x 1024 = 40960 bytes
    > 50 x 1024 = 51200 bytes 60 x 1024 = 61440 bytes
    > 70 x 1024 = 71680 bytes 80 x 1024 = 81920 bytes
    > 90 x 1024 = 92160 bytes 100 x 1024 = 102400 bytes
    >
    > Note: I've found 100x to be best; but 70x is acceptable for emailing.
    >
    > These JP2 photos are VERY GOOD (even at this small size of 70 KB)!
    >
    > However, the biggest problem with the JP2 format is folks might not have
    > a viewer (IrfanView views them just fine but Netscape 7.x does not) and
    > the plugin is not free (so we need a better free easy method than JP2).
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 2. Another way to shrink photos is to use IrfanView on JPG files alone:
    >
    > a) First, resize the original JPG photo
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212 KB)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    >
    > Still, that's too large to email normally.
    >
    > b) One way to further shrink this is to reduce the JPEG Save Quality
    > to, say, 50%.
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 58 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 50%.
    > This gave acceptable results, it seemed.
    >
    > c) Another way I could have shrunk this was to further reduce pixels:
    > Image->Resize/Resample->Current size = 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > Image->Resize/Resample->New size = 640 x 480 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > Then, to reduce further, press the "Half" button (as needed).
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > to: 640 x 853 pixels ( 443 KB)
    > to (by pressing "Half"): 320 x 427 pixels ( 124 KB)
    > using an IrfanView default JPEG Save Quality of 100%.
    > But, overall, I didn't like the quality of these results.
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 3. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESIZE:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, & Resolution.
    >
    > b) Resize the picture in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) Again, when I lower the JPG quality factor, I get appreciable reduction:
    > Image->Resize->33% of 1920 = 633.6 pixels width
    > 33% of 2560 = 844.8 pixels height
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 633.6 x 844.8 pixels ( 59 KB)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch).
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 4. Another way to shrink photos for emailing is to use LView RESOLUTION:
    >
    > a) First download the shareware LView Pro (I used 2002 1st Quarter) from:
    > http://www.lview.com
    >
    > Note: LView Pro provides the functions: Resize, Redimension, & Resolution.
    >
    > b) Change resolution in LView (which is more of an editor than IrfanView):
    >
    > Image->Resolution->From: 300 pixels per inch (dpi)
    > To: 72 pixels per inch (dpi)
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 1920 x 2560 pixels (1,470 KB)
    > without any apparentt loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    >
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > c) If I were to also resize the picture by half or so:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Save as 100% JPEG Quality
    >
    > This reduced the file from 1920 x 2560 pixels (3,212 KB)
    > (at an Image Resolution of 300.000 pixels per inch)
    > to: 634 x 845 pixels ( 224 KB)
    > without any apparent loss of clarity (the screen is 72dpi)
    > using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 95%
    > (resulting in an Image Resolution of 72 pixels per inch).
    >
    > However, I get down to the smallest size again by reducing JPG Quality:
    > Image->Resolution->72 pixels per inch
    > Image->Resize->33% yields 634 x 845 pixels (59 KB)
    > Using an LView Pro default JPEG Compress Quality Factor of 50%
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 5. Let's take a look at some of the things we've learned so far:
    >
    > Note: Simply lowering the resolution did not gain me anything
    > (59 KB vs 59 KB)
    > by running the same steps w/o reducing the DPI.
    >
    > a) The major factor seems to be the QUALITY SETTING.
    >
    > For example, if I merely save the ORIGINAL picture at 50% Quality:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 1920 x 2560 (347 KB) at 50%
    >
    > b) The next major factor seems to be the SIZE:
    >
    > For example, if I merely reduce the size by half twice (i.e., 1/4):
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (262 KB) at 95%
    >
    > c) Yet, I can reduce the kbytes to well below a hundred doing both:
    > Yet, if I perform both size reduction by half twice (i.e., to 1/4):
    > And, if I save with a QUALITY SETTING of 50%:
    > I get a picture of the following statistics:
    > 480 x 640 (36 KB) at 50%
    >
    > Note: The quality of this photo was a bit poor; so strive for >60 KB.
    >
    > Reduce by 1/2 to 960 x 1280 & save at 50% = 113 KB with good quality.
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > 6. One other method to try is the Windows XP Send TO Mail Recipient:
    >
    > a) Right click in Windows XP on any photo file & select:
    > Send To->Mail Recipient->(o)Make all my pictures smaller
    > (o)Medium (fits in a 800 by 600 window)
    > [OK]
    >
    > b) For Netscape 7.x, this puts the file in c:\temp\moz_mapi\fname.jpg
    > with (decent) atributes of: 450 x 600 @ 300 DPI = 57 KB
    >
    > c) Note: Settings of "(o)Small (fits in a 640 by 480 window)" resulted
    > in a (blurry) picture of 360 x 480 @ 300 DPI = 39 KB
    >
    > Better to use the MEDIUM size.
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Does anyone know why DPI settings did NOT change file sizes by much?
    > Does anyone have a BETTER FREE EASY method for shrinking photos for email?
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    carl, Sep 1, 2003
    #14
  15. Eunice Santorini

    Frank ess Guest

    "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >


    I may have understood wrong, but it seems to me if the purpose for ALL your
    pictures is casual viewing by friends at the other end of an email link, you
    should control file- and image-size at the earliest point in the process. If
    you expect to print and exhibit some, I'd guess you'll know which before you
    make the exposures, and can adjust the camera accordingly.

    I'm kind of a street-shooter and a slave to recipes, rather than menus, so I
    treat all exposures pretty much the same: take them at an acceptably high
    resolution ('fine-full' in my Nikon CP5700) and mess with the other
    variables later.

    A while back (time flies, eh?) I made a bunch of shots at a colorful,
    activity-filled venue, Laguna Seca raceway during the Monterey Historics
    annual extravaganza. Overwhelmed by the opportunities, brought home 800+
    photos on CF cards. Still post-processing them, maybe a little more than
    halfway through.

    If I had taken them for posting on FotoTime (that's where they are going, so
    far) I'd have done the quality-size thing in the camera, and be done by now.
    Romantic that I am, I hope some of the originals will be of enough
    attraction and use that some 8x10s and even 11x14s might eventually be
    desirable. That's why I'm still in the midst of a month's drudgery (OK,
    there is *some* pleasure to be had during the post-processing. Really).


    So, here's the Photoshop recipe for what I do before uploading images that
    are 760x??? (big enough to reward something more than a cursory view) and
    30-70K in size (depending on content):

    Minimal crop.

    Image - Adjustments - Curves: usually not much need; when there is, very
    minor s-curve

    Image - Mode - Lab Color - LIghtness: one dose of Unsharp Mask at 50% -
    1.3 - 4 for ordinary photos, two doses for phots that are a little
    out-of-focus

    Image - Mode - RGB Color

    Actions: I have recorded an action that reduces the image long-dimension
    size (Image - Image size) by 5%, five times (95% - 95% - 95% - 95% - 95%),
    and another that plays the first action five times. From the original
    2560x1920 image, hitting the [(95%x5) x 5] action once and the 95%x5 action
    once, the photo is usually a little smaller than the 760x I am looking for.
    I choose a version in the History list that is one step larger than the
    760x. Depending on the photo, I might put one more dose of the USM filter on
    it, then

    Image - Image Size - (Long Dimension) enter the final size, usually 760, and
    OK

    Save for Web - JPEG - 30 Quality - Save. Choose a directory as the target,
    and a name for the file - Save.

    And Done. I have looked at a lot of JPEG Quality settings, and 30 seems to
    be the one that is a good compromise between quality of image viewed, and
    size of file required.

    My process is one compromise after another. If I never cropped, it could
    almost all be performed by recorded actions. If I always used the same
    values in Curves, same. The USM and shrink steps are each a compromise that
    has required little adjustment.

    Of course I'm not an expert in either photography or Photoshop. I realize my
    physical and aesthetic eyes are inferior to many, and I'd expect and hope
    for the constructive criticism and help of genuine experts in making all
    this easier and quicker for me.

    See a representative sample of the project's images posted at
    http://www.fototime.com/inv/50E6FCCB5F70955


    In the meantime, it is really fun, even-mostly-the drudgery.


    Frank ess
    Frank ess, Sep 1, 2003
    #15
  16. Eunice Santorini

    Dan R Guest

    Ifran View Quick/Easy/Free

    IfranView -- I nave tried many others., this is quick and easy and uses
    little resources. Did I say quick? It is, loads fast, writes fast. I have
    used this little utility for years and love it for many tasks. Not to
    replace Photoshop or other programs I use however, just as another tool.
    Give it a look.. I think you will like it...

    http://www.irfanview.com/

    Dan R.



    "Eunice Santorini" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.
    >
    > My digital camera takes shots at 5 Megapixels, which in 'fine' mode,
    > typically produces photographs around 3,000 KB in size (which is two
    > orders of magnitude too large for proper emailing (i.e., < 100 KB).
    >
    > Assuming the photo is NOT going to be printed, and assuming the photo
    > is simply to be elecrtonically viewed by family members (some of whom
    > are on 56K bit/sec modems) ...
    >
    > WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO SHRINK these large photos for emailing?
    >

    <snip>
    Dan R, Sep 1, 2003
    #16
  17. Eunice Santorini

    Ric Trexell Guest

    Re: Ifran View Quick/Easy/Free

    "Dan R" > IfranView -- I nave tried many others., this is quick and easy and
    uses
    > little resources.
    > Give it a look.. I think you will like it...
    >
    > http://www.irfanview.com/
    >
    > Dan R.
    > **********************************************************

    Dan: Irfanview is a great program but I also like XnView. I use Xnview
    for reducing photos. I think it is faster than Irfanview, perhaps not in
    the actual reducing but in the way you do it. I like Irfanview better for
    showing slide shows though. These two programs should be included with
    Windows as they are better than the Kodak Imaging that is. Ric in
    Wisconsin.
    Ric Trexell, Sep 2, 2003
    #17
  18. "Tim Glover" <> wrote:

    >This is a quick and easy method using Windows XP. (not sure if it works
    >with Win 9.x)
    >
    >While viewing your picture files in Window Explorer, right click the picture
    >file name, select "send to" then "mail recipient" Another window will open
    >which asks if you want to reduce the size of the picture file suitable for
    >emailing.


    Tim,

    thanks a lot for this hint! That's incredibly easy and
    convenient! I hadn't found this function without your help.

    Just tested it and found that it uses the vertical pixels only.
    For example, when I choose 800 x 600 but have a portrait
    orientation photo, it becomes 450 x 600. No problem and makes
    sense to have them all the same height, but we need to know.

    Hans-Georg

    --
    No mail, please.
    Hans-Georg Michna, Sep 2, 2003
    #18
  19. Eunice Santorini

    Slingblade Guest

    On 1 Sep 2003 03:21:31 -0700, (Eunice Santorini)
    wrote:

    >I do NOT know how best to 'shrink' photographs for sending in the mail.


    I didn't bother to read all that stuff you posted after this line,
    because at a glance, it looked like way too much information. Your
    software that allows you to "save" photographs should have some kind
    of "properties" or "setup" or such that allows you to change the
    resolution or file size/types.

    But if not, many different kinds of photo viewers/editors allow this.
    Some of them, by default will drastically reduce the size of a scanned
    image if you "resave" the image (preferably to a new filename, since
    you may need the original in it's original format in the future.

    In any case...

    ..JPG format is the way to go...period!

    Most scanners and I'm sure cameras may also generally use the .TIF
    format for initial savefiles. .TIF's are one of the largest graphic
    formats there are...but they're also one of the sharpest.

    I would imagine Photoshop or similar photo manipulation programs can
    probably change image size.

    I used to use an old DOS program called GDS to change the size of my
    scans to something more managable (and mailable). I've had other
    pieces of DOS and Windows software that would do the job too...but GDS
    used to do it the best. I could take a scan that was 1.5mb in size
    and reduce it to a couple hundred kilobytes, or sometimes less. I
    could event take pictures I'd downloaded from other places and reduce
    their sizes as well, simply by resaving the files.
    Slingblade, Sep 2, 2003
    #19
  20. Eunice Santorini

    Dan R Guest

    Re: Ifran View Quick/Easy/Free

    I just looked at XnView. I like it... better at batch conversion and it does
    seem quick!! Thanks for the suggestion. I have added XnView to my arsenal!
    Now only to decide which Digicam to buy ... <<heavy sigh>>

    I love when Newsgroups work the way they are supposed to! Thanks again Ric.

    Dan R. (in Michigan)




    "Ric Trexell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Dan R" > IfranView -- I nave tried many others., this is quick and easy

    and
    > uses
    > > little resources.
    > > Give it a look.. I think you will like it...
    > >
    > > http://www.irfanview.com/
    > >
    > > Dan R.
    > > **********************************************************

    > Dan: Irfanview is a great program but I also like XnView. I use

    Xnview
    > for reducing photos. I think it is faster than Irfanview, perhaps not in
    > the actual reducing but in the way you do it. I like Irfanview better for
    > showing slide shows though. These two programs should be included with
    > Windows as they are better than the Kodak Imaging that is. Ric in
    > Wisconsin.
    >
    >
    Dan R, Sep 2, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    11
    Views:
    4,649
    escapeartist69
    Sep 21, 2004
  2. Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,274
    Owl Jolson
    Sep 10, 2004
  3. Marful
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    871
  4. Replies:
    4
    Views:
    647
    Jürgen Exner
    Jan 30, 2008
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    841
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page