How am I connected?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Café Publico, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. There's probably a perfectly rational explanation for this, but at the
    moment I'm stumped:

    In the control panel's "network connections", 2 connections are shown:
    (1) "Broadband --- sbcglobal, disconnected, firewalled, WAN Miniport (PPOE)"
    --- (the above has a check mark indicating default connection)

    and

    (2) "LAN or High Speed Internet --- local area connection, connected,
    firewalled, Intel (R) PRO/100 VE, Network Connection, IP address
    xx.xxx.xxx.xxx, subnet mask xxx.xxx.xxx.x assigned by DHCP"

    I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no router) which
    is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and off once a day.

    Questions: Should I be using the "Broadband" connection instead of the LAN?
    How am I even connecting since the disconnected "Broadband" is shown as
    default?

    I'm not experiencing any problems with my connections, but merely curious to
    find out why they apear to work when set up this way.

    Thanks for any info or comments . . .
     
    Café Publico, Sep 21, 2010
    #1
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  2. Café Publico

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 11:55:25 -0700, Café Publico wrote:

    > There's probably a perfectly rational explanation for this, but at the
    > moment I'm stumped:
    >
    > In the control panel's "network connections", 2 connections are shown:
    > (1) "Broadband --- sbcglobal, disconnected, firewalled, WAN Miniport
    > (PPOE)"
    > --- (the above has a check mark indicating default connection)


    AT&T's PPPoE miniport for authentication on their network. I've never used
    one of these, always let the router authenticate PPPoE.

    > and
    >
    > (2) "LAN or High Speed Internet --- local area connection, connected,
    > firewalled, Intel (R) PRO/100 VE, Network Connection, IP address
    > xx.xxx.xxx.xxx, subnet mask xxx.xxx.xxx.x assigned by DHCP"


    The network you are connected to

    > I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    > computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no router)
    > which is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and off once a
    > day.
    >
    > Questions: Should I be using the "Broadband" connection instead of the
    > LAN? How am I even connecting since the disconnected "Broadband" is
    > shown as default?
    >
    > I'm not experiencing any problems with my connections, but merely
    > curious to find out why they apear to work when set up this way.
    >
    > Thanks for any info or comments . . .



    I'm assuming, maybe incorrectly that the WAN miniport only connects to a
    PPPoE server in AT&T's network cloud to log you on to their network.

    As far as the #2 connection, you are always connected to AT&T and can
    access their servers without the PPPoE login. But you cannot access
    anything outside AT&T's cloud.


    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 21, 2010
    #2
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  3. Café Publico

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 19:32:06 +0000, Meat Plow wrote:

    > On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 11:55:25 -0700, Café Publico wrote:
    >
    >> There's probably a perfectly rational explanation for this, but at the
    >> moment I'm stumped:
    >>
    >> In the control panel's "network connections", 2 connections are shown:
    >> (1) "Broadband --- sbcglobal, disconnected, firewalled, WAN Miniport
    >> (PPOE)"
    >> --- (the above has a check mark indicating default connection)

    >
    > AT&T's PPPoE miniport for authentication on their network. I've never
    > used one of these, always let the router authenticate PPPoE.
    >
    >> and
    >>
    >> (2) "LAN or High Speed Internet --- local area connection, connected,
    >> firewalled, Intel (R) PRO/100 VE, Network Connection, IP address
    >> xx.xxx.xxx.xxx, subnet mask xxx.xxx.xxx.x assigned by DHCP"

    >
    > The network you are connected to
    >
    >> I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    >> computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no router)
    >> which is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and off once a
    >> day.
    >>
    >> Questions: Should I be using the "Broadband" connection instead of the
    >> LAN? How am I even connecting since the disconnected "Broadband" is
    >> shown as default?
    >>
    >> I'm not experiencing any problems with my connections, but merely
    >> curious to find out why they apear to work when set up this way.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any info or comments . . .

    >
    >
    > I'm assuming, maybe incorrectly that the WAN miniport only connects to a
    > PPPoE server in AT&T's network cloud to log you on to their network.


    Forgot: And disconnects when not logged in or disconnects after you log
    in or both.

    > As far as the #2 connection, you are always connected to AT&T and can
    > access their servers without the PPPoE login. But you cannot access
    > anything outside AT&T's cloud.






    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 21, 2010
    #3
  4. Café Publico

    Mike Easter Guest

    Meat Plow wrote:
    >> Café Publico wrote:

    >
    >>> I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    >>> computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no router)
    >>> which is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and off once a
    >>> day.


    >> I'm assuming, maybe incorrectly that the WAN miniport only connects to a
    >> PPPoE server in AT&T's network cloud to log you on to their network.

    >
    > Forgot: And disconnects when not logged in or disconnects after you log
    > in or both.


    >> As far as the #2 connection, you are always connected to AT&T and can
    >> access their servers without the PPPoE login. But you cannot access
    >> anything outside AT&T's cloud.


    (I'm assuming) The OP's 'style' is to leave the DSL modem always on when
    he turns the computer off, so the modem/gateway keeps its IP address
    renewed. When he turns the computer on, the ethernet asks for and gets
    its IP from the modem. 'Invisible' pppoe.

    If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the network
    gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing or if that
    is silent in the background and he only can ever see the ethernet IP
    acquisition process.

    I've never had a DSL modem to watch doing its thing :)


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 21, 2010
    #4
  5. Café Publico

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 13:26:23 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:

    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >>> Café Publico wrote:

    >>
    >>>> I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    >>>> computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no
    >>>> router) which is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and
    >>>> off once a day.

    >
    >>> I'm assuming, maybe incorrectly that the WAN miniport only connects to
    >>> a PPPoE server in AT&T's network cloud to log you on to their network.

    >>
    >> Forgot: And disconnects when not logged in or disconnects after you log
    >> in or both.

    >
    >>> As far as the #2 connection, you are always connected to AT&T and can
    >>> access their servers without the PPPoE login. But you cannot access
    >>> anything outside AT&T's cloud.

    >
    > (I'm assuming) The OP's 'style' is to leave the DSL modem always on when
    > he turns the computer off, so the modem/gateway keeps its IP address
    > renewed. When he turns the computer on, the ethernet asks for and gets
    > its IP from the modem. 'Invisible' pppoe.
    >
    > If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    > the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the network
    > gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing or if that
    > is silent in the background and he only can ever see the ethernet IP
    > acquisition process.
    >
    > I've never had a DSL modem to watch doing its thing :)



    The WAN PPPoE software AT&T is run either at startup and logs the user in
    transparently or the user does it manually. The modem always has an IP
    address. However his LAN card gets an IP from an AT&T DHCP server after
    the PPPoE server has accepted the user's name and password. I had AT&T
    DSL from 2004 to 2008 and this is the way it was then. Maybe they've
    changed it now discarding the need to authenticate but rather decide who
    gets out of the cloud by MAC address like cable does.


    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 21, 2010
    #5
  6. "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >>> Café Publico wrote:

    >>
    >>>> I'm using XP Pro SP3, am not on any computer network with any other
    >>>> computer, and am subscribe to ATT DSL, have only one modem (no router)
    >>>> which is left on all the time, and turn the computer on and off once a
    >>>> day.

    >
    >>> I'm assuming, maybe incorrectly that the WAN miniport only connects to a
    >>> PPPoE server in AT&T's network cloud to log you on to their network.

    >>
    >> Forgot: And disconnects when not logged in or disconnects after you log
    >> in or both.

    >
    >>> As far as the #2 connection, you are always connected to AT&T and can
    >>> access their servers without the PPPoE login. But you cannot access
    >>> anything outside AT&T's cloud.

    >
    > (I'm assuming) The OP's 'style' is to leave the DSL modem always on when
    > he turns the computer off, so the modem/gateway keeps its IP address
    > renewed. When he turns the computer on, the ethernet asks for and gets its
    > IP from the modem. 'Invisible' pppoe.


    Actually, even though I keep the modem on, there's a new IP address every
    time the computer is turned on.
    >
    > If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off the
    > modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the network gizmo
    > and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing or if that is
    > silent in the background and he only can ever see the ethernet IP
    > acquisition process.


    And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?

    >
    > I've never had a DSL modem to watch doing its thing :)
    >
    >
    > --
    > Mike Easter
     
    Café Publico, Sep 21, 2010
    #6
  7. Café Publico

    Mike Easter Guest

    Café Publico wrote:
    > "Mike Easter"


    >> If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    >> the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the
    >> network gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing
    >> or if that is silent in the background and he only can ever see the
    >> ethernet IP acquisition process.

    >
    > And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?


    You never named the brand and modelno of your DSL modem. One example for
    some is http://192.168.1.1 but it is not universal.

    Do you have 2wire, Motorola, Westell or some other and which model?

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 21, 2010
    #7
  8. Café Publico

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:22:17 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:

    > Café Publico wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"

    >
    >>> If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    >>> the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the
    >>> network gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing
    >>> or if that is silent in the background and he only can ever see the
    >>> ethernet IP acquisition process.

    >>
    >> And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?

    >
    > You never named the brand and modelno of your DSL modem. One example for
    > some is http://192.168.1.1 but it is not universal.
    >
    > Do you have 2wire, Motorola, Westell or some other and which model?



    His should be 192.168.0.1



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 21, 2010
    #8
  9. "Mike Easter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Café Publico wrote:
    >> "Mike Easter"

    >
    >>> If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    >>> the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the network
    >>> gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing or if that
    >>> is silent in the background and he only can ever see the ethernet IP
    >>> acquisition process.

    >>
    >> And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?

    >
    > You never named the brand and modelno of your DSL modem. One example for
    > some is http://192.168.1.1 but it is not universal.
    >
    > Do you have 2wire, Motorola, Westell or some other and which model?


    It's a Siemens Speedstream 4100.

    perhaps it didn't get posted on your service:
    http://groups.google.com/group/24hoursupport.helpdesk/msg/51ff7f7adca80656?hl=en

    Thanks very much for helping me figure this out . .
     
    Café Publico, Sep 21, 2010
    #9
  10. Café Publico

    Mike Easter Guest

    Meat Plow wrote:
    > Mike Easter wrote:
    >> Café Publico wrote:
    >>> "Mike Easter"
    >>>> If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn off
    >>>> the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the
    >>>> network gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing
    >>>> or if that is silent in the background and he only can ever see the
    >>>> ethernet IP acquisition process.


    >>> And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?


    >> You never named the brand and modelno of your DSL modem. One example for
    >> some is http://192.168.1.1 but it is not universal.
    >>
    >> Do you have 2wire, Motorola, Westell or some other and which model?

    >
    >
    > His should be 192.168.0.1


    OK. Also some of them do it like 2wire: http://gateway.2wire.net.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 21, 2010
    #10
  11. Café Publico

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Tue, 21 Sep 2010 15:51:33 -0700, Mike Easter wrote:

    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >> Mike Easter wrote:
    >>> Café Publico wrote:
    >>>> "Mike Easter"
    >>>>> If he wanted to see the process unfold, he would have to also turn
    >>>>> off the modem and watch its lights and its webpage interface and the
    >>>>> network gizmo and see whether or not he can see the pppoe processing
    >>>>> or if that is silent in the background and he only can ever see the
    >>>>> ethernet IP acquisition process.

    >
    >>>> And where does one find the "webpage interface" for one's modem?

    >
    >>> You never named the brand and modelno of your DSL modem. One example
    >>> for some is http://192.168.1.1 but it is not universal.
    >>>
    >>> Do you have 2wire, Motorola, Westell or some other and which model?

    >>
    >>
    >> His should be 192.168.0.1

    >
    > OK. Also some of them do it like 2wire: http://gateway.2wire.net.



    Yeah I've had the Speedstream and the 2Wire router/modem. Still have
    them. The 2Wire was cool but wanted to impose too much security for me.
    It did keep logs on a lot of technical stuff modem-wise. When I started
    to get disconnects and re-trains when it rained and nobody had an answer
    I told AT&T to shove it and went back to cable.


    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 22, 2010
    #11
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