How about,(less than one season,) TV series?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tom McCafferty, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. I think, Timecop was one of them.
     
    Tom McCafferty, Oct 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Tom McCafferty <> wrote:

    > I think, Timecop was one of them.


    No, TIMECOP ran one season.

    The only way you could have a show that ran less than one season is if
    it didn't run at all.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tom McCafferty

    Mark Spatny Guest

    jayembee, says...
    > The only way you could have a show that ran less than one season is if
    > it didn't run at all.


    No, plenty of shows run less than one season. Many of the shows in the
    "one season" thread ran less than one full season. One season being a
    full 22 episode run. Trust me, if you work on a show that gets cancelled
    after 6 or 13 episodes, you don't think of the show as running a full
    season.
     
    Mark Spatny, Oct 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Mark Spatny <> wrote:

    > jayembee, says...
    >> The only way you could have a show that ran less than one season is if
    >> it didn't run at all.

    >
    > No, plenty of shows run less than one season. Many of the shows in the
    > "one season" thread ran less than one full season. One season being a
    > full 22 episode run. Trust me, if you work on a show that gets cancelled
    > after 6 or 13 episodes, you don't think of the show as running a full
    > season.


    The original question was about series that ran less than one season,
    not series that ran less than one full 22-episode season.

    Seasons aren't defined as consisting of 22 episodes, and no less. If
    that were the case, none of the HBO series would have seasons that
    were full seasons.

    STARGATE SG-1 will have only 20 episodes this season. Does that mean
    it won't have run 8 seasons, just 7 and a fraction? If 20 episodes is
    OK, how about 17 (STRANGE LUCK). Where do you draw the line?

    A series that gets cancelled after eight or nine episodes still has as
    many episodes as THE WONDER YEARS, MOONLIGHTING, CHINA BEACH and
    MAX HEADROOM had in their first seasons.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 6, 2004
    #4
  5. Tom McCafferty

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "jayembee" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Seasons aren't defined as consisting of 22 episodes, and no less. If
    > that were the case, none of the HBO series would have seasons that
    > were full seasons.
    >
    > STARGATE SG-1 will have only 20 episodes this season. Does that mean
    > it won't have run 8 seasons, just 7 and a fraction? If 20 episodes is
    > OK, how about 17 (STRANGE LUCK). Where do you draw the line?


    How about we draw the line at series that are cancelled before all of
    the episodes that have been produced are aired? Make sense?
     
    Joshua Zyber, Oct 6, 2004
    #5
  6. Tom McCafferty

    Mac Breck Guest

    "jayembee" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tom McCafferty <> wrote:
    >
    > > I think, Timecop was one of them.

    >
    > No, TIMECOP ran one season.
    >
    > The only way you could have a show that ran less than one

    season is if
    > it didn't run at all.


    Right, one season means up to and including one complete
    season. I guess less than one season could mean an aired
    Pilot only.

    --
    Mac Breck (KoshN) - from the desktop PC
    -------------------------------
    http://www.scifi.com/babylon5/
    http://www.scifi.com/crusade/
    http://www.scifi.com/bboard/browse.cgi/1/5/1521 (Brimstone)
     
    Mac Breck, Oct 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Tom McCafferty

    Mac Breck Guest

    "Joshua Zyber" <>
    wrote in message
    news:29R8d.8553$...
    > "jayembee" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Seasons aren't defined as consisting of 22 episodes, and

    no less. If
    > > that were the case, none of the HBO series would have

    seasons that
    > > were full seasons.
    > >
    > > STARGATE SG-1 will have only 20 episodes this season.

    Does that mean
    > > it won't have run 8 seasons, just 7 and a fraction? If

    20 episodes is
    > > OK, how about 17 (STRANGE LUCK). Where do you draw the

    line?
    >
    > How about we draw the line at series that are cancelled

    before all of
    > the episodes that have been produced are aired? Make

    sense?

    No because where does that leave shows that shot 13, and
    aired 13, and would have gotten say a 22 episode season if
    the network hadn't cancelled them? No, "What is your
    favourite one season TV show?" means something beyond the
    pilot (if it had one), and less than or equal to one planned
    full season, regardless as to whether all the episodes aired
    or not.

    --
    Mac Breck (KoshN) - from the desktop PC
    -------------------------------
    http://www.scifi.com/babylon5/
    http://www.scifi.com/crusade/
    http://www.scifi.com/bboard/browse.cgi/1/5/1521 (Brimstone)
     
    Mac Breck, Oct 6, 2004
    #7
  8. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    "Mac Breck" <> wrote:

    > "Joshua Zyber" <> wrote:


    >> "jayembee" <> wrote:

    >
    >>> STARGATE SG-1 will have only 20 episodes this season.
    >>> Does that mean it won't have run 8 seasons, just 7
    >>> and a fraction? If 20 episodes is OK, how about 17
    >>> (STRANGE LUCK). Where do you draw the line?

    >>
    >> How about we draw the line at series that are cancelled
    >> before all of the episodes that have been produced are
    >> aired? Make sense?


    Why don't we just call them "prematurely cancelled"?

    > No because where does that leave shows that shot 13, and
    > aired 13, and would have gotten say a 22 episode season
    > if the network hadn't cancelled them?


    Then we get into the problem of defining "cancelled". The
    way I see it, if a network makes an initial order of 13
    episodes, and decides not to order the back nine, that's
    just deciding not to renew it, just as if it was the end
    of the season, and they decide not to renew for a second
    season.

    One might argue that the producers don't get to wrap things
    up sufficiently, but sometimes they do (BIRDS OF PREY),
    while there are times when they don't finish the story even
    with a full 22-ep season (JOHN DOE or DARK SKIES).

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 6, 2004
    #8
  9. Tom McCafferty

    Jordan Lund Guest

    jayembee <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Tom McCafferty <> wrote:
    >
    > > I think, Timecop was one of them.

    >
    > No, TIMECOP ran one season.
    >
    > The only way you could have a show that ran less than one season is if
    > it didn't run at all.


    If it didn't air all the episodes produced or contracted then it could
    be said it ran less than one season.

    Clerks: the Animated series aired, what? TWICE?

    - Jordan
     
    Jordan Lund, Oct 7, 2004
    #9
  10. Tom McCafferty

    Dale Hicks Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    > No because where does that leave shows that shot 13, and
    > aired 13, and would have gotten say a 22 episode season if
    > the network hadn't cancelled them? No, "What is your
    > favourite one season TV show?" means something beyond the
    > pilot (if it had one), and less than or equal to one planned
    > full season, regardless as to whether all the episodes aired
    > or not.


    Say, no one's mentioned "Girls Club" yet.

    I think that series that were planned to be series, yet only managed to
    get a pilot aired, should still be theoretically eligible.

    --
    Cranial Crusader dgh 1138 at bell south point net
     
    Dale Hicks, Oct 7, 2004
    #10
  11. Tom McCafferty

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, Dale Hicks
    <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > says...
    > >
    > > No because where does that leave shows that shot 13, and
    > > aired 13, and would have gotten say a 22 episode season if
    > > the network hadn't cancelled them? No, "What is your
    > > favourite one season TV show?" means something beyond the
    > > pilot (if it had one), and less than or equal to one planned
    > > full season, regardless as to whether all the episodes aired
    > > or not.

    >
    > Say, no one's mentioned "Girls Club" yet.
    >
    > I think that series that were planned to be series, yet only managed to
    > get a pilot aired, should still be theoretically eligible.


    Depends on if it was a "backdoor" pilot, a show aired once that will
    become a regular series if it does well. For example, both Babylon 5
    and the new Battlestar Galactica are examples of shows that were
    greenlighted for series after the pilots aired. The Babylon 5: Rangers
    tv movie is a pilot that failed to do well enough to go to series.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Oct 7, 2004
    #11
  12. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote:

    > Depends on if it was a "backdoor" pilot, a show aired
    > once that will become a regular series if it does well.
    > For example, both Babylon 5 and the new Battlestar
    > Galactica are examples of shows that were greenlighted
    > for series after the pilots aired. The Babylon 5: Rangers
    > tv movie is a pilot that failed to do well enough to go
    > to series.


    "Backdoor pilot" is usually reserved for a series whose
    pilot was done as an episode of an already established
    series. Thus, the series "slips in through the back door".

    A notable successful example is the MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.
    episode "The Moonglow Affair", which was a backdoor pilot
    for the spin-off series THE GIRL FROM U.N.C.L.E. A notable
    unsuccessful example is the STAR TREK episode "Assignment:
    Earth".

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 7, 2004
    #12
  13. Tom McCafferty

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <>, jayembee
    <> wrote:

    > Invid Fan <> wrote:
    >
    > > Depends on if it was a "backdoor" pilot, a show aired
    > > once that will become a regular series if it does well.
    > > For example, both Babylon 5 and the new Battlestar
    > > Galactica are examples of shows that were greenlighted
    > > for series after the pilots aired. The Babylon 5: Rangers
    > > tv movie is a pilot that failed to do well enough to go
    > > to series.

    >
    > "Backdoor pilot" is usually reserved for a series whose
    > pilot was done as an episode of an already established
    > series. Thus, the series "slips in through the back door".
    >

    The US Doctor Who tv movie was called one, so I assumed the term was
    used for anything that was aired to judge interest in a show becoming a
    regular series.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
     
    Invid Fan, Oct 7, 2004
    #13
  14. jayembee wrote:
    >
    >>Depends on if it was a "backdoor" pilot, a show aired
    >>once that will become a regular series if it does well.
    >>For example, both Babylon 5 and the new Battlestar
    >>Galactica are examples of shows that were greenlighted
    >>for series after the pilots aired. The Babylon 5: Rangers
    >>tv movie is a pilot that failed to do well enough to go
    >>to series.

    >
    > "Backdoor pilot" is usually reserved for a series whose
    > pilot was done as an episode of an already established
    > series. Thus, the series "slips in through the back door".


    As noted by the fact that USA's "The 4400" has already gone to disk as
    "The Complete First Season".
    Which is as fair a warning as we'll get.

    Derek Janssen (look, it's Sci-Fi, and they're weasels, okay?)
     
    Derek Janssen, Oct 7, 2004
    #14
  15. Tom McCafferty

    Video Flyer Guest

    On 10/7/04 9:51 AM, in article
    , "jayembee"
    <> wrote:

    > Invid Fan <> wrote:
    >
    >> Depends on if it was a "backdoor" pilot, a show aired
    >> once that will become a regular series if it does well.
    >> For example, both Babylon 5 and the new Battlestar
    >> Galactica are examples of shows that were greenlighted
    >> for series after the pilots aired. The Babylon 5: Rangers
    >> tv movie is a pilot that failed to do well enough to go
    >> to series.

    >
    > "Backdoor pilot" is usually reserved for a series whose
    > pilot was done as an episode of an already established
    > series. Thus, the series "slips in through the back door".
    >
    > A notable successful example is the MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.
    > episode "The Moonglow Affair", which was a backdoor pilot
    > for the spin-off series THE GIRL FROM U.N.C.L.E. A notable
    > unsuccessful example is the STAR TREK episode "Assignment:
    > Earth".
    >
    > -- jayembee




    Hey, I'd forgotten Assignment: Earth was going to be a series. Any idea if
    it ever reached the stage of actually filming an episode?

    Neal
    --
    "If morons could fly, it'd be pitch black." - Anonymous
     
    Video Flyer, Oct 8, 2004
    #15
  16. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Video Flyer <> wrote:

    > Hey, I'd forgotten Assignment: Earth was going to be a
    > series. Any idea if it ever reached the stage of actually
    > filming an episode?


    It didn't.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 8, 2004
    #16
  17. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Invid Fan <> wrote:

    >> "Backdoor pilot" is usually reserved for a series whose
    >> pilot was done as an episode of an already established
    >> series. Thus, the series "slips in through the back door".
    >>

    > The US Doctor Who tv movie was called one, so I assumed
    > the term was used for anything that was aired to judge
    > interest in a show becoming a regular series.


    I think that's just as example of someone using the term
    incorrectly. Just as "prequel" refers to a story that's
    set before another one, but was written/filmed *after* it,
    when some people use it to mean any story taking place
    before another one regardless of when it was created with
    respect to the other one.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 8, 2004
    #17
  18. Tom McCafferty

    Mark Spatny Guest

    jayembee, says...

    > Then we get into the problem of defining "cancelled". The
    > way I see it, if a network makes an initial order of 13
    > episodes, and decides not to order the back nine, that's
    > just deciding not to renew it, just as if it was the end
    > of the season, and they decide not to renew for a second
    > season.


    I suspect if you worked on a show that didn't get picked up for the back
    nine you'd see it differently. You wouldn't say "wow, that was a nice
    first season". You'd say "crap, my show got cancelled. We didn't even
    make it through the first season".

    Mark Spatny
    Veteran of two shows that didn't get picked up for the back nine.
     
    Mark Spatny, Oct 9, 2004
    #18
  19. Tom McCafferty

    jayembee Guest

    Mark Spatny <> wrote:

    > jayembee, says...
    >
    >> Then we get into the problem of defining "cancelled". The
    >> way I see it, if a network makes an initial order of 13
    >> episodes, and decides not to order the back nine, that's
    >> just deciding not to renew it, just as if it was the end
    >> of the season, and they decide not to renew for a second
    >> season.

    >
    > I suspect if you worked on a show that didn't get picked
    > up for the back nine you'd see it differently. You wouldn't
    > say "wow, that was a nice first season". You'd say "crap,
    > my show got cancelled. We didn't even make it through the
    > first season".


    Perhaps. But since I haven't worked on such a show -- and
    am not likely to ever -- my perspective is as it is. That's
    the way of the world.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Oct 9, 2004
    #19
  20. Tom McCafferty

    Guest

    jayembee wrote: The only way you could have a show that ran less than
    one season is if it didn't run at all.
    -----------------------------------------------------

    that isn't correct. There was at least one show, intended to be a weekly
    series and was scheduled as such, and that
    because of a tv station in my area, was cancelled by the whole network,
    all across the whole country, before the program was even over during
    its first and only telecast.

    It was the fastest cancellation of any tv program in history.

    so even though part of it aired, no one across the whole country ever
    saw the conclusion of it on tv since the network cancelled it in
    mid-episode on the first episode before it was over, because of one of
    the tv stations in my area demanding to the network that it better be
    cancelled right away.
     
    , Oct 13, 2004
    #20
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