Hopefully this makes sense

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by HeritageMom, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    My husband bought me a Sony Cybershot H-1 for Christmas for my new
    business and I LOVE it even though I feel like I need a degree in
    rocket science to learn all of it's bells and whistles. My question is
    that I inherited three boxes of SLIDES from my parents passing and I
    heard that there are attachments for cameras (I found one called
    Flex-slide or something) that allow you to take a digital image of a
    slide instead of having to print it or use a negative or slide scanner.

    IF anyone has any experience with such a product OR knows a way that I
    can easily take pictures of all of these slides (the cost to have the
    number I have scanned and burned professionally would pay for my own
    personal film scanner or attachment) I would be SOOOOO happy to know
    about it. These are the small, standard sized slides from the
    mid-70's...not the original and larger ones from the 50's-60's.

    Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

    www.yourlifepreserver.com
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. HeritageMom

    BD Guest

    I was in a similar situation. In my case it was about 5 carousels, and
    half a dozen of the little 40-slide boxes.

    I did them manually, one by one, on a flatbed scanner.

    It took weeks, but the results were really excellent.

    In my case, I knew it would be a PITA job, but once I allowed for the
    fact that it was _not_ going to be done overnight, it ended up being
    almost meditative. Couple of dozen in a session was about all I could
    handle doing.

    I hope you find a better solution. ;)
     
    BD, Feb 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    There are slide duplicators that get mixed reviews, but they are for
    dSLRs with removable lenses..

    There are also dedicated film/negative scanners that start in the $200
    range and they are a little slow.

    A good option is a good quality, flat-bed scanner to scan the slides.

    A fourth, not so good option, but worth a try, is to take a soup can
    and remove both ends. Spray the inside with flat-black paint. Lay the
    slide on a light table (most people who shot slides had one), but the
    can over it and CAREFULLY put your camera on the top of it (obviously
    pointing down) and then see if you focus in the camera's macro mode.
    It wouldn't hurt to pad the top of the can with black electrical tape
    or something, so avoid scratching the slens. This is an old-fashioned
    way of doing it and will give so-so results, but it might be worth
    trying. Be careful with your exposure so you don't overexpose the
    highlights, etc. If it works, it will go quickly. The primary
    advantage to this method is that is doesn't cost very much. The
    disadvantage is your light source might not be even enough.

    But, if another post has a better idea, by all means use that.
    All-in-all, a scanner is probably your best bet.
     
    Pat, Feb 8, 2006
    #3
  4. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    I have a negative scanner, so I've never done it on a flat bed (sorry
    if that sounds inappropriate), but do any of the flat beds allow you to
    scan a whole bunch at once and then isolated the slides and save the
    slides separately?
     
    Pat, Feb 8, 2006
    #4
  5. HeritageMom

    BD Guest

    >save the slides separately?

    You could put many slides on the bed of a flatbed, but the problem is
    resolution - based on my experience, the software has an upper limit of
    image size that it will scan in one shot... the limitation is likely
    the TWAIN software, as opposed to the host package such as Photoshop.
    When you're working with a single slide, you can bump up the dpi to
    2400dpi with no problem - but doing 2400dpi over a large area will
    likely cause problems - at least it did for me when I did it; I was
    using whatever Photoshop was current about 3 years back when I did the
    job. Dropping it down to 300dpi for the sake of getting it all in one
    image will result in dismal image quality.

    My guess - OP should be prepared to spend money on gear or professional
    work, or be prepared for a long haul.

    I'm not suggesting that the OP not do it on a flatbed - worked great
    for me with the dinky little backlight that came with the scanner; it
    just took time.

    FWIW - I tried negatives on the same scanner and the same software, and
    the results were abysmal. Flipping the color values in software
    resulted in a very grainy image. Not sure if it's the color
    interpretation in the Epson software or Photoshop's 'reverse values'
    function that was below par, but for me negatives were just not an
    option.
     
    BD, Feb 8, 2006
    #5
  6. HeritageMom

    John Bates Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > There are slide duplicators that get mixed reviews, but they are for
    > dSLRs with removable lenses..
    >
    > There are also dedicated film/negative scanners that start in the $200
    > range and they are a little slow.
    >
    > A good option is a good quality, flat-bed scanner to scan the slides.
    >
    > A fourth, not so good option, but worth a try, is to take a soup can
    > and remove both ends. Spray the inside with flat-black paint. Lay the
    > slide on a light table (most people who shot slides had one), but the
    > can over it and CAREFULLY put your camera on the top of it (obviously
    > pointing down) and then see if you focus in the camera's macro mode.
    > It wouldn't hurt to pad the top of the can with black electrical tape
    > or something, so avoid scratching the slens. This is an old-fashioned
    > way of doing it and will give so-so results, but it might be worth
    > trying. Be careful with your exposure so you don't overexpose the
    > highlights, etc. If it works, it will go quickly. The primary
    > advantage to this method is that is doesn't cost very much. The
    > disadvantage is your light source might not be even enough.
    >
    > But, if another post has a better idea, by all means use that.
    > All-in-all, a scanner is probably your best bet.


    FWIW
    I have had good results when using an old slide projector
    focused on a sheet of white A4 card and taking hand held
    shots of same. I now intend to set the camera up with a
    tripod as my Daughter has found boxes of slides that she
    wants me to do.
    John.
     
    John Bates, Feb 9, 2006
    #6
  7. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    THAT is such a good idea! I never thought of that option. I'm a tad
    daft and have no idea what white 4A card is....just plain posterboard
    or card stock? Help me Obiwan, you MIGHT be my only hope!

    You guys ROCK!!!

    LeAnn
    P.S. Check out my website at www.yourlifepreserver.com to see the books
    we make and why I want to get all these old photos and slides done!
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #7
  8. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    Again, I'm the one asking for advice here, but I DO know Photoshop and
    I'm assuming you could probably place a bunch on the flatbed, then scan
    them at the highest resolution possible and once you have an image of
    6-8 slides, you could take that image into photoshop, crop each one out
    and increase the size and store them as individual files. I'm so
    excited about trying my every day scanner I can't stand it! I'll let
    you know if my idea to your post works.....
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #8
  9. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    I LOVE you guys! I have a really good HP flatbed scanner, I just
    thought you needed a special kind of scanner to do slides, so I never
    even TRIED to use it. I guess I'll give it a go and see what results I
    get. I LOVE your soup can idea...you creative person you! I don't have
    a light table though (dad was inconsiderate enough to leave me the
    slides ONLY)...so I might go see if I can rent one or volunteer at a
    hospital or something! (teasing)

    So basically the idea is to get the slide far enough away from the
    camera that you're getting a telephoto effect...sort of...and enough
    light to "expose" what is on the slide.

    I love the idea of using a slide projector and setting up my tripod and
    seeing if I can't just get a good "image" off of white paper...although
    old slide projectors never really did give great/clear images. You have
    all given me a LOT of things to try! Thank you SO much!

    One of the reasons I don't want to send them all to be processed is
    that for the most part I have no idea what is on them except a lot of
    Navy pictures from Vietnam etc and some of them might even be repeats
    that I dont' want copies of anyway.

    Let me toss this one out there...although it would have to be done
    carefully to avoid burning my eye sockets out. What about using the
    soup can idea with a rigged slide mount at the other end and pointing
    the camera into direct sunlight....I know I KNOW...being VERY careful,
    but having the SUN (natural light and INTENSE at that) be my backlight
    and when I can see the picture clearly...then taking the shot? I would
    have to create a totally black surround that held only one slide at a
    time and blocked all other light around the slide to protect exposure
    to the lense, but...would it work? And what about a pringles can
    emptied for more distance? Where is McGyver when I need him??????

    Thank you all so much!!!! If this works, I'll get them all done AND
    have created some fun toys in the process!
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #9
  10. HeritageMom

    Steve Guest

    "HeritageMom" <> wrote in message
    news:.googlegroups.com...

    > I LOVE you guys! I have a really good HP flatbed scanner, I just
    > thought you needed a special kind of scanner to do slides, so I never
    > even TRIED to use it. I guess I'll give it a go and see what results I
    > get. I LOVE your soup can idea...you creative person you! I don't have
    > a light table though (dad was inconsiderate enough to leave me the
    > slides ONLY)...so I might go see if I can rent one or volunteer at a
    > hospital or something! (teasing)
    >
    > So basically the idea is to get the slide far enough away from the
    > camera that you're getting a telephoto effect...sort of...and enough
    > light to "expose" what is on the slide.
    >
    > I love the idea of using a slide projector and setting up my tripod and
    > seeing if I can't just get a good "image" off of white paper...although
    > old slide projectors never really did give great/clear images. You have
    > all given me a LOT of things to try! Thank you SO much!
    >
    > One of the reasons I don't want to send them all to be processed is
    > that for the most part I have no idea what is on them except a lot of
    > Navy pictures from Vietnam etc and some of them might even be repeats
    > that I dont' want copies of anyway.
    >
    > Let me toss this one out there...although it would have to be done
    > carefully to avoid burning my eye sockets out. What about using the
    > soup can idea with a rigged slide mount at the other end and pointing
    > the camera into direct sunlight....I know I KNOW...being VERY careful,
    > but having the SUN (natural light and INTENSE at that) be my backlight
    > and when I can see the picture clearly...then taking the shot? I would
    > have to create a totally black surround that held only one slide at a
    > time and blocked all other light around the slide to protect exposure
    > to the lense, but...would it work? And what about a pringles can
    > emptied for more distance? Where is McGyver when I need him??????
    >
    > Thank you all so much!!!! If this works, I'll get them all done AND
    > have created some fun toys in the process!


    here is a homemade slide copier -
    http://users.iafrica.com/m/mc/mcollett/brsd/index.htm
     
    Steve, Feb 9, 2006
    #10
  11. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    A couple of things.

    You can shoot project it onto paper and reshoot them. A slide screen
    might work better because it reflects more. But slide projector bulbs
    aren't terribly even, so it might be a little blotchy. The other
    problem is parralex. You don't want the distortions but there's a work
    around -- not a good one -- but a workaround none the less. Get your
    slide projector and camera level. Figure out where the point is that
    is directly in front of the screen/paper. Move the projector a foot or
    so to the left or right (to intentionally create a known amount of
    parralex). Then move your camera the exact distance in the opposite
    direction. That parralex will counter the first one.

    I wouldn't shoot into the sun. Maybe tape a piece of tracing paper to
    a window and use that to diffuse the light. But you are then shooting
    horizontal and have to hold the slide. Do you have one of those low
    power flouresent lights under your kitchen counter? You could take
    that down, flip it upside down (i.e. point it up), and put a piece of
    white paper over it to diffuse the light. But you need to
    white-balance your camera to correct the light back to white. On an
    overcast day, you could also put a piece of white cardboard on a table
    outside and elavate a piece of glass over it (maybe supported by soup
    cans?) and use the reflected light (don't get your shadow over it).

    As for your scanner (a.k.a the best solution) some might need an
    adaptor or something but it can be done. Check the manual.

    I can't speak with certainty re A4 paper, but I believe it is
    essentially letter-size paper for people in Europe or other places that
    don't use 8.5x11 because they use Metric. A quick, unrelated story
    about metric: We live near the Canadian border. I was at Christmas
    mass and the choir was singing "Gloria" which contains the Latin "in
    excelcius Deo" (or however it is spelled) and I said to my mother "what
    does 'in excelcius' mean?" Before she could answer, my 11-year-old
    said "That's how they measure the temperature in Canada.
     
    Pat, Feb 9, 2006
    #11
  12. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    Somebody put a lot of effort not only into the slide copier but the
    tutorial! Thank you so much for that link! I may need it!
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #12
  13. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    Ta da. I think we have a winner!!!!

    But I would still spraypaint the inside flat black but if you have a
    good light seal, you wouldn't have to.

    But how can you build it without duct tape?
     
    Pat, Feb 9, 2006
    #13
  14. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    I think BD's point is valid. If you try a whole bunch as a time, the
    file size will get so big your life will be miserable.
     
    Pat, Feb 9, 2006
    #14
  15. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    I have a negative scanner from the days when I shot film and scanned
    the negs. In order to get a good scan, you have to tell it what brand
    of film you are using so it can get the colors right. It is pretty
    picky.
     
    Pat, Feb 9, 2006
    #15
  16. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    How do we build ANYTHING without duct tape???? LOL!! My husband is from
    Texas and it's like the main ingredient in ANY project!!
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #16
  17. HeritageMom

    Hunt Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    >
    >My husband bought me a Sony Cybershot H-1 for Christmas for my new
    >business and I LOVE it even though I feel like I need a degree in
    >rocket science to learn all of it's bells and whistles. My question is
    >that I inherited three boxes of SLIDES from my parents passing and I
    >heard that there are attachments for cameras (I found one called
    >Flex-slide or something) that allow you to take a digital image of a
    >slide instead of having to print it or use a negative or slide scanner.
    >
    >IF anyone has any experience with such a product OR knows a way that I
    >can easily take pictures of all of these slides (the cost to have the
    >number I have scanned and burned professionally would pay for my own
    >personal film scanner or attachment) I would be SOOOOO happy to know
    >about it. These are the small, standard sized slides from the
    >mid-70's...not the original and larger ones from the 50's-60's.
    >
    >Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?
    >
    >www.yourlifepreserver.com


    Back in the very old "film days," I purchased a unit, probably similar to the
    one, that you allude to. It seems that it was from Spiratone, but I could be
    wrong. It did a passable job at slide duping, but only passable. Within about
    3 months, I had acquired a bellows unit, lens reversing ring, and slide holder
    for my Nikons. This rig was about 90% of exact quality. Later, I picked up a
    Honeywell slide dupe "machine," and got to around 95%.

    Depending on what you wish to do, you might explore the device, and see if it
    meets your needs. This, of course, depends on what you want, and what it
    costs.

    Nowadays, I use a Nikon film scanner for this sort of work, but I do enough of
    it, to justify the expense.

    If you don't have too many slides, explore a lab/service bureau, and have them
    scan to CD/DVD for you. Now, if you wish to tinker, try the device and see if
    you can live with the results.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Feb 9, 2006
    #17
  18. HeritageMom

    Pat Guest

    If it moves and it shouldn't -- use duct tape.

    If it doesn't move and it should -- use WD40.

    Your only problem is that if you husband is from Texas, he's going to
    have to make the duplicator bigger and better, isn't he?

    Steve's gadget is a great idea. Good luck with it.
     
    Pat, Feb 9, 2006
    #18
  19. HeritageMom

    Hunt Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    [SNIP]
    >One of the reasons I don't want to send them all to be processed is
    >that for the most part I have no idea what is on them except a lot of
    >Navy pictures from Vietnam etc and some of them might even be repeats
    >that I dont' want copies of anyway.
    >

    [SNIP]

    The first thing you should do is get a pack of slide "pages" from the
    photostore. I'm sure they still have them. Accu-Vue was a really good one.
    Most hold ~36 slides. Load your slides into these, and then hold the sheet of
    slides up to your window - cloudy day, or North sky works very well. Look at
    these and remove the dupes. Store them in one of the slide boxes, marked "Out
    Takes." Keep the rest. Fill in the now empty slots with "keeper" slides from
    the other pages. If need be, buy a cheap loupe from the photoshop (4x should
    work well, and the plastic ones are about US$8.00. Check out the slides that
    you have in the sheets, and weed out any that are out of focus, show camera
    movement, etc.

    Finally, you will have the slides that you wish to copy. Then, you can decide
    the method of duplication.

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Feb 9, 2006
    #19
  20. HeritageMom

    HeritageMom Guest

    ROFL!!! What a sharp 11 year old! That's a keeper to torment my
    Canadian friends with!

    My eyes glazed over at the word parralex but I forced myself to focus
    and be a good student. God bless technology.

    I don't have one of them handy dandy lights, other than the one on my
    kitchen ceiling and at this point I'm contemplating doing a
    "Michaelangelo" and laying on ladders and using IT as my light box!!!
    If it's got a white cover...does that work as a difuser? (OK...I must
    be really tired because I'm already working through the process of
    getting ladders.....LOL)

    My husband's work lights in the shop just got put on the list of
    possibilities...
     
    HeritageMom, Feb 9, 2006
    #20
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