Home VOIP gateway for outgoing calls while I'm on the road.

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by Tony Toews, Oct 22, 2005.

  1. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    Folks

    Some of the terminology baffles me so I'll ask. I want setup a gateway on my home
    ADSL network. The idea is that if I'm out of town I can somehow hit my own
    PC/network at home from my laptop at clients or hotel room, with my speakers and
    microphone, and make an outgoing phone call from my own phone.

    (I have the software in place so I know what IP address is at my home network. I can
    currently Terminal Server in quite nicely.)

    Yes, yes, I know I could use Skype or whatever but I want to do this all myself.
    Among other things the phone number on the callerid will be my own.

    Thanks, Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tony Toews <> writes:
    > I want setup a gateway on my home ADSL network. The idea is that
    > if I'm out of town I can somehow hit my own PC/network at home from
    > my laptop at clients or hotel room, with my speakers and microphone,
    > and make an outgoing phone call from my own phone.


    Well, this is trivial if you have a voip service provider that lets
    you bring your own phone. You just set up your computer (or take
    another ATA along on the trip with you) and configure the same
    account-name/password into it as your home unit. Both units will ring
    for incoming calls and either unit (or both) can make outgoing calls
    and show the same caller-id number. The voip service providers that
    charge by the minute usually couldn't care less how many ATA's you
    provision for the same account. There are quite a few that charge in
    the 2-3 cent per minute range, so we aren't talking about a lot of
    money.

    A list of mostly per minute providers can be found at this next URL.
    I use both Gefachi and Teliax. Both have no monthlies and have 2 cent
    minutes. There are probably others that popped up since the last time
    I checked the field. If you find others, please speak up.

    http://www.voip-info.org/wiki/view/VOIP Service Providers B2B

    The voice service providers that charge you a flat-fee per month
    usually don't even let you look at the settings in your ATA. They
    have no interest in letting you program several units for the same
    account. Unless you make over 1000 - 2000 minutes of calls per month
    you'd probably want to avoid these guys anyway. The numbers for the
    per minute service will be much more favorable.

    Now if you are asking about using your normal analog phone line via a
    voip call over the net, you can do that too. Some ATA's like the
    Sipura SPA-3000 will let you call out on your analog phone after
    calling into the unit via VOIP. I have one of these and that trick
    does work, but the quality of the connection isn't that great. I
    ended up just using the SPA-3000 as a souped-up answering machine
    (along with asterisk). I ask people to just call my voip number and
    ignore my analog line all together.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
    Microsoft Vista - because "Virus Installer" was too long.
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, Oct 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    "Wolfgang S. Rupprecht" <>
    wrote:

    >> I want setup a gateway on my home ADSL network. The idea is that
    >> if I'm out of town I can somehow hit my own PC/network at home from
    >> my laptop at clients or hotel room, with my speakers and microphone,
    >> and make an outgoing phone call from my own phone.

    >
    >Well, this is trivial if you have a voip service provider that lets
    >you bring your own phone.


    I do not have nor do I want a voip service provider.

    >Now if you are asking about using your normal analog phone line via a
    >voip call over the net, you can do that too.


    Yes, that's exactly what I mean. Using a headset and microphone attached to my
    laptop.

    >Some ATA's like the
    >Sipura SPA-3000 will let you call out on your analog phone after
    >calling into the unit via VOIP. I have one of these and that trick
    >does work, but the quality of the connection isn't that great. I
    >ended up just using the SPA-3000 as a souped-up answering machine
    >(along with asterisk). I ask people to just call my voip number and
    >ignore my analog line all together.


    So what does ATA stand for? When I visit http://www.sipura.com/products/spa3000.htm
    I know what the PSTN acronym means, I think, but not ATA What dos FXO mean?

    What do I use as a search term to find devices like this one?

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    Tony Toews <> wrote:

    >The idea is that if I'm out of town I can somehow hit my own
    >PC/network at home from my laptop at clients or hotel room, with my speakers and
    >microphone, and make an outgoing phone call from my own phone.


    Oh yeah, when I'm not travelling I spend a fair bit of time in a friends coffee shop
    so it'd be nice to make phone calls from there instead of using my more expensive
    cell phone. <smile>

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Tony Toews <> writes:
    > So what does ATA stand for? When I visit
    > http://www.sipura.com/products/spa3000.htm I know what the PSTN
    > acronym means, I think, but not ATA What dos FXO mean?


    ATA probably stands for "analog telephone adaptor". FXO is a telco
    word that means "connects to a switch" in contrast to FSO which
    "connects to a telephone". Aren't you glad you asked. ;-)

    I don't think there are any other ATA's that connect to incoming
    phone-line side of things (fxo). All the other ones I know of have
    one or to telephone interfaces (FSO's). You can try your luck
    googling for "ATA FXO", but I suspect all roads will lead back to the
    SPA-3000.

    The only other possibilities I know of are running asterisk and
    getting a cheap fxo PCI card. The official asterisk card by itself is
    about the same price as the spa-3000, so you don't save any money
    going that route, but you do get the flexibility of using asterisk as
    a really tricked-out fully-programmable answering machine.

    -wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, Oct 23, 2005
    #5
  6. [ try #2, I superseded the earlier article but some news servers will
    show it anyway. A brain fart made me type FSO instead of FXS. -wsr ]

    Tony Toews <> writes:
    > So what does ATA stand for? When I visit
    > http://www.sipura.com/products/spa3000.htm I know what the PSTN
    > acronym means, I think, but not ATA What dos FXO mean?


    ATA probably stands for "analog telephone adaptor". FXO is a telco
    word that means "connects to a switch" in contrast to FXS which
    "connects to a telephone". Aren't you glad you asked. ;-)

    You can try your luck googling for "ATA FXO", but the pickings are
    fairly slim. I just looked and in addition to the Sipura SPA-3000
    there is now the Grandstream Handytone ATA-488.

    The only other possibilities I know of are running asterisk and
    getting a Digium FXO PCI card. The official asterisk card by itself
    is about the same price as the SPA-3000, so you don't save any money
    going that route, but you do get the flexibility of using asterisk as
    a really tricked-out fully-programmable answering machine. Thats more
    or less what I do, but I use a SPA-3000 to keep the phone line at
    least one black-box away from my computer.

    -wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, Oct 23, 2005
    #6
  7. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    "Wolfgang S. Rupprecht" <>
    wrote:

    >ATA probably stands for "analog telephone adaptor". FXO is a telco
    >word that means "connects to a switch" in contrast to FXS which
    >"connects to a telephone". Aren't you glad you asked. ;-)


    Ahhhh, Makes sense from what use I'd seen of those terms. Thanks muchly.

    >You can try your luck googling for "ATA FXO", but the pickings are
    >fairly slim. I just looked and in addition to the Sipura SPA-3000
    >there is now the Grandstream Handytone ATA-488.


    Thanks for browsing for me.

    >The only other possibilities I know of are running asterisk and
    >getting a Digium FXO PCI card. The official asterisk card by itself
    >is about the same price as the SPA-3000, so you don't save any money
    >going that route, but you do get the flexibility of using asterisk as
    >a really tricked-out fully-programmable answering machine. Thats more
    >or less what I do, but I use a SPA-3000 to keep the phone line at
    >least one black-box away from my computer.


    I already have some software running on my home system that does voicemail and fax
    using an el cheapo PCI voice modem. And it emails those to me. Besides Asterisk,
    from what I've been able to glean runs under Linux thus requiring it's own machine.
    That's something I'm not at all sure I want to get into right now.

    Mind you I really like the concept of open source PBX systems and so forth. I'll
    have to fire these links off to my buddies who would think these kinds of things are
    really, really cool. <smile> (Done. Along with an editorial comment on how you
    could likely have a backup PBX as well as a primary PBX for the same price as the
    commerical systems.)

    So an stand alone black box with an RJ 45 and POTS connections will do me just fine.
    All I'd need to do is configure my router to route the incoming packets on the
    port(s) to the black box.

    Thanks muchly, Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 23, 2005
    #7
  8. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    Tony Toews <> wrote:

    >Some of the terminology baffles me so I'll ask. I want setup a gateway on my home
    >ADSL network.


    It has been suggested that I use the Firefly as the client phone software on my
    laptop.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 23, 2005
    #8
  9. Tony Toews

    NEP Guest

    Sorry as I am not sure did I get your meaning exactly.
    You want to call on SIP via internet thru laptop on software while you are
    out of town in something like hotel?

    If so, you can try to use my net fone, as they have a software version which
    u can call via SIP services to any australian phone no..
    I never try that as I did purchase a phone style VoIP using SIP Services.

    If you only want to call back to home via internet to save the money, I can
    suggest you this:
    http://www.uni-net.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=4&id=76&Itemid=41

    If you want further information you can check it out from them.



    "Tony Toews" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tony Toews <> wrote:
    >
    >>Some of the terminology baffles me so I'll ask. I want setup a gateway on
    >>my home
    >>ADSL network.

    >
    > It has been suggested that I use the Firefly as the client phone software
    > on my
    > laptop.
    >
    > Tony
    > --
    > Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    > Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    > read the entire thread of messages.
    > Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    > http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    NEP, Oct 25, 2005
    #9
  10. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    "NEP" <> wrote:

    >Sorry as I am not sure did I get your meaning exactly.
    >You want to call on SIP via internet thru laptop on software while you are
    >out of town in something like hotel?


    Correct.

    But what do you mean by SIP?

    >If you only want to call back to home via internet to save the money, I can
    >suggest you this:
    >http://www.uni-net.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=4&id=76&Itemid=41


    Actually I wouldn't really be saving money as my telco's long distance is likely a
    bit more expensive than some of the Internet phone options.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 25, 2005
    #10
  11. Tony Toews

    Tony Toews Guest

    "NEP" <> wrote:

    >If you only want to call back to home via internet to save the money, I can
    >suggest you this:


    No, I want to make outgoing calls via my home telephone line while I'm out of town or
    at my coffee shop.

    Tony
    --
    Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
    Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
    read the entire thread of messages.
    Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
    http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
     
    Tony Toews, Oct 25, 2005
    #11
  12. Tony Toews

    Miguel Cruz Guest

    Tony Toews <> wrote:
    > No, I want to make outgoing calls via my home telephone line while I'm out
    > of town or at my coffee shop.


    You have expressed an interest in not signing up with a VoIP service, but at
    the risk of incurring your considerable wrath, allow me to suggest you at
    least consider it as it may be the easiest solution.

    You can sign up for prepaid pay-as-you-go service (no monthly fees), pay 2
    cents a minute to USA/Canada/western Europe/developed Asia/Australia, and
    configure your caller ID to be whatever you like (including your home
    number). Then you can either use a standalone IP phone, or a soft phone on
    your computer, and not mess around with anything at home. You save one piece
    of equipment, you avoid tying up your home phone line, and you eliminate a
    lot of complexity.

    miguel
    --
    Hit The Road! Photos from 38 countries on 5 continents: http://travel.u.nu
    Latest photos: Burma; Hong Kong; Macau; Amsterdam; Grand Canyon; Amman
    Airports of the world: http://airport.u.nu
     
    Miguel Cruz, Oct 28, 2005
    #12
  13. Tony Toews

    wkearney99 Guest

    > I ended up just using the SPA-3000 as a souped-up answering machine
    > (along with asterisk).


    What would you have used instead? I'm considering a similar sort of setup,
    along with asterisk, and wonder which units to consider. Using an SPA-3000
    (or similar) would allow bypassing the VoIP setup should power go out,
    granted only on the analog handset attached to it but I can live with that.
    I'm looking to add at least two other analog 'lines' internally to use as
    extensions with normal telco handsets. But only the one outside POTS line
    and, of course, a DSL connection.

    -Bill Kearney
     
    wkearney99, Oct 28, 2005
    #13
  14. Tony Toews

    Ivor Jones Guest

    "wkearney99" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > > I ended up just using the SPA-3000 as a souped-up
    > > answering machine (along with asterisk).

    >
    > What would you have used instead? I'm considering a
    > similar sort of setup, along with asterisk, and wonder
    > which units to consider. Using an SPA-3000 (or similar)
    > would allow bypassing the VoIP setup should power go out,
    > granted only on the analog handset attached to it but I
    > can live with that. I'm looking to add at least two other
    > analog 'lines' internally to use as extensions with
    > normal telco handsets. But only the one outside POTS
    > line and, of course, a DSL connection.
    >
    > -Bill Kearney


    I use an AVM Fritz!Box Fon (www.avm.de/en) with the two phone ports
    feeding into a London 16 PABX, which then feeds all the phones in the
    house. The POTS line also connects into the Fritz!Box as a backup in case
    of power failure, although only the phones designated as power-fail phones
    will work in this case. The other advantage is that dialling rules can be
    set to route certain numbers such as emergency calls and premium rate
    prefixes via the PSTN rather than over a VoIP line where they are either
    not supported or more expensive. It's also possible, using the PABX, to
    have a single DECT handset ring for all incoming lines.

    Ivor
     
    Ivor Jones, Oct 28, 2005
    #14

  15. >> I ended up just using the SPA-3000 as a souped-up answering machine
    >> (along with asterisk).

    >
    > What would you have used instead? I'm considering a similar sort of setup,
    > along with asterisk, and wonder which units to consider. Using an SPA-3000
    > (or similar) would allow bypassing the VoIP setup should power go out,
    > granted only on the analog handset attached to it but I can live with that.
    > I'm looking to add at least two other analog 'lines' internally to use as
    > extensions with normal telco handsets. But only the one outside POTS line
    > and, of course, a DSL connection.


    I was so underwhelmed by the quality of a voip call made via my pots
    line that I just gave up on the whole idea. The problem was that the
    volume was so low I had a hard time hearing the other side. When I
    bumped the gain up in the SPA-3000 the echo was quite evident and much
    to loud to ignore. I'd hear my own voice echo after half a second or
    so. The volume of the echo was roughly the same as the person talking
    at the other end.

    I briefly thought about getting a digital line such as ISDN. That
    should get rid of the electrical echo sources at my end.
    Unfortunately, unlike Europe where ISDN often costs the same as analog
    (POTS), PacBell wanted quite a bit more.

    (It wasn't even possible to find out exactly what they offered and how
    much it cost since their web site is so screwed up. "What, you want
    us to post a price list where people can see it??? Unthinkable!")

    I now use two low-cost voip providers to essentially "host" my phone
    connection for me. It is a little bit more expensive to make calls to
    my neighbors (2cents/min), but calling even a few miles away it is
    cheaper than what I would be paying on the analog line. Echo also
    isn't much of an issue. Sometimes there is a bit of echo initially,
    but the echo cancelers in the phone system itself manages to tune that
    out after a few seconds of training.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, Oct 28, 2005
    #15
  16. Tony Toews

    wkearney99 Guest

    > I use an AVM Fritz!Box Fon (www.avm.de/en) with the two phone ports

    Are the two ports independent? Can each one have it's own conversation
    going (assuming a route is available, of course). Can they share the same
    conversation (conference call)?

    I don't see a US supplier listed for this product.

    -Bill Kearney
     
    wkearney99, Oct 29, 2005
    #16
  17. Tony Toews

    wkearney99 Guest

    > I was so underwhelmed by the quality of a voip call made via my pots
    > line that I just gave up on the whole idea. The problem was that the
    > volume was so low I had a hard time hearing the other side. When I
    > bumped the gain up in the SPA-3000 the echo was quite evident and much
    > to loud to ignore. I'd hear my own voice echo after half a second or
    > so. The volume of the echo was roughly the same as the person talking
    > at the other end.


    So you had two main problems, volume and latency. The volume question would
    certainly be dependent on the quality of the ATA in the SPA-3000. The echo
    might be more affected by available network bandwidth and it's latency.
    Having a line with enough bandwidth is important but it has to be a
    responsive link as well as 'fast enough'. I'd wonder if your setup
    introduced more latency than it could overcome?

    > I now use two low-cost voip providers to essentially "host" my phone
    > connection for me. It is a little bit more expensive to make calls to
    > my neighbors (2cents/min)


    Here's the thing, right now I can depend on the ILEC to provide a consistent
    level of performance. That and since I'm on a shared DSL line (with POTS)
    I'm going to have the analog connection anyway. Since I'm paying for it I
    might as well make use of it.

    I'm not sure how often I'd bother using the POTS for VoIP redirects. Being
    'able' to use it effectively would be nice, but not unless the echo and
    volume were at reasonable levels. I'd certainly want to use at least one of
    the inside handsets as a direct-out POTS connection should power go out, and
    most external (non-PCI) FXS/FXO ATA devices seem to support this capability.
    The question remains, which one 'sucks the least'?

    -Bill Kearney
     
    wkearney99, Oct 29, 2005
    #17
  18. Tony Toews

    Ivor Jones Guest

    "wkearney99" <> wrote in message
    news:
    > > I use an AVM Fritz!Box Fon (www.avm.de/en) with the two
    > > phone ports

    >
    > Are the two ports independent? Can each one have it's
    > own conversation going (assuming a route is available, of
    > course). Can they share the same conversation
    > (conference call)?


    Yes they are completely independent and can be set up for different
    providers. The unit contains a PBX so theoretically I think you could link
    the two ports in a conference call, but having a PABX already I've never
    tried it.

    > I don't see a US supplier listed for this product.


    It's still fairly new, I don't think it's being aggressively marketed
    outside of Germany, even in the UK there are only a couple of suppliers.

    I could make enquiries for you if you want, but I'd need to know a little
    more about the specs for ADSL on your line.


    Ivor
     
    Ivor Jones, Oct 29, 2005
    #18
  19. Tony Toews

    wkearney99 Guest

    > > Are the two ports independent? Can each one have it's
    > > own conversation going (assuming a route is available, of
    > > course). Can they share the same conversation
    > > (conference call)?

    >
    > Yes they are completely independent and can be set up for different
    > providers. The unit contains a PBX so theoretically I think you could link
    > the two ports in a conference call, but having a PABX already I've never
    > tried it.


    That's good to know. I'm not sure we've got the need to use a PBX here.
    I've dealt with them before (spec'ing, setup and management) so I'm well
    aware of their benefits. But for the handful of extensions we'd use here at
    the house it'd be overkill. Besides, I'd be more likely to go with smart
    VoIP phones like Cisco (to get the graphic display features).

    > I could make enquiries for you if you want, but I'd need to know a little
    > more about the specs for ADSL on your line.


    Does it plug directly into the ADSL line? I was under the impression it'd
    use a regular wired ethernet line from whatever connection is already active
    (cable, xDSL, whatever). I ask this as there's an outside chance we might
    switch to using the local telco's fiber service. So being capable of using
    the ADSL line is a nice feature, I wouldn't want to get stuck with it.
    Dunno what our ADSL line uses other than to say Westell and Zyxel ADSL
    modems are interchangeable on it.

    -Bill Kearney
     
    wkearney99, Oct 31, 2005
    #19

  20. > So you had two main problems, volume and latency. The volume
    > question would certainly be dependent on the quality of the ATA in
    > the SPA-3000. The echo might be more affected by available network
    > bandwidth and it's latency. Having a line with enough bandwidth is
    > important but it has to be a responsive link as well as 'fast
    > enough'. I'd wonder if your setup introduced more latency than it
    > could overcome?


    My theory is that the volume is low because Sipura knows they will
    have an echo problem if they bump the volume to be normal phone
    volume. The way to prevent an echo (which is mathematically just a
    dampened oscillation) is to cut the gain of the loop. That is exactly
    what they did and why there isn't any audible echo with the factory
    settings. The volume at factory settings is quite inferior to the
    volume one would get on a normal analog POTS phone.

    From the reading I've done, echo is a major problem in the analog
    phone system. The only reason it isn't annoying normally is that the
    ear is very good about removing echo if it occurs within a very short
    time of the primary signal and with a signal-volume below a certain
    level. The longer the echo delay the lower the volume has to be for
    the ear to remove the echo. (Talking in a room with reflective walls
    would be very annoying if the ear wouldn't automatically filter the
    10ms - ~100ms echos one normally gets from walls that are 5ft to 50ft
    away.)

    The normal phone system simply punts on the echo removal for local
    (short echo delay) calls, assuming that the user's ear will be able to
    sort the matter out even if echo volume is quite high. Thats all nice
    and good until one adds this echo to the packetization delays (20ms at
    least for voip codecs) and jitter buffer delays (in the 100ms+ range).
    At that point the ear refuses to filter the echos since they are too
    loud for that long a delay.

    Setting the jitter buffer to lower delay values will certainly cut the
    delay, but it also cuts how much jitter the unit can mask. I opted to
    cut the jitter buffer to the lowest value. I don't think that has
    caused any problems.

    The phone call that "broke the camels back" and caused me to stop
    using the spa3k for anything but answering machine use was an LD call
    from someone behind an older PBX in the Washington DC area calling me
    in the San Francisco area on my residential POTS line. The echo was
    clearly far-end echo from some mismatch at their PBX. Calls from LD
    POTS users were usually a bit better, but still far from perfect.

    Internally everything here runs to a cheap gigabit switch that ties
    the other voip phones to the spa3k. I don't expect the 5 voip boxes
    each connected to the switch with a 10Mbit/sec NIC at their end to be
    able to saturate the switch's switch fabric.

    > Here's the thing, right now I can depend on the ILEC to provide a consistent
    > level of performance. That and since I'm on a shared DSL line (with POTS)
    > I'm going to have the analog connection anyway. Since I'm paying for it I
    > might as well make use of it.


    I'm forced to have the POTS line too. I just called and had all the
    extra cost features removed and had it changed to per-minute billing.
    I just think of it as part of the cost of getting ADSL. I will of
    course keep this in mind when comparing the total ADSL price to cable.

    > I'm not sure how often I'd bother using the POTS for VoIP redirects. Being
    > 'able' to use it effectively would be nice, but not unless the echo and
    > volume were at reasonable levels. I'd certainly want to use at least one of
    > the inside handsets as a direct-out POTS connection should power go out, and
    > most external (non-PCI) FXS/FXO ATA devices seem to support this capability.
    > The question remains, which one 'sucks the least'?


    I encourage you to give it a try. You may have better luck than I did
    due to better external wiring to the CO etc. I can't remember if my
    initial tests were with the pots on the 14kft loop to the CO or if it
    was already with the 1kft loop to the local RT.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
     
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht, Oct 31, 2005
    #20
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