Home Network Problems (Newbie Questions)

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by news.ntlworld.com, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. Hi All,

    I am a real newbie in setting up routers, this is my first router set up for
    a small business that I run myself. I have A Cisco 851 router, a printer
    and two PC's both running Windows XP SP2 (fully updated).

    My WAN port on my router is contected to my broadband modem (my PC's share 1
    internet connection). My printer and PC's are connected to the LAN ports on
    the router (all Ethernet). Everything is connected using Cat 5 patch
    cables. I can access the internet from either PC with no problems
    whatsoever, I can also print from either PC to the printer which is also
    connected to the router (and not directly to a PC). However, I can not get
    my PC's to recognise each other to perform file sharing.

    I have a VLAN set up on the router (auto-configured by SDM). Windows
    firewall is turned off (but Norton is still enabled). I have TCP/IP
    installed on both machines, I have both machines in the same Workgroup with
    differenet "Machine Names" and "Descriptions". I have also set up a
    "network share" folder inside the regular windows share folder that you see
    when you click "my computer" ("shared documents" and "documents"), I have
    also tried sharing the whole C drive. In my network places I can see my
    "workgroup", but when I try to open it/connect no computer names are listed
    and I get an error message:

    "Workgroup is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this
    network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if
    you have access permissions. The list of servers for this workgroup is
    currently unavailable."

    However I am presently running an administrator account on both machines to
    get them set up. Do I have to set permissions for something else? As far
    as I am aware I don't run a server either, so what "list of servers" should
    I have?

    I can ping my router (which has an address I assigned to it) and get a
    positive response, and I can ping my printer and get a positive response,
    but if I try to ping either of the PC's I get a "request timed out"
    response. I can ping each machine locally (if that is the correct term) i.e
    ping 127.0.0.1, but if I try to ping the address the VLAN has assigned to
    the PC (or the other PC on my LAN) that is when I get a "request timed out
    message". I can actually ping my real IP address also (the address assigned
    to me by my ISP).

    I am a real beginner in all this so I was wondering if anyone has some
    pointers here (would be much appreciated), is there something I am missing?
    All I want to do is be able to do is share files between two PC's on the
    same LAN, enabling them both to connect to the internet, but not allowing
    machines on the internet to "file share" with either of the PC's or have any
    other kind of access to the PC's on my LAN.

    Additional Details.

    Network Connections shows the address assigned by the router's VLAN, not my
    real IP address for each of my PC's. So for instance if I gave my router
    the address of 74.74.74.1, my PC's & printers IP's are 74.74.74.2,
    74.74.74.3, & 74.74.74.4. The subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, and I use DHCP
    to get an IP address from my ISP, but usually 99.9% of the time my IP
    address appears to be the same. IPv6 is enabled.

    Additional Questions:

    Does the IP address of my router have to be a special address assigned to me
    by my ISP or can I chose "any" address?

    Should I have to perform additional configurations on the router to enable
    computers on the same LAN to use file sharing? If so what are they?

    -------
    Thanks in advance
    CB.
     
    news.ntlworld.com, Dec 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. news.ntlworld.com

    Rosco Guest

    news.ntlworld.com cried out

    > Hi All,
    >
    > I am a real newbie in setting up routers, this is my first router
    > set up for a small business that I run myself. I have A Cisco 851
    > router, a printer and two PC's both running Windows XP SP2 (fully
    > updated).
    >
    > My WAN port on my router is contected to my broadband modem (my
    > PC's share 1 internet connection). My printer and PC's are
    > connected to the LAN ports on the router (all Ethernet).
    > Everything is connected using Cat 5 patch cables. I can access
    > the internet from either PC with no problems whatsoever, I can
    > also print from either PC to the printer which is also connected
    > to the router (and not directly to a PC). However, I can not get
    > my PC's to recognise each other to perform file sharing.
    >
    > I have a VLAN set up on the router (auto-configured by SDM).
    > Windows firewall is turned off (but Norton is still enabled). I
    > have TCP/IP installed on both machines, I have both machines in
    > the same Workgroup with differenet "Machine Names" and
    > "Descriptions". I have also set up a "network share" folder
    > inside the regular windows share folder that you see when you
    > click "my computer" ("shared documents" and "documents"), I have
    > also tried sharing the whole C drive. In my network places I can
    > see my "workgroup", but when I try to open it/connect no computer
    > names are listed and I get an error message:
    >
    > "Workgroup is not accessible. You might not have permission to use
    > this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to
    > find out if you have access permissions. The list of servers for
    > this workgroup is currently unavailable."
    >
    > However I am presently running an administrator account on both
    > machines to get them set up. Do I have to set permissions for
    > something else? As far as I am aware I don't run a server either,
    > so what "list of servers" should I have?
    >
    > I can ping my router (which has an address I assigned to it) and
    > get a positive response, and I can ping my printer and get a
    > positive response, but if I try to ping either of the PC's I get a
    > "request timed out" response. I can ping each machine locally (if
    > that is the correct term) i.e ping 127.0.0.1, but if I try to ping
    > the address the VLAN has assigned to the PC (or the other PC on my
    > LAN) that is when I get a "request timed out message". I can
    > actually ping my real IP address also (the address assigned to me
    > by my ISP).
    >
    > I am a real beginner in all this so I was wondering if anyone has
    > some pointers here (would be much appreciated), is there something
    > I am missing? All I want to do is be able to do is share files
    > between two PC's on the same LAN, enabling them both to connect to
    > the internet, but not allowing machines on the internet to "file
    > share" with either of the PC's or have any other kind of access to
    > the PC's on my LAN.
    >
    > Additional Details.
    >
    > Network Connections shows the address assigned by the router's
    > VLAN, not my real IP address for each of my PC's. So for instance
    > if I gave my router the address of 74.74.74.1, my PC's & printers
    > IP's are 74.74.74.2, 74.74.74.3, & 74.74.74.4. The subnet mask is
    > 255.255.255.0, and I use DHCP to get an IP address from my ISP,
    > but usually 99.9% of the time my IP address appears to be the
    > same. IPv6 is enabled.
    >
    > Additional Questions:
    >
    > Does the IP address of my router have to be a special address
    > assigned to me by my ISP or can I chose "any" address?
    >
    > Should I have to perform additional configurations on the router
    > to enable computers on the same LAN to use file sharing? If so
    > what are they?
    >
    > -------
    > Thanks in advance
    > CB.
    >
    >
    >


    try this
    click start
    then my computer
    right click on "Shared Documents"
    Select "Sharing And Security"
    You should see a window pop up with two boxes inside. They will
    either have text, or checkboxes depending on if file sharing is
    enabled or not. You may have to click a blue link in the text to
    enable file sharing. I do not remember exactly what it says, and
    have no way of checking as all of my machines have file sharing
    enabled, but I think it says somthing to the effect of I understand
    the risks, enable file sharing. Once filesharing is enabled the
    second box allows you to share that individual file folder on the
    network and allows you to set the permissions and name for that
    folder on the network. You can also share entire drives using this
    same process. Note: sharing the entire c: drive is not recomended as
    a matter of fact windows will let you share the entire drive but
    will not let certain folders be viewed on the network in my
    experience ie. program files and windows
     
    Rosco, Dec 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. "Rosco" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns97304250885CArosco111@69.28.186.121...

    > try this
    > click start
    > then my computer
    > right click on "Shared Documents"
    > Select "Sharing And Security"
    > You should see a window pop up with two boxes inside. They will
    > either have text, or checkboxes depending on if file sharing is
    > enabled or not. You may have to click a blue link in the text to
    > enable file sharing. I do not remember exactly what it says, and
    > have no way of checking as all of my machines have file sharing
    > enabled, but I think it says somthing to the effect of I understand
    > the risks, enable file sharing. Once filesharing is enabled the
    > second box allows you to share that individual file folder on the
    > network and allows you to set the permissions and name for that
    > folder on the network. You can also share entire drives using this
    > same process. Note: sharing the entire c: drive is not recomended as
    > a matter of fact windows will let you share the entire drive but
    > will not let certain folders be viewed on the network in my
    > experience ie. program files and windows


    Thanks for your efforts to help. I have file sharing enabled on both
    computers, the "shared documents" folder is currently shared on both
    computers, i.e I haven't disabled file sharing, both folders (one on each
    machine) are available as "network shares" and "network users can change my
    files".

    -------
    Regards,
    CB
     
    Cerebral Believer, Dec 18, 2005
    #3
  4. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    Do you have the XP firewall enabled?

    If so termporarily disable and try ping test
     
    Merv, Dec 18, 2005
    #4
  5. Merv, XP firewall is disabled completly from the control panel folder, and
    "Windows Firewall".

    "Merv" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Do you have the XP firewall enabled?
    >
    > If so termporarily disable and try ping test
    >
     
    Cerebral Believer, Dec 18, 2005
    #5
  6. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    using ipconfig /all at the command prompt determine the MAC address of
    each PC's Ethernet adapter.

    rom one PC ping the other.

    Check each PC's ARP cache uisng command arp-a to see if ARP resolution
    between the two PC has occurred. Without ARP resultion, there will be
    no ping response
     
    Merv, Dec 18, 2005
    #6
  7. Merv,

    I ran the "ipconfic/all" command and I tried to ping the "physical" address
    of each PC (is this the MAC address?). I received the message "Ping request
    could not find host"

    On the arp -a command, well at first it didn't work at all, then it produced
    a reading for my printer IP address. I then pinged the PC's again, then the
    arp -a command produced a reading of IP addresses for all the devices (from
    both computers). The problem with this is the readings are not constant,
    sometimes the readings will only show for 1 device instead of 3 or 4,
    readings only tend to show for a PC after it has been pinged, and pinging
    either of the PC's still produces a "request timed out message".

    Regards,
    CB.

    "Merv" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > using ipconfig /all at the command prompt determine the MAC address of
    > each PC's Ethernet adapter.
    >
    > rom one PC ping the other.
    >
    > Check each PC's ARP cache uisng command arp-a to see if ARP resolution
    > between the two PC has occurred. Without ARP resultion, there will be
    > no ping response
    >
     
    Cerebral Believer, Dec 18, 2005
    #7
  8. news.ntlworld.com

    Larry Jones Guest

    do you have a spare hub or switch you can connect the pcs to that way you
    can rule out the router being the problem? also, do you have any other
    firewall programs like norton internet securiy or mcafee personal firewall
    ??

    "Cerebral Believer" <> wrote in message
    news:B8hpf.33801$...
    > Merv,
    >
    > I ran the "ipconfic/all" command and I tried to ping the "physical"
    > address of each PC (is this the MAC address?). I received the message
    > "Ping request could not find host"
    >
    > On the arp -a command, well at first it didn't work at all, then it
    > produced a reading for my printer IP address. I then pinged the PC's
    > again, then the arp -a command produced a reading of IP addresses for all
    > the devices (from both computers). The problem with this is the readings
    > are not constant, sometimes the readings will only show for 1 device
    > instead of 3 or 4, readings only tend to show for a PC after it has been
    > pinged, and pinging either of the PC's still produces a "request timed out
    > message".
    >
    > Regards,
    > CB.
    >
    > "Merv" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> using ipconfig /all at the command prompt determine the MAC address of
    >> each PC's Ethernet adapter.
    >>
    >> rom one PC ping the other.
    >>
    >> Check each PC's ARP cache uisng command arp-a to see if ARP resolution
    >> between the two PC has occurred. Without ARP resultion, there will be
    >> no ping response
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Larry Jones, Dec 18, 2005
    #8
  9. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    You cannot ping the physical MAC address. The MAC address identifies
    each device on an Ethernet LAN.

    Before an IP packet can be sent, the sender must obtain the MAC
    address for the destination IP address. It does this using the Address
    Resolution Protocol (ARP). It is It then uses the MAC address obtained
    to finish formatting the Ethernet frame before it puts it out on the
    "wire".

    Thus it isimportant in troubleshooting LAN connectivity issues to
    understand the role that the ARP protocol plays.

    When you issue a ping command, your PC will ARP for the destination IP
    address and when it gets an ARP reply it will cache this information.
    This is the info you see with the arp -a command. While a firewall may
    block ICMP packet (pings) they do not usually block ARP, so it is a
    good check to perform if you are having IP connectivity issues and
    pings are failing.

    Try downling IP Address Wizard and scanning your home network from one
    of your PCs
    to see what you can reach.
     
    Merv, Dec 18, 2005
    #9
  10. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    You cannot ping the physical MAC address. The MAC address identifies
    each device on an Ethernet LAN.

    Before an IP packet can be sent, the sender must obtain the MAC
    address for the destination IP address. It does this using the Address
    Resolution Protocol (ARP). It is It then uses the MAC address obtained
    to finish formatting the Ethernet frame before it puts it out on the
    "wire".

    Thus it isimportant in troubleshooting LAN connectivity issues to
    understand the role that the ARP protocol plays.

    When you issue a ping command, your PC will ARP for the destination IP
    address and when it gets an ARP reply it will cache this information.
    This is the info you see with the arp -a command. While a firewall may
    block ICMP packet (pings) they do not usually block ARP, so it is a
    good check to perform if you are having IP connectivity issues and
    pings are failing.

    Try downling IP Address Wizard and scanning your home network from one
    of your PCs
    to see what you can reach.
     
    Merv, Dec 18, 2005
    #10
  11. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    Merv, Dec 18, 2005
    #11
  12. Merv,

    Thanks for the advice on this, I downloaded the program and checked out my
    configuration. I began to be able to see my other computers listed after
    running the arp -a command (having previously entered a static address using
    arp "-s (ip address)xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (physical address)xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx").

    It turns out after all my confusion that disabling Norton Personal Firewall
    did the trick, file sharing was available straight away after I restarted
    the computers and ping & arp requests worked as expected. I turned the
    firewalls on and simply created a rule for each machine to permit
    communications with the other. I had no idea the firewall would prevent
    file sharing. Seems after all the fuss the answer was so simple? Thanks
    for putting up with a newbie.

    Regards,
    CB.

    "Merv" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here is the URL for IP Address Wizard:
    >
    > http://www.rzk.com/products/adrewiz.stm
    >
     
    Cerebral Believer, Dec 19, 2005
    #12
  13. news.ntlworld.com

    Merv Guest

    Windows file sharing uses NETBIOS over TCP/IP.

    If TCP/IP is blocked by a firewall, then file sharing will not function
    as you have discovered.
     
    Merv, Dec 19, 2005
    #13
  14. news.ntlworld.com

    CWatters Guest

    Have you set up identical user accounts on both PC? I couldn't get file
    sharing between two WinXP Pro machines to work until I did that.
     
    CWatters, Dec 21, 2005
    #14
  15. "CWatters" <> wrote in message
    news:1Qeqf.78093$-ops.be...
    > Have you set up identical user accounts on both PC? I couldn't get file
    > sharing between two WinXP Pro machines to work until I did that.


    Thanks, but the problem has been resolved now.

    -------
    Regards,
    CB.
     
    Cerebral Believer, Dec 23, 2005
    #15
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