Home network hub

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Ken@nospam.com, Nov 6, 2004.

  1. Guest

    I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.

    I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the
    internet through the cable modem.

    The operating systems on all the PC's run from Windows 98 to Windows
    XP home.

    I'm running a Linksys Wireless Router (the wireless PC's will all have
    access to the network) with a uplink to a 8 port Hub (cheapie) which
    will be the "Restricted" part of the network.

    What I want to do is add another hub that will do the split between
    restricted and unrestricted. I have read that a managed Hub will
    restrict access but I don't know which one is the best for my needs.
    I don't want to spend big money on this so what is the best way for me
    to go? Any suggestions on the brand of hub I need?

    Ken
    , Nov 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. 127.0.0.1 Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >
    > I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    > can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the
    > internet through the cable modem.
    >
    > The operating systems on all the PC's run from Windows 98 to Windows
    > XP home.
    >
    > I'm running a Linksys Wireless Router (the wireless PC's will all have
    > access to the network) with a uplink to a 8 port Hub (cheapie) which
    > will be the "Restricted" part of the network.
    >
    > What I want to do is add another hub that will do the split between
    > restricted and unrestricted. I have read that a managed Hub will
    > restrict access but I don't know which one is the best for my needs.
    > I don't want to spend big money on this so what is the best way for me
    > to go? Any suggestions on the brand of hub I need?
    >
    > Ken


    create two separate workgroups and set permissions/rights
    i can't really get more specific without seeing your network.
    no need for a separate hub.

    -a|ex
    127.0.0.1, Nov 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. why? Guest

    On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:16:35 GMT, wrote:

    >I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >
    >I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    >can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the


    What network, Internet -> local PC or local PCs not able to see other
    local PCs?

    What is the restriction requirement? For home use it's possibly not
    worth the time , effort or cost.


    The sort of thing normally used to split networks logically are -
    VLANs a switch with 802.1q support,
    Workgroups / Domains.
    IP Subnets.

    VLANs / Subnets can have a common connection point, namely a router.
    However I doubt any smaller SOHO home router will support VLANs or
    multiple subnets.

    A Netgear 24 port 10/100 Mbps Managed Switch with Gigabit Ports
    Model FSM726 and VLANs is GBP £204

    Have a look around places like , www.cisco.com lots of examples and
    documentation.

    A Cisco 1700 Series modular access router has VLAN routing, at an
    appropriate cost £550 + modules + any software required.

    >internet through the cable modem.


    >The operating systems on all the PC's run from Windows 98 to Windows
    >XP home.
    >
    >I'm running a Linksys Wireless Router (the wireless PC's will all have
    >access to the network) with a uplink to a 8 port Hub (cheapie) which
    >will be the "Restricted" part of the network.


    A Linux box running Smoothwall (Firewall) with 3 NICS divides networks.
    Have a look at the online docs, http://www.smoothwall.org/

    If you don't want it as a FW, then are other Linux based router
    projects.

    LRP is dead, but the software may still be available.

    Freesco is still going http://www.freesco.org/
    Google will turn up examples of setup and use.

    >What I want to do is add another hub that will do the split between
    >restricted and unrestricted. I have read that a managed Hub will
    >restrict access but I don't know which one is the best for my needs.


    A managed hub cots a bit extra, as a rough guide
    D-Link, 24p 10/100/1000 , cost (GBP £) 379
    while 24 managed ports costs 2019. You really need to compare the
    feature lists, some cost more for Gigabit ports, some are less without
    but still managed..

    >I don't want to spend big money on this so what is the best way for me
    >to go? Any suggestions on the brand of hub I need?


    Still with the Linux theme, there was a VLAN module at one point, so a
    box with 3 NICS, 2 to the hubs each on a VLAN and 3rd for Internet
    access sound okay.

    What I have played about with at work, is a managed switch supporting
    VLANs.

    2 VLANs 5 ports each.

    VLAN1, 2PCs and an uplink to site router.
    VLAN2, 1PC and LAN tester.

    VLAN1 both PCs can see each other and have Internet access as they share
    the common IP address range as the uplink is via the wallport to site
    LAN. VLAN2 PC has a different IP range. It can see the tester but has no
    Internet connection. What I never tried was connecting VLAN2 to the
    site network, for Internet access.


    Me
    why?, Nov 6, 2004
    #3
  4. 127.0.0.1 Guest

    "why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:16:35 GMT, wrote:
    >
    >>I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >>
    >>I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    >>can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the

    >
    > What network, Internet -> local PC or local PCs not able to see other
    > local PCs?
    >
    > What is the restriction requirement? For home use it's possibly not
    > worth the time , effort or cost.
    >
    >
    > The sort of thing normally used to split networks logically are -
    > VLANs a switch with 802.1q support,
    > Workgroups / Domains.
    > IP Subnets.
    >
    > VLANs / Subnets can have a common connection point, namely a router.
    > However I doubt any smaller SOHO home router will support VLANs or
    > multiple subnets.
    >
    > A Netgear 24 port 10/100 Mbps Managed Switch with Gigabit Ports
    > Model FSM726 and VLANs is GBP £204
    >
    > Have a look around places like , www.cisco.com lots of examples and
    > documentation.
    >
    > A Cisco 1700 Series modular access router has VLAN routing, at an
    > appropriate cost £550 + modules + any software required.
    >
    >>internet through the cable modem.

    >
    >>The operating systems on all the PC's run from Windows 98 to Windows
    >>XP home.
    >>
    >>I'm running a Linksys Wireless Router (the wireless PC's will all have
    >>access to the network) with a uplink to a 8 port Hub (cheapie) which
    >>will be the "Restricted" part of the network.

    >
    > A Linux box running Smoothwall (Firewall) with 3 NICS divides networks.
    > Have a look at the online docs, http://www.smoothwall.org/
    >
    > If you don't want it as a FW, then are other Linux based router
    > projects.
    >
    > LRP is dead, but the software may still be available.
    >
    > Freesco is still going http://www.freesco.org/
    > Google will turn up examples of setup and use.
    >
    >>What I want to do is add another hub that will do the split between
    >>restricted and unrestricted. I have read that a managed Hub will
    >>restrict access but I don't know which one is the best for my needs.

    >
    > A managed hub cots a bit extra, as a rough guide
    > D-Link, 24p 10/100/1000 , cost (GBP £) 379
    > while 24 managed ports costs 2019. You really need to compare the
    > feature lists, some cost more for Gigabit ports, some are less without
    > but still managed..
    >
    >>I don't want to spend big money on this so what is the best way for me
    >>to go? Any suggestions on the brand of hub I need?

    >
    > Still with the Linux theme, there was a VLAN module at one point, so a
    > box with 3 NICS, 2 to the hubs each on a VLAN and 3rd for Internet
    > access sound okay.
    >
    > What I have played about with at work, is a managed switch supporting
    > VLANs.
    >
    > 2 VLANs 5 ports each.
    >
    > VLAN1, 2PCs and an uplink to site router.
    > VLAN2, 1PC and LAN tester.
    >
    > VLAN1 both PCs can see each other and have Internet access as they share
    > the common IP address range as the uplink is via the wallport to site
    > LAN. VLAN2 PC has a different IP range. It can see the tester but has no
    > Internet connection. What I never tried was connecting VLAN2 to the
    > site network, for Internet access.
    >
    >
    > Me


    for a non-technical homeuser, that's an overkill...

    -a|ex
    127.0.0.1, Nov 6, 2004
    #4
  5. why? Guest

    On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 21:54:37 GMT, 127.0.0.1 wrote:

    >
    >"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:16:35 GMT, wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >>>
    >>>I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    >>>can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the

    >>
    >> What network, Internet -> local PC or local PCs not able to see other
    >> local PCs?
    >>
    >> What is the restriction requirement? For home use it's possibly not
    >> worth the time , effort or cost.


    <big snip>

    >> What I have played about with at work, is a managed switch supporting
    >> VLANs.
    >>
    >> 2 VLANs 5 ports each.
    >>
    >> VLAN1, 2PCs and an uplink to site router.
    >> VLAN2, 1PC and LAN tester.
    >>
    >> VLAN1 both PCs can see each other and have Internet access as they share
    >> the common IP address range as the uplink is via the wallport to site
    >> LAN. VLAN2 PC has a different IP range. It can see the tester but has no
    >> Internet connection. What I never tried was connecting VLAN2 to the
    >> site network, for Internet access.
    >>
    >>
    >> Me

    >
    >for a non-technical homeuser, that's an overkill...
    >
    >-a|ex
    >

    I did say that near the top :) it's partly the nature of the request.

    SOHO equipment just doesn't have the facility to logically split
    networks. Even a very simple Linux router with 3 NICS doesn't fit the
    non-technical homeuser setup, although it's far less expensive than the
    managed switch VLAN / VLAN router option.

    Me
    why?, Nov 6, 2004
    #5
  6. 127.0.0.1 Guest

    "why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 21:54:37 GMT, 127.0.0.1 wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>>
    >>> On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:16:35 GMT, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >>>>
    >>>>I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    >>>>can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the
    >>>
    >>> What network, Internet -> local PC or local PCs not able to see other
    >>> local PCs?
    >>>
    >>> What is the restriction requirement? For home use it's possibly not
    >>> worth the time , effort or cost.

    >
    > <big snip>
    >
    >>> What I have played about with at work, is a managed switch supporting
    >>> VLANs.
    >>>
    >>> 2 VLANs 5 ports each.
    >>>
    >>> VLAN1, 2PCs and an uplink to site router.
    >>> VLAN2, 1PC and LAN tester.
    >>>
    >>> VLAN1 both PCs can see each other and have Internet access as they share
    >>> the common IP address range as the uplink is via the wallport to site
    >>> LAN. VLAN2 PC has a different IP range. It can see the tester but has no
    >>> Internet connection. What I never tried was connecting VLAN2 to the
    >>> site network, for Internet access.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Me

    >>
    >>for a non-technical homeuser, that's an overkill...
    >>
    >>-a|ex
    >>

    > I did say that near the top :) it's partly the nature of the request.
    >
    > SOHO equipment just doesn't have the facility to logically split
    > networks. Even a very simple Linux router with 3 NICS doesn't fit the
    > non-technical homeuser setup, although it's far less expensive than the
    > managed switch VLAN / VLAN router option.
    >
    > Me


    simple (2) workgroups and permissions works fine for homeusers without the
    added hardware.

    -a|ex
    127.0.0.1, Nov 6, 2004
    #6
  7. Nik Schlein Guest

    I am not too sure with a wireless router/hub, but my standard wired hub. All
    I have to do is hook all the computers that I want to be restricted to one
    hub and the open ones to another hub then use sharing between the
    unrestricted and none between the others. But you should be able to do with
    anyways on one router/hub. Just don't share anything. Or install a firewall
    on the computers that won't accept certain incoming packets. Or with a port
    knock feature.


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >
    > I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    > can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the
    > internet through the cable modem.
    >
    > The operating systems on all the PC's run from Windows 98 to Windows
    > XP home.
    >
    > I'm running a Linksys Wireless Router (the wireless PC's will all have
    > access to the network) with a uplink to a 8 port Hub (cheapie) which
    > will be the "Restricted" part of the network.
    >
    > What I want to do is add another hub that will do the split between
    > restricted and unrestricted. I have read that a managed Hub will
    > restrict access but I don't know which one is the best for my needs.
    > I don't want to spend big money on this so what is the best way for me
    > to go? Any suggestions on the brand of hub I need?
    >
    > Ken
    Nik Schlein, Nov 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Guest

    On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 21:54:37 GMT, "127.0.0.1" <get.rooted@localhost>
    wrote:
    I dissagree,... First of all,.. I got a lot of good ideas from him.
    Yes,.. for the normal Home Netwrok it was a bit "Much",.. but my home
    network is far from typical. What I'm trying to do is keep my room
    mates out of my computers but still give them access to the net.

    I like the idea of tossing together a linux box and will be looking
    into that as a gateway for my "Private" network. If it works it will
    solve a lot of my problems. I was hoping to find a hub that would do
    it though for less than $200 since it would use less electricity and
    be easier to set up.

    Thanks for all the great input everyone!!!!!

    Ken22
    >>
    >>
    >> Me

    >
    >for a non-technical homeuser, that's an overkill...
    >
    >-a|ex
    >
    , Nov 8, 2004
    #8
  9. why? Guest

    On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 23:59:35 GMT, 127.0.0.1 wrote:

    >
    >"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 21:54:37 GMT, 127.0.0.1 wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>>
    >>>> On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 16:16:35 GMT, wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I have a problem and I'm hoping someone here can help.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I want to make my home network private so that only certain computers
    >>>>>can access the network yet everyone on the network can access the
    >>>>
    >>>> What network, Internet -> local PC or local PCs not able to see other
    >>>> local PCs?
    >>>>
    >>>> What is the restriction requirement? For home use it's possibly not
    >>>> worth the time , effort or cost.

    >>
    >> <big snip>
    >>
    >>>> What I have played about with at work, is a managed switch supporting
    >>>> VLANs.
    >>>>
    >>>> 2 VLANs 5 ports each.


    <snip>

    >> I did say that near the top :) it's partly the nature of the request.
    >>
    >> SOHO equipment just doesn't have the facility to logically split
    >> networks. Even a very simple Linux router with 3 NICS doesn't fit the
    >> non-technical homeuser setup, although it's far less expensive than the
    >> managed switch VLAN / VLAN router option.
    >>
    >> Me

    >
    >simple (2) workgroups and permissions works fine for homeusers without the
    >added hardware.


    Workgroups are still visible to each other, although I never needed to
    do a split using them. I do remember in early versions of Win having the
    option of different WG's and ScopeIDs.

    There IIRC registry settings to not maintain browse lists, not look for
    and not advertise self (PC).

    A very simple split is use 2 different subnets on the same wire. This
    means the 2 groups of PCs can't see each other. However again that's not
    a function of a simple SOHO broadband router. It's back to the Linux
    router type of thing.

    Me
    why?, Nov 9, 2004
    #9
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