Home Exchange 2003 setup

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    which lets say is www.xyz.com Now I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my ISP
    which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open and
    forwards to my mailserver on my router.

    My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.

    PS I have no problem sending emails.
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Feb 28, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    JaR Guest

    On Feb 28, 11:58 am, CyberEngine
    <> wrote:
    > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    > which lets say iswww.xyz.comNow I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my ISP
    > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open and
    > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    >
    > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.
    >
    > PS I have no problem sending emails.



    You need to review how DNS works, and what a dynamic IP is.

    Also, depending on your ISP, port 25 may well be blocked.
    JaR, Mar 1, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. JaR thank you for your unhelpful reply

    "JaR" wrote:

    > On Feb 28, 11:58 am, CyberEngine
    > <> wrote:
    > > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    > > which lets say iswww.xyz.comNow I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    > > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my ISP
    > > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    > > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    > > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open and
    > > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    > >
    > > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    > > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > PS I have no problem sending emails.

    >
    >
    > You need to review how DNS works, and what a dynamic IP is.
    >
    > Also, depending on your ISP, port 25 may well be blocked.
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    catwalker63 Guest

    CyberEngine piffled away vaguely:

    > JaR thank you for your unhelpful reply
    >
    > "JaR" wrote:
    >
    >> On Feb 28, 11:58 am, CyberEngine
    >> <> wrote:
    >> > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    >> > which lets say iswww.xyz.comNow I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    >> > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my ISP
    >> > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    >> > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    >> > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open and
    >> > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    >> >
    >> > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    >> > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.
    >> >
    >> > PS I have no problem sending emails.

    >>
    >>
    >> You need to review how DNS works, and what a dynamic IP is.
    >>
    >> Also, depending on your ISP, port 25 may well be blocked.
    >>
    >>


    His answer is in keeping with your incomplete setup and confused
    question.

    1) www.xyz.com is a hostname, not a domain name. And what do you mean
    by registered?

    2) Are you setting up a mail system for your own private network or one
    that is accessable for anyone to send you mail via the Internet? What
    do you mean by "everything bounces back"? Bounces back where? What are
    the error messages? Where do you see them (mail client, server, event
    logs)? You say you are having no problem sending emails -- to whom are
    you sending messages, what client are you using and what SMTP server is
    it configured to use, your Exchange server or the ISP's SMTP server??

    3) You need a static IP address. Dynamic means it could change at any
    time and invalidate your DNS records. Unless the ISP's DHCP server is
    updating your DNS records, this isn't going to work for you. Take JaR's
    actually quite helpful advice and review these topics more thoroughly
    before you embarrass yourself further.

    4) Is your ISP aware of what you are trying to do and do you have the
    type of account to allow this sort of thing? Like JaR says, they
    probably have you blocked from running your own postoffice. See this:

    http://www.postcastserver.com/help/Port_25_Blocking.aspx

    --

    Catwalker
    aka Pu$$y Feet
    BS, MCSA, MCSE
    MCNGP #43
    www.mcngp.com
    "Definitely not wearing any underwear."
    catwalker63, Mar 1, 2007
    #4
  5. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    JaR Guest

    "catwalker63" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > CyberEngine piffled away vaguely:
    >
    >> JaR thank you for your unhelpful reply
    >>
    >> "JaR" wrote:
    >>
    >>>

    >
    > His answer is in keeping with your incomplete setup and confused
    > question.
    >



    You have more patience than I, CW.
    JaR, Mar 1, 2007
    #5
  6. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >Also, depending on your ISP, port 25 may well be blocked.

    lets hope so ;-)

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Mar 1, 2007
    #6
  7. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >JaR thank you for your unhelpful reply

    thank you for being so stupid, please come again.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Mar 1, 2007
    #7
  8. **********************************************************
    Let me just clarify something, when I say dynamic IP I mean IP provided by
    my ISP that changes once every 3-4 months which is absolutely fine with me.
    **********************************************************


    1) www.xyz.com is a hostname, not a domain name. And what do you mean by
    registered?
    When I say register, I mean a purchased www.xyz.com domain name from Yahoo
    that gives me domain control account to change different settings like MX,
    CNAME and A records


    2) I am setting up my private network that runs Exchange 2003 which should
    enable anyone to send emails via Internet to my domain users. So far my
    Exchange server is able to send emails to my private users and the rest of
    the world. Private users, however can receive emails send by other users
    within my private network only. When I say bounces back I mean this error
    message whenever I try to email something to my users from outside of my
    private network using anything such as Hotmail, Gmail....

    " This is the qmail-send program at yahoo.com. I'm afraid I wasn't able to
    deliver your message to the following addresses. This is a permanent error;
    I've given up. Sorry it didn't work out. <> Sorry, I wasn't
    able to establish an SMTP connection. (#4.4.1) I'm not going to try again;
    this message has been in the queue too long. "

    My Yahoo domain control panel allows me to modify MX record which I point to
    my Exchange server mailserver.xyz.com and set A record to point to my ISP IP.

    4. I believe I already answered this question above, but let me reiterate
    myself saying, YES my ISP is aware of what I am doing and doesn't block port
    25. Again my Yahoo domain control account allows me for all sorts of record
    edits to accommodate mail hosting needs.

    Thanks again for your help catwalker63






    Are you setting up a mail system for your own private network or one
    > that is accessable for anyone to send you mail via the Internet? What
    > do you mean by "everything bounces back"? Bounces back where? What are
    > the error messages? Where do you see them (mail client, server, event
    > logs)? You say you are having no problem sending emails -- to whom are
    > you sending messages, what client are you using and what SMTP server is
    > it configured to use, your Exchange server or the ISP's SMTP server??



    "catwalker63" wrote:

    > CyberEngine piffled away vaguely:
    >
    > > JaR thank you for your unhelpful reply
    > >
    > > "JaR" wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Feb 28, 11:58 am, CyberEngine
    > >> <> wrote:
    > >> > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    > >> > which lets say iswww.xyz.comNow I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    > >> > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my ISP
    > >> > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    > >> > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    > >> > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open and
    > >> > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    > >> >
    > >> > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    > >> > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.
    > >> >
    > >> > PS I have no problem sending emails.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> You need to review how DNS works, and what a dynamic IP is.
    > >>
    > >> Also, depending on your ISP, port 25 may well be blocked.
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    > His answer is in keeping with your incomplete setup and confused
    > question.
    >
    > 1) www.xyz.com is a hostname, not a domain name. And what do you mean
    > by registered?
    >
    > 2) Are you setting up a mail system for your own private network or one
    > that is accessable for anyone to send you mail via the Internet? What
    > do you mean by "everything bounces back"? Bounces back where? What are
    > the error messages? Where do you see them (mail client, server, event
    > logs)? You say you are having no problem sending emails -- to whom are
    > you sending messages, what client are you using and what SMTP server is
    > it configured to use, your Exchange server or the ISP's SMTP server??
    >
    > 3) You need a static IP address. Dynamic means it could change at any
    > time and invalidate your DNS records. Unless the ISP's DHCP server is
    > updating your DNS records, this isn't going to work for you. Take JaR's
    > actually quite helpful advice and review these topics more thoroughly
    > before you embarrass yourself further.
    >
    > 4) Is your ISP aware of what you are trying to do and do you have the
    > type of account to allow this sort of thing? Like JaR says, they
    > probably have you blocked from running your own postoffice. See this:
    >
    > http://www.postcastserver.com/help/Port_25_Blocking.aspx
    >
    > --
    >
    > Catwalker
    > aka Pu$$y Feet
    > BS, MCSA, MCSE
    > MCNGP #43
    > www.mcngp.com
    > "Definitely not wearing any underwear."
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #8
  9. "CyberEngine" wrote:

    >
    > **********************************************************
    > Let me just clarify something, when I say dynamic IP I mean IP provided by
    > my ISP that changes once every 3-4 months which is absolutely fine with me.
    > **********************************************************


    No that is not fine and that is where your problem starts. You can send
    email out to outside world because your system doesn't care what IP address
    you have at your router. However if the recepient's spam filter has the DNS
    reverse turned on, your email will be dropped dead right there because your
    registered DNS name doesn't match with the IP address. Outside users can not
    send mail to you (and I believe you can't even receive any mail from the
    outside as well) because your A record doesn't match with the IP at your
    router which is changed time to time. Let's say you mail server is
    mail.server.com and the A record points to this IP 70.120.134.15. If you
    were using a static IP address which should be 70.1120.134.15 at your router,
    then any mail servers can contact your mail server without any problem.
    However as you have said, you are using dynamic IP which you know as well
    will be changed time to time. Then how in the world other mail servers can
    connect to your mail server? You may question that then how come I can send
    email to my internal users? Well, because they are in the same subnet and
    domain. If this explanation is still not clear to you then let me take you
    through another real life example. Let's say you were living in 1234 West
    Drive, Houston, TX. About a month later, you moved to 1036 West Drive,
    Houston, TX. Now there is a packet that sent to you using your old address
    from some one in OH. Would you be able to receive the packet at the new
    address?
    =?Utf-8?B?RHJhZ29uIFdpdGhvdXQgV2luZ3M=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #9
  10. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    BD[MCNGP] Guest

    "Dragon Without Wings" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "CyberEngine" wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> **********************************************************
    >> Let me just clarify something, when I say dynamic IP I mean IP provided by
    >> my ISP that changes once every 3-4 months which is absolutely fine with me.
    >> **********************************************************

    >
    > No that is not fine and that is where your problem starts. You can send
    > email out to outside world because your system doesn't care what IP address
    > you have at your router. However if the recepient's spam filter has the DNS
    > reverse turned on, your email will be dropped dead right there because your
    > registered DNS name doesn't match with the IP address. Outside users can not
    > send mail to you (and I believe you can't even receive any mail from the
    > outside as well) because your A record doesn't match with the IP at your
    > router which is changed time to time. Let's say you mail server is
    > mail.server.com and the A record points to this IP 70.120.134.15. If you
    > were using a static IP address which should be 70.1120.134.15 at your router,
    > then any mail servers can contact your mail server without any problem.
    > However as you have said, you are using dynamic IP which you know as well
    > will be changed time to time. Then how in the world other mail servers can
    > connect to your mail server? You may question that then how come I can send
    > email to my internal users? Well, because they are in the same subnet and
    > domain. If this explanation is still not clear to you then let me take you
    > through another real life example. Let's say you were living in 1234 West
    > Drive, Houston, TX. About a month later, you moved to 1036 West Drive,
    > Houston, TX. Now there is a packet that sent to you using your old address
    > from some one in OH. Would you be able to receive the packet at the new
    > address?
    >
    >

    You may have covered this, but I wanted to reiterate. Many companies nowadays do
    not even accept email from servers that don't have a Static IP Address. Because
    of the vast amounts of SPAM out there already, people have found ways to cut
    down on it, and one way is to only allow email from IPs that are Static. No time
    to look it up now, but IIRC, it has something to do with a code or something in
    the 'signature' of a static IP address.


    --
    BD
    # 0011 ^ 2
    BD[MCNGP], Mar 1, 2007
    #10
  11. Dragon, I understand all about dynamic vs static IP issues, all I need is to
    have it working for those 3-4 months and then let it go. My issue is not
    about what kind of IP I use, but somewhere in my DNS configuration.


    "Dragon Without Wings" wrote:

    > "CyberEngine" wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > **********************************************************
    > > Let me just clarify something, when I say dynamic IP I mean IP provided by
    > > my ISP that changes once every 3-4 months which is absolutely fine with me.
    > > **********************************************************

    >
    > No that is not fine and that is where your problem starts. You can send
    > email out to outside world because your system doesn't care what IP address
    > you have at your router. However if the recepient's spam filter has the DNS
    > reverse turned on, your email will be dropped dead right there because your
    > registered DNS name doesn't match with the IP address. Outside users can not
    > send mail to you (and I believe you can't even receive any mail from the
    > outside as well) because your A record doesn't match with the IP at your
    > router which is changed time to time. Let's say you mail server is
    > mail.server.com and the A record points to this IP 70.120.134.15. If you
    > were using a static IP address which should be 70.1120.134.15 at your router,
    > then any mail servers can contact your mail server without any problem.
    > However as you have said, you are using dynamic IP which you know as well
    > will be changed time to time. Then how in the world other mail servers can
    > connect to your mail server? You may question that then how come I can send
    > email to my internal users? Well, because they are in the same subnet and
    > domain. If this explanation is still not clear to you then let me take you
    > through another real life example. Let's say you were living in 1234 West
    > Drive, Houston, TX. About a month later, you moved to 1036 West Drive,
    > Houston, TX. Now there is a packet that sent to you using your old address
    > from some one in OH. Would you be able to receive the packet at the new
    > address?
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #11
  12. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    JaR Guest

    "BD[MCNGP]" <...---...> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > You may have covered this, but I wanted to reiterate. Many companies
    > nowadays do not even accept email from servers that don't have a Static IP
    > Address. Because of the vast amounts of SPAM out there already, people
    > have found ways to cut down on it, and one way is to only allow email from
    > IPs that are Static. No time to look it up now, but IIRC, it has something
    > to do with a code or something in the 'signature' of a static IP address.
    >


    Most ISPs use blocklists to filter spam. They list ranges that contain
    anything from known spam producing areas of the internet, to ranges that are
    known to be used for dynamic IPs and will not relay or accept mail from them
    as a good proportion of the SMTP traffic coming out of them is from pwned
    machines spewing spam. A lot of mail servers are configured these days to
    refuse any mail that resolves to an MX record that does not have a valid
    reverse DNS as well.

    --
    JaR
    Suffering Fools Gladly
    JaR, Mar 1, 2007
    #12
  13. "CyberEngine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    > which lets say is www.xyz.com Now I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my
    > ISP
    > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open
    > and
    > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    >
    > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.


    Have you tried telnet'ing to port 25 on your (current) IP address, both from
    inside and from outside your LAN? That should help narrow down whether the
    problem is routing or dns.

    If you can telnet to port 25 from outside, can you manually engage in an
    SMTP conversation with your server (HELO, etc.)?
    Michael D. Hensley, Mar 1, 2007
    #13
  14. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >Most ISPs use blocklists to filter spam. They list ranges that contain
    >anything from known spam producing areas of the internet


    in other words block everything sent from addresses under the
    authority of apnic.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Mar 1, 2007
    #14
  15. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    Guest Guest

    "Kline Sphere" <.@> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >Most ISPs use blocklists to filter spam. They list ranges that contain
    >>anything from known spam producing areas of the internet

    >
    > in other words block everything sent from addresses under the
    > authority of apnic.
    >

    might as well block ripe, arin, lacnic, and internic as well....h3ll with it,
    just block anything IANA related, you'll be fine. ;)


    --
    BD
    # 0011 ^ 2
    Guest, Mar 1, 2007
    #15
  16. "CyberEngine" wrote:

    > Dragon, I understand all about dynamic vs static IP issues, all I need is to
    > have it working for those 3-4 months and then let it go. My issue is not
    > about what kind of IP I use, but somewhere in my DNS configuration.


    OK then. First, are you sure your IP address is staying the same for at
    least 3 months? If yes, then do you have any type of firewall between your
    Exchange and your interntet router? Port 25 shouldn't be blocked for incoming
    traffic. Last but not least, did you configure your Exchange SMTP virtual
    server to use the public DNS name mailserver.xyz.com (I should have stated
    this earlier)?
    =?Utf-8?B?RHJhZ29uIFdpdGhvdXQgV2luZ3M=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #16
  17. =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=

    JaR Guest

    <CertGuard> wrote in message news:...
    >
    >
    > "Kline Sphere" <.@> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> >Most ISPs use blocklists to filter spam. They list ranges that contain
    >>>anything from known spam producing areas of the internet

    >>
    >> in other words block everything sent from addresses under the
    >> authority of apnic.
    >>

    > might as well block ripe, arin, lacnic, and internic as well....h3ll with
    > it, just block anything IANA related, you'll be fine. ;)
    >
    >
    > --
    > BD
    > # 0011 ^ 2



    Works for me!

    --
    JaR
    Suffering Fools Gladly
    JaR, Mar 1, 2007
    #17
  18. Michael, I can only telnet within my subnet and engage into SMTP server
    conversation. I however can not telnet to mailserver.xyz.com 25 from outside.
    This like you said is either DNS or routing issue, which I am trying to
    figure out.
    THanks

    "Michael D. Hensley" wrote:

    > "CyberEngine" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Here is my deal: I setup my home domain and registered my own domain name
    > > which lets say is www.xyz.com Now I am trying to setup my Exchange 2003
    > > server so I can send and receive emails. I am using a dynamic IP from my
    > > ISP
    > > which let say is 68.68.68.60 My home server FQDN is let say
    > > mailserver.xyz.com My A record is setup as mailserver.xyz.com --->
    > > 68.68.68.60 and MX is also setup with highest priority. Port 25 is open
    > > and
    > > forwards to my mailserver on my router.
    > >
    > > My issue is that I can not receive any emails that are being sent to
    > > everything bounces back. Any help would be appreciated.

    >
    > Have you tried telnet'ing to port 25 on your (current) IP address, both from
    > inside and from outside your LAN? That should help narrow down whether the
    > problem is routing or dns.
    >
    > If you can telnet to port 25 from outside, can you manually engage in an
    > SMTP conversation with your server (HELO, etc.)?
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #18
  19. Yes I am sure it is static for 3 months and I have Lynksis router only that
    uses NAT. On that router I have port 80 open for hosting my website and port
    25 that forwards SMTP traffic. Default Virtual SMTP server is set to my
    private static IP as that the only option I get. Could this mess things up?


    "Dragon Without Wings" wrote:

    > "CyberEngine" wrote:
    >
    > > Dragon, I understand all about dynamic vs static IP issues, all I need is to
    > > have it working for those 3-4 months and then let it go. My issue is not
    > > about what kind of IP I use, but somewhere in my DNS configuration.

    >
    > OK then. First, are you sure your IP address is staying the same for at
    > least 3 months? If yes, then do you have any type of firewall between your
    > Exchange and your interntet router? Port 25 shouldn't be blocked for incoming
    > traffic. Last but not least, did you configure your Exchange SMTP virtual
    > server to use the public DNS name mailserver.xyz.com (I should have stated
    > this earlier)?
    =?Utf-8?B?Q3liZXJFbmdpbmU=?=, Mar 1, 2007
    #19
  20. "CyberEngine" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Michael, I can only telnet within my subnet and engage into SMTP server
    > conversation. I however can not telnet to mailserver.xyz.com 25 from
    > outside.
    > This like you said is either DNS or routing issue, which I am trying to
    > figure out.


    If you can't telnet to port 25 on your server by IP address, it's clearly
    NOT a DNS issue (if you specify the IP address, DNS isn't involved). If
    that's the case, the next step is to figure out where the data is being
    blocked.

    I can think of a few things to try:

    a) temporarily remove all firewalls/routers that you can between your
    Exchange server and the Internet, and see if you can telnet to port 25 (by
    IP address);

    b) physically move the Exchange server to another location (so you are using
    a different Internet connection) and try to telnet to port 25 (by the new IP
    address);

    c) put a packet sniffer on your LAN, and see if the telnet-to-port-25
    packets are making it past your Internet router.

    Good luck!

    (This is probably the wrong newsgroup for this discussion, but what the
    heck -- there's not much else going in here.)
    Michael D. Hensley, Mar 2, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?VG9tIERpZw==?=

    Help with Server 2003 x64 and Exchange 2003 install - deploy block

    =?Utf-8?B?VG9tIERpZw==?=, Mar 20, 2006, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,012
    Charlie Russel - MVP
    Mar 20, 2006
  2. Miguel Jamous

    Outlook 2003 + Exchange 2003

    Miguel Jamous, Jul 4, 2006, in forum: Windows 64bit
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    679
    Charlie Russel - MVP
    Jul 4, 2006
  3. =?Utf-8?B?am9zdWU=?=
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    967
    =?Utf-8?B?U2xpY2tERFNB?=
    Aug 15, 2007
  4. Juan
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,111
  5. Dev

    I want ms exchange server 2003 setup / iso .

    Dev, Aug 4, 2009, in forum: Microsoft Certification
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    12,880
    Santhosh Sivarajan
    Aug 6, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page