home computer password

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Thad Sobota, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. Thad Sobota

    Thad Sobota Guest

    I have a desktop running windows 98se. Is there any way to keep somebody
    else in the house from using the computer, such as a hard drive password or
    other password setup?
     
    Thad Sobota, Nov 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. Thad Sobota

    Thad Sobota Guest

    Oh, Sweet!!!!
    Found it and yes, it worked!

    Thanks Imhotep!

    "Imhotep" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thad Sobota wrote:
    >
    > > I have a desktop running windows 98se. Is there any way to keep somebody
    > > else in the house from using the computer, such as a hard drive password
    > > or other password setup?

    >
    > how about a bios password?
    >
    > im
     
    Thad Sobota, Nov 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Thad Sobota

    Imhotep Guest

    Thad Sobota wrote:

    > I have a desktop running windows 98se. Is there any way to keep somebody
    > else in the house from using the computer, such as a hard drive password
    > or other password setup?


    how about a bios password?

    im
     
    Imhotep, Nov 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Thad Sobota

    Imhotep Guest

    Thad Sobota wrote:

    > Oh, Sweet!!!!
    > Found it and yes, it worked!
    >
    > Thanks Imhotep!
    >
    > "Imhotep" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Thad Sobota wrote:
    >>
    >> > I have a desktop running windows 98se. Is there any way to keep
    >> > somebody else in the house from using the computer, such as a hard
    >> > drive password or other password setup?

    >>
    >> how about a bios password?
    >>
    >> im


    ....sure anytime.

    Im
     
    Imhotep, Nov 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Thad Sobota

    thunderbird Guest

    Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may
    cost something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.
     
    thunderbird, Nov 27, 2005
    #5
  6. Thad Sobota

    Jim Watt Guest

    On Sun, 27 Nov 2005 10:33:45 -0700, "Thad Sobota" <>
    wrote:

    >I have a desktop running windows 98se. Is there any way to keep somebody
    >else in the house from using the computer, such as a hard drive password or
    >other password setup?


    You should have the option of setting a BIOS password, which is the
    best it gets with that kind of setup.

    Press the appropriate keys during startup to enter the setup options
    and look for those related to password, and set one. Don't forget
    what you entered the next day and you will need it to start the
    machine thereafter.
    --
    Jim Watt
    http://www.gibnet.com
     
    Jim Watt, Nov 27, 2005
    #6
  7. thunderbird wrote:

    > Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may cost
    > something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.


    What a load of TOTAL BULLSHIT!

    Almost ALL BIOS passwords can be bypassed by resetting to default with a
    jumper, or battery removal. The number of machines that CAN'T be fixed
    this way is so small it's nonexistent in the real world.

    You scam artists at Privacy.LIE might charge $300 to do a trivial 10
    minute job, but those of us who run HONEST businesses do it for free, or a
    very nominal fee. It's like plugging in RAM. You usually do it just for
    the advertisement value of knowing that when the person has a real problem
    or wants some new toys they'll be back, and recommend you to other people
    with real problems and needs.

    I'm sure this sort of integrity, common sense, and knowledge of simple
    tech skills is something you and your species knows nothing about. So why
    are you posting your uninformed idiocy in this group?
     
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Nov 27, 2005
    #7
  8. Thad Sobota

    pickluh Guest

    The world needs a few more techs with your mindset Borked...Its also
    funny listening to other techs rattle off lines of utter BS not
    expecting the person they're talking to to know their butt from a hole
    in the ground.
     
    pickluh, Nov 28, 2005
    #8
  9. "thunderbird" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may
    > cost something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.
    >

    Yeah right - just pop the battery off the mobo - or even just adjust that
    little clear cmos jumper is enough on most boards to circumvent bios
    passwords

    TpwUK
     
    Martin Spencer-Ford, Nov 28, 2005
    #9
  10. "Borked Pseudo Mailed" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > thunderbird wrote:
    >
    >> Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may cost
    >> something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.

    >
    > What a load of TOTAL BULLSHIT!
    >
    > Almost ALL BIOS passwords can be bypassed by resetting to default with a
    > jumper, or battery removal. The number of machines that CAN'T be fixed
    > this way is so small it's nonexistent in the real world.
    >
    > You scam artists at Privacy.LIE might charge $300 to do a trivial 10
    > minute job, but those of us who run HONEST businesses do it for free, or a
    > very nominal fee. It's like plugging in RAM. You usually do it just for
    > the advertisement value of knowing that when the person has a real problem
    > or wants some new toys they'll be back, and recommend you to other people
    > with real problems and needs.
    >
    > I'm sure this sort of integrity, common sense, and knowledge of simple
    > tech skills is something you and your species knows nothing about. So why
    > are you posting your uninformed idiocy in this group?
    >

    I wish i had read this far before posting now - well said Borked!

    TpwUK
     
    Martin Spencer-Ford, Nov 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Thad Sobota

    Jim Watt Guest

    On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 23:35:33 GMT, "Martin Spencer-Ford"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >"Borked Pseudo Mailed" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> thunderbird wrote:
    >>
    >>> Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may cost
    >>> something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.

    >>
    >> What a load of TOTAL BULLSHIT!
    >>
    >> Almost ALL BIOS passwords can be bypassed by resetting to default with a
    >> jumper, or battery removal. The number of machines that CAN'T be fixed
    >> this way is so small it's nonexistent in the real world.
    >>
    >> You scam artists at Privacy.LIE might charge $300 to do a trivial 10
    >> minute job, but those of us who run HONEST businesses do it for free, or a
    >> very nominal fee. It's like plugging in RAM. You usually do it just for
    >> the advertisement value of knowing that when the person has a real problem
    >> or wants some new toys they'll be back, and recommend you to other people
    >> with real problems and needs.
    >>
    >> I'm sure this sort of integrity, common sense, and knowledge of simple
    >> tech skills is something you and your species knows nothing about. So why
    >> are you posting your uninformed idiocy in this group?
    >>

    >I wish i had read this far before posting now - well said Borked!


    I disagree.

    All security involves a trade off between preventing access and
    inconveniencing the genuine user. Further all security can be
    bypassed, its just that some is harder and costlier than others.
    Further, security also is about letting you know your system has
    been compromised.

    In a domestic environment setting a BIOS password is a reasonable
    measure, its unlikely that anyone will remove the CMOS battery to
    reset the machine, and if they do, it is obvious because the password
    will no longer work. Many machines allow for a small padlock to
    secure the case against this happening.

    The advice about not losing the password is good advice, and
    generally people who undertake work for free are either fools or
    worth every penny you pay. I certainly would charge a client a
    minimum callout charge for removing a password. time is money.

    As for 'the number of machines that can't be fixed being small'
    there are a lot of laptops out there and resetting the cmos password
    on them is non trivial nor is getting into the case of many.

    For the OP its the correct solution, so why complicate life ?
    --
    Jim Watt
    http://www.gibnet.com
     
    Jim Watt, Nov 29, 2005
    #11
  12. Jim Watt wrote:

    > On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 23:35:33 GMT, "Martin Spencer-Ford"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"Borked Pseudo Mailed" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> thunderbird wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Just don't loose the password, a good tech can re-set it but it may
    >>>> cost something like $300. Bios passwords aren't that easy to by-pass.
    >>>
    >>> What a load of TOTAL BULLSHIT!
    >>>
    >>> Almost ALL BIOS passwords can be bypassed by resetting to default with
    >>> a jumper, or battery removal. The number of machines that CAN'T be
    >>> fixed this way is so small it's nonexistent in the real world.
    >>>
    >>> You scam artists at Privacy.LIE might charge $300 to do a trivial 10
    >>> minute job, but those of us who run HONEST businesses do it for free,
    >>> or a very nominal fee. It's like plugging in RAM. You usually do it
    >>> just for the advertisement value of knowing that when the person has a
    >>> real problem or wants some new toys they'll be back, and recommend you
    >>> to other people with real problems and needs.
    >>>
    >>> I'm sure this sort of integrity, common sense, and knowledge of simple
    >>> tech skills is something you and your species knows nothing about. So
    >>> why are you posting your uninformed idiocy in this group?
    >>>

    >>I wish i had read this far before posting now - well said Borked!

    >
    > I disagree.
    >
    > All security involves a trade off between preventing access and
    > inconveniencing the genuine user. Further all security can be bypassed,
    > its just that some is harder and costlier than others. Further, security
    > also is about letting you know your system has been compromised.
    >
    > In a domestic environment setting a BIOS password is a reasonable measure,
    > its unlikely that anyone will remove the CMOS battery to reset the
    > machine, and if they do, it is obvious because the password will no longer
    > work. Many machines allow for a small padlock to secure the case against
    > this happening.


    Who said anything about a BIOS password being unreasonable? It's fine if
    you want to keep your technically challenged family members out of your
    machine.

    The problem was some moron saying it would cost $300 to fix if you forgot
    the password.

    >
    > The advice about not losing the password is good advice, and generally


    Malarkey! Not loosing your passwords is a nobrainer, but the FUDding
    idiocy about what might happen if you do spread by SOME grossly
    incompetent fools deserves to be dealt with accordingly.

    > people who undertake work for free are either fools or worth every penny
    > you pay. I certainly would charge a client a minimum callout charge for
    > removing a password. time is money.


    People who do trivial jobs for nothing or a very nominal fee are the ones
    other people come back to time and time again. Only wannabes who are
    desperate for every dime because they're too incompetent to build up any
    sort of loyal customer base charge for cracking a case and moving a jumper
    or plugging in RAM. Or "puppy mill" techs working for Best Buy who don't
    have a choice.

    >
    > As for 'the number of machines that can't be fixed being small' there
    > are a lot of laptops out there and resetting the cmos password on them
    > is non trivial nor is getting into the case of many.


    Maybe for you. Not so much so for experienced techs who have popped open a
    few hundred. Maybe a thousand? Who the hell can count 20 years worth?

    >
    > For the OP its the correct solution, so why complicate life ? -- Jim
    > Watt
    > http://www.gibnet.com
     
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Nov 29, 2005
    #12
  13. Thad Sobota

    AV Guest

    I think people in general tend to become more aggressive in online
    conversations than in real life. Still I think it is good to think twice
    and try to behave and treat others with respect, even though they (and
    probably most of us) say or write something not correct sometimes due to
    that fact that we didn't know better.

    I have noticed myself that I sometimes can tend to become more irritated
    in online discussions when people say things I think is very stupid - or
    even more commonly that they don't understand a bit what I try to say.

    Just some thoughts of mine.
     
    AV, Dec 3, 2005
    #13
  14. Thad Sobota

    TwistyCreek Guest

    AV wrote:

    > I think people in general tend to become more aggressive in online
    > conversations than in real life. Still I think it is good to think twice


    You really think people grow big balls when they're hiding behind their
    keyboards?

    Impossible! <grin>

    > and try to behave and treat others with respect, even though they (and
    > probably most of us) say or write something not correct sometimes due to
    > that fact that we didn't know better.
    >
    > I have noticed myself that I sometimes can tend to become more irritated
    > in online discussions when people say things I think is very stupid - or
    > even more commonly that they don't understand a bit what I try to say.
    >
    > Just some thoughts of mine.


    Very good advice. Well stated. :)
     
    TwistyCreek, Dec 3, 2005
    #14
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