Hockey Rink photos - Help

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Steve Edwards, Dec 30, 2003.

  1. We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    performance in a hockey rink.

    Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.

    thanks

    Steve
     
    Steve Edwards, Dec 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Steve Edwards

    Cello Guest

    What kind of lens are you using? Settings depend on the lens...need more
    info.
    "Steve Edwards" <> wrote in message
    news:V86Ib.93397$...
    > We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    > performance in a hockey rink.
    >
    > Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
    >
    > thanks
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >
     
    Cello, Dec 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Steve Edwards

    Chip Gallo Guest

    Cello wrote:
    > What kind of lens are you using? Settings depend on the lens...need
    > more info.
    > "Steve Edwards" <> wrote in message
    > news:V86Ib.93397$...
    >> We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    >> performance in a hockey rink.
    >>
    >> Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
    >>
    >> thanks
    >>
    >> Steve


    Also the white balance needs to be done manually. Most rinks use a mix of
    different temperature lights. I've been using Warmcards with my Sony F717 to
    get a more pleasing skin tone.

    Good luck and post some examples (along with your lens info).

    Chip Gallo
     
    Chip Gallo, Dec 30, 2003
    #3
  4. Nikon Nikor 35mm-135mm AF.

    Steve

    "Cello" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What kind of lens are you using? Settings depend on the lens...need more
    > info.
    > "Steve Edwards" <> wrote in message
    > news:V86Ib.93397$...
    > > We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    > > performance in a hockey rink.
    > >
    > > Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
    > >
    > > thanks
    > >
    > > Steve
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Steve Edwards, Dec 30, 2003
    #4
  5. Steve Edwards

    Johnny Guest

    Not specific to the D100, but try the following (refer to your manual
    for specific instructions on how to make the changes):

    1) Use custom white balance. If all else fails, use the ice or boards
    as your reference. This will fix (or reduce) the yellow color cast.

    2) Use 800 ISO (experiment with 400 and 1600). You don't mention if
    you're in an amateur, "junior pro"/major college (AHL, CHL), or NHL
    rink, so your lighting could be anywhere form bad to good.

    3) Either get as close to the glass as possible, or get up high enough
    to shoot over the glass. Either way, don't use a flash.

    4) Set your exposure compensation to +1. You might need to go higher,
    you might need to go less. (this will reduce/eliminate the dark
    pictures)

    5) Shoot from the corner of the rink to get the best shots. Get in the
    Zamboni pit if possible. Get on the good side of the team or league
    personnel and shoot from the penalty box (if it doesn't have glass --
    don't forget to duck)

    6) Shoot *A LOT* of pictures. You'll get some great ones, some good
    ones, and a lot of bad ones.

    7) Generally speaking, fights aren't interesting pictures (unless you
    get a fist connecting), just a bunch of guys standing around.

    8) Don't forget to shoot behind the play. A lot of good checks happen
    behind the play.

    Samples using the above tips can be seen at:
    http://www.ushl.com/gallery/

    John Elftmann



    > We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    > performance in a hockey rink.
    >
    > Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
     
    Johnny, Dec 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Steve Edwards

    Viper Guest

    Johnny - the site and your photos are awesome. I just got a Digital Rebel
    and a 28-135 IS USM 3.5-5.6 Canon lens. I would love to take shots of my
    son's basketball team anywhere close to what you did here.

    When I put the dReb on 800 ISO I get very dark photos, even in a nicely lit
    gym. I'll try the exp comp of +1 and Custom WB. Is this lens good enough to
    shoot these shots? Would a 2.8 70-300 lens be better? Is there that much
    difference between a 3.5 and 2.8 appature setting?

    Would appreciate any advice...

    Doug

    "Johnny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not specific to the D100, but try the following (refer to your manual
    > for specific instructions on how to make the changes):
    >
    > 1) Use custom white balance. If all else fails, use the ice or boards
    > as your reference. This will fix (or reduce) the yellow color cast.
    >
    > 2) Use 800 ISO (experiment with 400 and 1600). You don't mention if
    > you're in an amateur, "junior pro"/major college (AHL, CHL), or NHL
    > rink, so your lighting could be anywhere form bad to good.
    >
    > 3) Either get as close to the glass as possible, or get up high enough
    > to shoot over the glass. Either way, don't use a flash.
    >
    > 4) Set your exposure compensation to +1. You might need to go higher,
    > you might need to go less. (this will reduce/eliminate the dark
    > pictures)
    >
    > 5) Shoot from the corner of the rink to get the best shots. Get in the
    > Zamboni pit if possible. Get on the good side of the team or league
    > personnel and shoot from the penalty box (if it doesn't have glass --
    > don't forget to duck)
    >
    > 6) Shoot *A LOT* of pictures. You'll get some great ones, some good
    > ones, and a lot of bad ones.
    >
    > 7) Generally speaking, fights aren't interesting pictures (unless you
    > get a fist connecting), just a bunch of guys standing around.
    >
    > 8) Don't forget to shoot behind the play. A lot of good checks happen
    > behind the play.
    >
    > Samples using the above tips can be seen at:
    > http://www.ushl.com/gallery/
    >
    > John Elftmann
    >
    >
    >
    > > We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    > > performance in a hockey rink.
    > >
    > > Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
     
    Viper, Dec 31, 2003
    #6
  7. Steve Edwards

    Johnny Guest

    Thanks for the compliements. I haven't shot basketball, I dedicate *a
    lot* of time to hockey (photo & web site) from September - May.

    I don't have personal experience with the dRebel or the 28-135 IS lens
    (have considered purchasing the lens), but keep in mind that the f stop
    is 3.5 at the wide (28mm) end of the zoom and 5.6 at the narrow (135mm)
    end of the zoom. I'm going to assume you're mostly shooting at 135 or
    close to it, and there is considerable difference between 5.6 and 2.8.

    Before purchasing new equipment, try the following:

    1) set your ISO to 800

    2) put your camera in Aperture Priority (AV) mode.

    3) set the aperature to as wide as possible (3.5 at 28mm, 5.6 at 135mm).
    Refer to your manual for instructions on how to do this.

    4) you mention your pictures are dark, so try setting your exposure
    compensation to +.5 or +1 (experiement). Refer to your manual for
    instructions on how to do this.

    Shoot a game with the above settings. While shooting (or when you get
    home), review your camera settings. Your ISO should be 800 in all shots
    and your aperture should be 5.6 if at 135mm, or close to 5.6 if not
    quite at 135mm (or 3.5 if at 28mm). What was your shutter speed? You
    probably don't want anything less than 1/125; ideally you don't really
    want slower than 1/200.

    If you're still getting unacceptable shots, try setting your ISO to
    1600. Keep in mind that you will get grainier shots at 1600. If you're
    still not happy, it's time to consider a new (to you) lens. There's
    nothing wrong with used equipment, and bargains can be found. I've
    never bought anything on E-Bay, but there are probably some there. B&H
    Photo (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/) is highly regarded by many
    photographers and has a good used section; all items are fairly rated on
    a 10-point scale. I've purchased quite a bit of equipment from B&H, and
    have made a couple of returns without any problems (used & new
    equipment). Back to the lens. If you're still getting unacceptable
    shots with the 28-135 and want good quality but don't need professional
    quality images, consider Sigma's 70-200 2.8. It's 2.8 throughout the
    zoom range, and is what I used in almost all of the hockey shots that
    you saw. At $740 (at B&H) it's not cheap, but is considerably cheaper
    than Canon's alternative which runs $1,090 (but it is an "L" lens).

    If you're getting close enough at the 135mm end of your zoom and are
    zooming to 135 in most of your shots, you may want to consider a prime
    lens which can be cheaper than the zoom and will frequently give better
    quality pictures. If you can make do with a 100mm lens, Canon offers a
    100mm 2.0 for about $380 (B&H); or a 200mm 2.8 L for $630.

    Hope this helps...

    John


    > Johnny - the site and your photos are awesome. I just got a Digital Rebel
    > and a 28-135 IS USM 3.5-5.6 Canon lens. I would love to take shots of my
    > son's basketball team anywhere close to what you did here.
    >
    > When I put the dReb on 800 ISO I get very dark photos, even in a nicely lit
    > gym. I'll try the exp comp of +1 and Custom WB. Is this lens good enough to
    > shoot these shots? Would a 2.8 70-300 lens be better? Is there that much
    > difference between a 3.5 and 2.8 appature setting?
    >
    > Would appreciate any advice...
    >
    > Doug
     
    Johnny, Dec 31, 2003
    #7
  8. Steve Edwards

    WMAS 1960 Guest

    Don't know about the D-Rebel(?), if it has this but since the original post
    mentioned the D100, Something specific to the D100 that might be of help is
    this. If it is available on the Rebel, There is a setting on the D100 called
    "Auto ISO" or something like that.

    First, personally, I would use Shutter Priority rather than Aperature Priority
    because I think your shutter speed is a little more crucial than your
    aperature. I would agree with your statement that you wouldn't want to go
    below 1/200th if you can avoid it. Actually from my experiences I prefer
    1/400th if possible and no less than 1/250th. Anyways, however you set,
    Aperature Priority or Shutter Priority, go into your menu and set "Auto ISO" to
    ON. What happens here is that you will select your settings, either f/2.8, 3.5
    or 5.6, or 1/250th or 1/400th. Then the camera will attempt to set the
    opposite aperature or shutter setting to accomodate your choices. Using the
    ISO setting on the dial on the left of your camera, select 800 or 400 ISO to
    start with, if you think the rink is exceptionally well lit. That way the
    camera will,

    1.) set for 400 or 800 ISO. (whichever you selected).
    2.) (for the sake of example here) set to f/3.5, if that was your choice.
    3.) set the shutter speed to the maximum (fastest) allowable to accomodate your
    f/3.5 aperature.

    Then, if the camera can NOT accomodate your settings it will, AUTOMATICALLY, up
    the ISO setting to try and accomodate YOUR specifications.

    While writing this, and thinking about it, more reason here to use "Shutter
    Priority" over Aperature Priority. With Aperature Priority, your camera has a
    lot of latitude to set your shutter to as slow as 1/60th of a second or slower
    to accomodate your aperature setting. This could yield you with motion blur
    like you have never seen. By using Shutter Priority you will be setting a
    prefered shutter speed and your lens will max out at it's widest aperature
    setting to attempt to accomodate you. That will force the camera, if the
    aperature isn't sufficient, into using Auto ISO, to up the ISO setting from 400
    to 800 to 1600, whatever is needed. That way your shutter speed will not be
    too low, your aperature will be maxed out and the ISO will be at maximum
    REQUIRED to yield you your results. All this is assuming the rink you are
    shooting at is adequately lit for you to photograph in.

    I am reading this thread with great interest myself because I have a D100 also
    and have been using it for a lot of hockey lately. I have had mixed results
    myself since one rink I shot at was relatively well lit and the one that I shot
    at a few weeks ago was horrible. I shot 7 games and over 700 pictures that
    Saturday afternoon and am currently editing them. The amount of enhancement
    and correction that I have to make to color and exposure is getting
    frustrating. Plus, my pictures are no match to the ones that you(?) posted.
    Yours are very nice.

    For my experience, I shot at MANUAL and set the shutter and aperature myself
    taking the brightness of the ice into consideration. I also whitebalanced on a
    piece of gray foamboard that I got at my local Officemax. I then set the
    aperature and shutter and shot a bunch of test shots pre-game. They looked
    good so I started shooting at the drop of the puck. With all the settings you
    would think all my pictures would be the same. However for some reason they
    ranged from too dark to really nice and from redish to bluish to just right. I
    think it might have to do with the types of lights which might, like
    flourescent tubes, oscillate or cycle at a frequency (rate) that we don't
    percieve with our eyes but that can be captured with a faster shutter speed.
    Maybe there is a shutter speed limit here that might need to be considered?
    Add to the lighting difficulties where they had light fixtures that did seem to
    alternate accross the ceiling from redish to bluish and white, and spots on the
    ice that seemed bright, dark red and blue, that they had netting along the
    glass between the stands and the playing surface. The AF of my camera seemed
    to frequently focus on the netting and not on the ice yielding me many out of
    focus shots. Fortunately I shot so many photos that there are enough shots for
    my needs that are well enough lit, well composed, close enough in color to
    correct and where the action is in focus and not the netting. The number of
    wasted shots though is a bit discouraging. Like my experience with shooting
    video of hockey, over the years, these experiences do register positively with
    me in one respect. It gives me the experience to know which rinks to make the
    effort in and which ones are a waste of time. At amature level, High School,
    College, Park District, etc. some facilities can be very good while others just
    aren't worth it.

    >I don't have personal experience with the dRebel or the 28-135 IS lens
    >(have considered purchasing the lens), but keep in mind that the f stop
    >is 3.5 at the wide (28mm) end of the zoom and 5.6 at the narrow (135mm)
    >end of the zoom. I'm going to assume you're mostly shooting at 135 or
    >close to it, and there is considerable difference between 5.6 and 2.8.
    >
    >Before purchasing new equipment, try the following:
    >
    >1) set your ISO to 800
    >
    >2) put your camera in Aperture Priority (AV) mode.
    >
    >3) set the aperature to as wide as possible (3.5 at 28mm, 5.6 at 135mm).
    >Refer to your manual for instructions on how to do this.
    >
    >4) you mention your pictures are dark, so try setting your exposure
    >compensation to +.5 or +1 (experiement). Refer to your manual for
    >instructions on how to do this.
    >
    >Shoot a game with the above settings. While shooting (or when you get
    >home), review your camera settings. Your ISO should be 800 in all shots
    >and your aperture should be 5.6 if at 135mm, or close to 5.6 if not
    >quite at 135mm (or 3.5 if at 28mm). What was your shutter speed? You
    >probably don't want anything less than 1/125; ideally you don't really
    >want slower than 1/200.
    >
    >If you're still getting unacceptable shots, try setting your ISO to
    >1600. Keep in mind that you will get grainier shots at 1600. If you're
    >still not happy, it's time to consider a new (to you) lens. ......
     
    WMAS 1960, Dec 31, 2003
    #8
  9. Steve Edwards

    Viper Guest

    Thanks, I will give this a try. I found the Sigma lens you mention below for
    $599 - I'll probably pick it up.

    Can I ask what software you used to create the photo gallery? Is it a
    Dreamweaver wizard? I manage a small site for my son's basketball team,
    www.jammersbball.com, and would love to have a nice gallery like that
    *should I ever be able to shoot shots like you!*

    thanks,
    Doug

    "Johnny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the compliements. I haven't shot basketball, I dedicate *a
    > lot* of time to hockey (photo & web site) from September - May.
    >
    > I don't have personal experience with the dRebel or the 28-135 IS lens
    > (have considered purchasing the lens), but keep in mind that the f stop
    > is 3.5 at the wide (28mm) end of the zoom and 5.6 at the narrow (135mm)
    > end of the zoom. I'm going to assume you're mostly shooting at 135 or
    > close to it, and there is considerable difference between 5.6 and 2.8.
    >
    > Before purchasing new equipment, try the following:
    >
    > 1) set your ISO to 800
    >
    > 2) put your camera in Aperture Priority (AV) mode.
    >
    > 3) set the aperature to as wide as possible (3.5 at 28mm, 5.6 at 135mm).
    > Refer to your manual for instructions on how to do this.
    >
    > 4) you mention your pictures are dark, so try setting your exposure
    > compensation to +.5 or +1 (experiement). Refer to your manual for
    > instructions on how to do this.
    >
    > Shoot a game with the above settings. While shooting (or when you get
    > home), review your camera settings. Your ISO should be 800 in all shots
    > and your aperture should be 5.6 if at 135mm, or close to 5.6 if not
    > quite at 135mm (or 3.5 if at 28mm). What was your shutter speed? You
    > probably don't want anything less than 1/125; ideally you don't really
    > want slower than 1/200.
    >
    > If you're still getting unacceptable shots, try setting your ISO to
    > 1600. Keep in mind that you will get grainier shots at 1600. If you're


    > still not happy, it's time to consider a new (to you) lens. There's
    > nothing wrong with used equipment, and bargains can be found. I've
    > never bought anything on E-Bay, but there are probably some there. B&H
    > Photo (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/) is highly regarded by many
    > photographers and has a good used section; all items are fairly rated on
    > a 10-point scale. I've purchased quite a bit of equipment from B&H, and
    > have made a couple of returns without any problems (used & new
    > equipment). Back to the lens. If you're still getting unacceptable
    > shots with the 28-135 and want good quality but don't need professional
    > quality images, consider Sigma's 70-200 2.8. It's 2.8 throughout the
    > zoom range, and is what I used in almost all of the hockey shots that
    > you saw. At $740 (at B&H) it's not cheap, but is considerably cheaper
    > than Canon's alternative which runs $1,090 (but it is an "L" lens).
    >
    > If you're getting close enough at the 135mm end of your zoom and are
    > zooming to 135 in most of your shots, you may want to consider a prime
    > lens which can be cheaper than the zoom and will frequently give better
    > quality pictures. If you can make do with a 100mm lens, Canon offers a
    > 100mm 2.0 for about $380 (B&H); or a 200mm 2.8 L for $630.
    >
    > Hope this helps...
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    > > Johnny - the site and your photos are awesome. I just got a Digital

    Rebel
    > > and a 28-135 IS USM 3.5-5.6 Canon lens. I would love to take shots of my
    > > son's basketball team anywhere close to what you did here.
    > >
    > > When I put the dReb on 800 ISO I get very dark photos, even in a nicely

    lit
    > > gym. I'll try the exp comp of +1 and Custom WB. Is this lens good enough

    to
    > > shoot these shots? Would a 2.8 70-300 lens be better? Is there that

    much
    > > difference between a 3.5 and 2.8 appature setting?
    > >
    > > Would appreciate any advice...
    > >
    > > Doug
     
    Viper, Dec 31, 2003
    #9
  10. Steve Edwards

    Johnny Guest

    I use "arles image web page creator" which can be found at

    http://www.digitaldutch.com/

    It is very flexible and has a lot of options for customizing. And if
    you have some HTML knowledge, you can create custom templates as I did
    with my gallery --

    http://www.ushl.com/gallery/




    > Can I ask what software you used to create the photo gallery? Is it a
    > Dreamweaver wizard? I manage a small site for my son's basketball team,
    > www.jammersbball.com, and would love to have a nice gallery like that
    > *should I ever be able to shoot shots like you!*
     
    Johnny, Dec 31, 2003
    #10
  11. Steve Edwards

    Johnny Guest

    > First, personally, I would use Shutter Priority rather than Aperature Priority
    > because I think your shutter speed is a little more crucial than your
    > aperature.


    I don't disagree, but the original poster indicated dark shots. Forcing
    a relatively fast shutter speed can still result in dark shots. Using
    Aperture Priority and letting the camera select the shutter speed should
    guarantee a properly exposed picture. Of course, it may be blurry --
    maybe too blurry -- but it shouldn't exhibit the darkness indicated in
    the original message.

    After experimenting with Aperture Priority (AV), some experimenting can
    be done with Shutter Priority (TV), which may result in dark shots. If
    the AV pictures have too much motion blur and the TV shots are too dark,
    the photographer can then switch to Manual mode and try to compromise
    some settings, using a wide open aperture (probably wide open) and a
    "not quite as fast" shutter speed. The shots will still be dark, but
    can then probably be corrected with software.

    > I am reading this thread with great interest myself because I have a D100 also
    > and have been using it for a lot of hockey lately. I have had mixed results
    > myself since one rink I shot at was relatively well lit and the one that I shot
    > at a few weeks ago was horrible.


    Yes, lighting varies *greatly* from rink to rink, as well as within the
    same rink as you have noticed. You should definitely set your custom
    white balance at each rink, but there's not much that can be done for
    the variances at the same rink except making corrections using imaging
    software (ie. Photoshop, Paint Shop Pro, Photo Impact, etc.). Also, be
    sure to set your custom white balance when you change lenses, as there
    may be differences.

    While I have the luxury of not having to worry about anything
    obstructing my view of the players except the linesman's rear end, I do
    have the problem of my camera wanting to autofocus on the boards on the
    opposite side of the rink rather than the player. I have experimented
    during a couple of games with manual focus. I took home fewer shots,
    but I took home more good shots. If your autofocus is consistently
    focusing on the nets, you may want to consider giving manual focus a
    try. Yes, it will take some time to get used to, but you may see more
    good shots.

    John
     
    Johnny, Jan 1, 2004
    #11
  12. Hi Johnny

    I've been following your advice below. I'm mostly shooting pictures of
    minor hockey, bantams and peewees at local rinks. The lens I have today is
    a Nikor AF zoom 35-135mm.

    Looking at your gallery shots, the thing that immediately jumps at me is the
    razor sharp focus and good color of your shots. I saw in a follow up post
    that you recommended a f2.8 zoom. I could swing that lens, but honestly, is
    it going to make a significant difference for me, or are you shooting in
    rinks with superior lighting and much better camera control than I'm likely
    to achieve?

    thanks in advance

    Steve

    "Johnny" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not specific to the D100, but try the following (refer to your manual
    > for specific instructions on how to make the changes):
    >
    > 1) Use custom white balance. If all else fails, use the ice or boards
    > as your reference. This will fix (or reduce) the yellow color cast.
    >
    > 2) Use 800 ISO (experiment with 400 and 1600). You don't mention if
    > you're in an amateur, "junior pro"/major college (AHL, CHL), or NHL
    > rink, so your lighting could be anywhere form bad to good.
    >
    > 3) Either get as close to the glass as possible, or get up high enough
    > to shoot over the glass. Either way, don't use a flash.
    >
    > 4) Set your exposure compensation to +1. You might need to go higher,
    > you might need to go less. (this will reduce/eliminate the dark
    > pictures)
    >
    > 5) Shoot from the corner of the rink to get the best shots. Get in the
    > Zamboni pit if possible. Get on the good side of the team or league
    > personnel and shoot from the penalty box (if it doesn't have glass --
    > don't forget to duck)
    >
    > 6) Shoot *A LOT* of pictures. You'll get some great ones, some good
    > ones, and a lot of bad ones.
    >
    > 7) Generally speaking, fights aren't interesting pictures (unless you
    > get a fist connecting), just a bunch of guys standing around.
    >
    > 8) Don't forget to shoot behind the play. A lot of good checks happen
    > behind the play.
    >
    > Samples using the above tips can be seen at:
    > http://www.ushl.com/gallery/
    >
    > John Elftmann
    >
    >
    >
    > > We have a new Nikon D100. Looking for suggested settings for best
    > > performance in a hockey rink.
    > >
    > > Our first pictures are very dark and have a yellow cast.
     
    Steve Edwards, Jan 15, 2004
    #12
  13. Steve Edwards

    Johnny Guest

    > I've been following your advice below. I'm mostly shooting pictures of
    > minor hockey, bantams and peewees at local rinks. The lens I have today is
    > a Nikor AF zoom 35-135mm.
    >
    > Looking at your gallery shots, the thing that immediately jumps at me is the
    > razor sharp focus and good color of your shots. I saw in a follow up post
    > that you recommended a f2.8 zoom. I could swing that lens, but honestly, is
    > it going to make a significant difference for me, or are you shooting in
    > rinks with superior lighting and much better camera control than I'm likely
    > to achieve?
    >


    There is no doubt that the rink where I do most of my shooting (and
    where all of those gallery shots came from) has relatively good lighting
    (when compared to peewee rinks). The two links below are from a rink
    with relatively poor lighting compared to my usual haunt.

    This first link was about the third time I had used my 10D and I was
    experimenting with a wide variety of exposure settings (ISO, shutter
    speed, aperture, etc.). (original format: large, fine JPG)

    http://www.elftmann.com/ushlgallery/20031010slln/


    The second link, below, is from just this past weekend. These turned
    out a little better (though the highlights are blown in some, I'm
    learning some new software and monitor calibration). These were shot at
    f2.8 and altering between ISO 800 & 1600. It's just a random subset of
    images from that game thought. (original format: RAW, some large, fine
    JPGs)

    http://65.110.64.217/20040110wlln/

    (this is a quick & dirty gallery from an existing template, please
    excuse the copyright banner).

    Perhaps you have a local camera store that would rent you a 2.8 so you
    could try it out? Or exercise your return option if it doesn't work to
    your satisfaction.

    One final note -- I've been shooting 250 frames/game in the "good light
    rink" and keeping a little over half. Lately I've been experimenting
    with manual focus. I'm shooting fewer frames but keeping a higher
    percentage.

    John
     
    Johnny, Jan 16, 2004
    #13
    1. Advertising

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