Hmmmm...

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 8, 2006.

  1. Just cleaned the air filters for my server cabinet.

    Within five minutes the temperature inside the cabinet dropped 1.3 degrees
    and all I did was clean the air filters. :eek:)

    I cleaned out the CPU heatsink and the air filter into the case of my
    desktop box earlier today as well. And under the same load (100% cpu with
    one process set nice 10) its running much quieter and cooler than it was.

    My conclusion: definitely worth doing that sort of things from time to
    time. :eek:)


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    One Unix to rule them all,
    One Resolver to find them,
    One IP to bring them all
    And in the Zone to Bind them.
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 22:12:14 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    exclaimed:

    >Just cleaned the air filters for my server cabinet.
    >
    >Within five minutes the temperature inside the cabinet dropped 1.3 degrees
    >and all I did was clean the air filters. :eek:)
    >
    >I cleaned out the CPU heatsink and the air filter into the case of my
    >desktop box earlier today as well. And under the same load (100% cpu with
    >one process set nice 10) its running much quieter and cooler than it was.
    >
    >My conclusion: definitely worth doing that sort of things from time to
    >time. :eek:)


    Sounds like you're having a fascinating Saturday night... ;-)
    Fred Dagg, Apr 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    krazy Bob Guest

    "Fred Dagg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 22:12:14 +1200, Have A Nice Cup of Tea <>
    > exclaimed:
    >
    >>Just cleaned the air filters for my server cabinet.
    >>
    >>Within five minutes the temperature inside the cabinet dropped 1.3 degrees
    >>and all I did was clean the air filters. :eek:)
    >>
    >>I cleaned out the CPU heatsink and the air filter into the case of my
    >>desktop box earlier today as well. And under the same load (100% cpu with
    >>one process set nice 10) its running much quieter and cooler than it was.
    >>
    >>My conclusion: definitely worth doing that sort of things from time to
    >>time. :eek:)

    >
    > Sounds like you're having a fascinating Saturday night... ;-)


    Thats what id like to do on my saturday night ...LOL that and ohh play world
    of war craft lol hehehe ;-)

    KB
    krazy Bob, Apr 8, 2006
    #3
  4. "Have A Nice Cup of Tea" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Just cleaned the air filters for my server cabinet.
    >
    > Within five minutes the temperature inside the cabinet dropped 1.3 degrees
    > and all I did was clean the air filters. :eek:)
    >
    > I cleaned out the CPU heatsink and the air filter into the case of my
    > desktop box earlier today as well. And under the same load (100% cpu with
    > one process set nice 10) its running much quieter and cooler than it was.
    >
    > My conclusion: definitely worth doing that sort of things from time to
    > time. :eek:)
    >
    >


    Sounds good...

    If that's what you do on Saturday nights, as other poster suggested, don't
    worry - just finished copying data over my home LAN from a 250GB external
    HDD to a new 1TB Maxtor external HDD, plus imaged two machines - a Windows
    XP Pro and Windows Server.

    No, not what I usually do on a Saturday evening, but baby is coming next
    week, so better do lots this week, since time will be at a premium for the
    next few days.


    --

    Mauricio Freitas
    www.geekzone.co.nz, www.geekzone.co.nz/freitasm,
    www.geekzone.co.nz/geekzoneblog.asp
    Software for Pocket PC: www.geekzone.co.nz/store
    Microsoft MVP Mobile Devices
    Mauricio Freitas [MVP], Apr 8, 2006
    #4
  5. On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 23:55:42 +1200, Mauricio Freitas [MVP] wrote:

    > If that's what you do on Saturday nights, as other poster suggested, don't
    > worry - just finished copying data over my home LAN from a 250GB external
    > HDD to a new 1TB Maxtor external HDD, plus imaged two machines - a Windows
    > XP Pro and Windows Server.
    >
    > No, not what I usually do on a Saturday evening, but baby is coming next
    > week, so better do lots this week, since time will be at a premium for the
    > next few days.


    No probs.

    I've just thrown on some bona threads and am about to troll down to the
    benar omee-palones bar to have a bevvy or tray, to palare with some feely
    omees and to vada duay fungus drag queens climb the slanging tree. The
    show doesn't start until 1am so I've got plenty of time.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    Martin Taylor, GM of platform strategy at Microsoft: "We found
    that the Linux environment provided about 15 percent more end
    user loss of productivity." - *provided MORE loss of productivity*
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 8, 2006
    #5
  6. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Have A Nice Cup of Tea,

    do you use a vacume ?

    seriously, every time i have needed to clean out my boxen i have had to use
    a vacume cleaner and a toothbrush - it always makes my heart skip a few beats
    when i switch the power back on.

    ----------------
    Steven H

    the madGeek

    > Just cleaned the air filters for my server cabinet.
    >
    > Within five minutes the temperature inside the cabinet dropped 1.3
    > degrees and all I did was clean the air filters. :eek:)
    >
    > I cleaned out the CPU heatsink and the air filter into the case of my
    > desktop box earlier today as well. And under the same load (100% cpu
    > with one process set nice 10) its running much quieter and cooler than
    > it was.
    >
    > My conclusion: definitely worth doing that sort of things from time to
    > time. :eek:)
    >
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >
    Steven H, Apr 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Shane Guest

    Steven H wrote:

    > Hello Have A Nice Cup of Tea,
    >
    > do you use a vacume ?
    >
    > seriously, every time i have needed to clean out my boxen i have had to
    > use a vacume cleaner and a toothbrush - it always makes my heart skip a
    > few beats when i switch the power back on.
    >
    > ----------------
    > Steven H


    arrrrrggggghhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    scares me from using the vacuum


    --
    Rule 6: There is no Rule 6.
    Shane, Apr 9, 2006
    #7
  8. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jerry Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Steven H wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hello Have A Nice Cup of Tea,
    >>
    >>do you use a vacume ?
    >>
    >>seriously, every time i have needed to clean out my boxen i have had to
    >>use a vacume cleaner and a toothbrush - it always makes my heart skip a
    >>few beats when i switch the power back on.
    >>
    >>----------------
    >>Steven H

    >
    >
    > arrrrrggggghhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    > WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    > Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    > scares me from using the vacuum


    I'd be more afraid of static from the toothbrush. Use the vacuum, but
    hold the rubber or plastic nozzle a couple of centimetres from any
    components. Use a brush on fans or heat sinks, but don't touch the
    electronics with them. If it is bad enough, take the fan off the heat
    sink and clean the built-up mung using the vacuum and a paintbrush.
    Avoid "canned air" which just blows your dirt around, including into
    places you don't want it.

    Personally I believe the people that sell canned air at about $20 spread
    the story that use of a vacuum causes static damage.

    I wouldn't use contact cleaner either, it can mix with whatever your
    dirt contains, and form some sort of tar that gets all over everything.
    If you have a contact problem with ram or cards, re-plugging them will
    wipe the gold on gold, and clean the contacts well enough to last
    another 5 years.
    Jerry, Apr 9, 2006
    #8
  9. On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 01:34:40 +0000, Steven H wrote:

    > Hello Have A Nice Cup of Tea,


    Hi!


    > do you use a vacume ?


    I did use the vaccuum cleaner.

    Didn't need to brush anything - the dust easily came out. It's not been
    all that long since I did it last and I didn't expect to see as much dust
    in the CPU heatsink. It's just that the two construction sites nearby
    really are throwing up a huge amount of fine dust.

    Last time I de-dusted the inside of the computer there was more stuff on
    the bottom of the case than anywhere else.


    > seriously, every time i have needed to clean out my boxen i have had to use
    > a vacume cleaner and a toothbrush - it always makes my heart skip a few beats
    > when i switch the power back on.


    Yeah - that's always the way.


    I've been thinking...

    I'll replace all three of the case fans on my desktop box with "Stealth"
    brand fans. I've got two of those on my server cabinet and they really are
    <shh!> nice and quiet. :eek:)



    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    Martin Taylor, GM of platform strategy at Microsoft: "We found
    that the Linux environment provided about 15 percent more end
    user loss of productivity." - *provided MORE loss of productivity*
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 9, 2006
    #9
  10. On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 13:39:42 +1200, Shane wrote:

    > WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    > Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    > scares me from using the vacuum


    If you take proper antistatic precautions, and the vaccuum is what you
    have available, then I don't see what the problem is.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    Martin Taylor, GM of platform strategy at Microsoft: "We found
    that the Linux environment provided about 15 percent more end
    user loss of productivity." - *provided MORE loss of productivity*
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 9, 2006
    #10
  11. On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 14:41:16 +1200, Jerry wrote:

    > I'd be more afraid of static from the toothbrush. Use the vacuum, but
    > hold the rubber or plastic nozzle a couple of centimetres from any
    > components.


    I've always used the Vaccuum cleaner to clean out the insides of cases and
    around heatsinks.

    It's like sex - always play safe and you won't have any problems.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "When a company starts fighting over IP, it's a
    sign they've lost the real battle, for users."
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 9, 2006
    #11
  12. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Shane Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 13:39:42 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >
    >> WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    >> Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    >> scares me from using the vacuum

    >
    > If you take proper antistatic precautions, and the vaccuum is what you
    > have available, then I don't see what the problem is.
    >
    >
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >



    ok idiot
    considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?

    --
    Rule 6: There is no Rule 6.
    Shane, Apr 9, 2006
    #12
  13. On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 17:34:49 +1200, someone purporting to be Shane didst
    scrawl:

    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >

    *SNIP*
    > ok idiot
    > considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    > static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?


    Leave the box plugged in! That's the most fundamental anti-static
    precaution in existence.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
    Matthew Poole, Apr 9, 2006
    #13
  14. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Shane Guest

    Matthew Poole wrote:

    > On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 17:34:49 +1200, someone purporting to be Shane didst
    > scrawl:
    >
    >> Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >>

    > *SNIP*
    >> ok idiot
    >> considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    >> static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?

    >
    > Leave the box plugged in! That's the most fundamental anti-static
    > precaution in existence.
    >


    ick..
    and that would only give the path of least resistance and, to get to that
    path it *may* still have to travel across cpu's, buses, ram, just about all
    the sensitive parts
    considering its supposed to be built up by the electrons bouncing about,
    unlike an outside static source (eg the tech) who should ground himself out
    before touching the boards
    (ie, the spark is the equalisation between the tech and the boards.. with
    vacuums the charge is building on the board.. now with a path out via the
    power cord)
    or so the theory goes

    --
    Rule 6: There is no Rule 6.
    Shane, Apr 9, 2006
    #14
  15. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jerry Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 13:39:42 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    >>>Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    >>>scares me from using the vacuum

    >>
    >>If you take proper antistatic precautions, and the vaccuum is what you
    >>have available, then I don't see what the problem is.
    >>
    >>
    >>Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > ok idiot
    > considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    > static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?
    >


    Where do you get that idea? Have a look at a computer, there are fans
    in it to move the warm air out of the case. With the computer shut off,
    the vacuum is moving cool air over the components compared to the cpu fans.
    Jerry, Apr 9, 2006
    #15
  16. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Shane Guest

    Jerry wrote:

    > Shane wrote:
    >> Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 13:39:42 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    >>>>Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    >>>>scares me from using the vacuum
    >>>
    >>>If you take proper antistatic precautions, and the vaccuum is what you
    >>>have available, then I don't see what the problem is.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> ok idiot
    >> considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    >> static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?
    >>

    >
    > Where do you get that idea? Have a look at a computer, there are fans
    > in it to move the warm air out of the case. With the computer shut off,
    > the vacuum is moving cool air over the components compared to the cpu
    > fans.


    yeah.. at lower speeds than a vacuum produces
    although with Matthews idea I have to admit you would expect the charge to
    dissipate before it reached levels where it will do damage
    And as Ive said several times.. thats the theory.. Stevens experience shows
    it to be different
    I still doubt (very much) that Lennier had a clue



    --
    Rule 6: There is no Rule 6.
    Shane, Apr 9, 2006
    #16
  17. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jerry Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Jerry wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Shane wrote:
    >>
    >>>Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 13:39:42 +1200, Shane wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>WOuldnt that cause a shitload of static to be thrown about?
    >>>>>Presumably you have succeedded several times so no.. but static is what
    >>>>>scares me from using the vacuum
    >>>>
    >>>>If you take proper antistatic precautions, and the vaccuum is what you
    >>>>have available, then I don't see what the problem is.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Have A Nice Cup of Tea
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>ok idiot
    >>>considering its supposed to be the warm moving air causing the buildup of
    >>>static... what anti static procedures would you recommend?
    >>>

    >>
    >>Where do you get that idea? Have a look at a computer, there are fans
    >>in it to move the warm air out of the case. With the computer shut off,
    >>the vacuum is moving cool air over the components compared to the cpu
    >>fans.

    >
    >
    > yeah.. at lower speeds than a vacuum produces
    > although with Matthews idea I have to admit you would expect the charge to
    > dissipate before it reached levels where it will do damage
    > And as Ive said several times.. thats the theory.. Stevens experience shows
    > it to be different
    > I still doubt (very much) that Lennier had a clue


    I hold the vacuum some distance from the components, certainly not going
    to suck the jumpers off the board :). I don't worry about getting every
    speck of dust off the components, a little isn't going to hurt anything,
    after all, more will soon be on everything. Just suck the big chunks
    off everything, and get the loose stuff out of the box. You can suck
    everything out of the fans and heatsinks, using a brush to help. Seeing
    how fast you can make the fans spin with the vacuum might be fun, but
    not if you value your fan bearings.

    Everything has to be at the same potential, not necessarily earth
    potential. If you plug in the computer to earth it, then dance on a
    nylon carpet whilst wearing rubber soled shoes and drinking from a
    polystyrene cup you are going to zap something as soon as you touch it.
    If you have a wrist strap that you know hasn't failed since the last
    time you tested it, fine, otherwise keep touching the frame with some
    part of your body.

    I've been to a number of anti-static classes, going back to the 60s (we
    had some wonderful new devices, a 256 bit shift register on a chip) and
    have never heard that you need to avoid moving warm air.
    Jerry, Apr 9, 2006
    #17
  18. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Shane Guest

    Jerry wrote:


    > Everything has to be at the same potential, not necessarily earth
    > potential. If you plug in the computer to earth it, then dance on a
    > nylon carpet whilst wearing rubber soled shoes and drinking from a
    > polystyrene cup you are going to zap something as soon as you touch it.
    > If you have a wrist strap that you know hasn't failed since the last
    > time you tested it, fine, otherwise keep touching the frame with some
    > part of your body.
    >


    This was my point about having earthed the board
    You now have the vacuum (supposedly) creating potential, and its got a path
    to travel.. to earth
    Without that path.. its just sitting there

    > I've been to a number of anti-static classes, going back to the 60s (we
    > had some wonderful new devices, a 256 bit shift register on a chip) and
    > have never heard that you need to avoid moving warm air.



    Try putting on a jumper after its been in the dryer :)
    (presumably thats why this theory was given so much weight)

    --
    Rule 6: There is no Rule 6.
    Shane, Apr 9, 2006
    #18
  19. On Sun, 09 Apr 2006 17:43:23 +1200, Shane wrote:

    > and that would only give the path of least resistance and, to get to that
    > path it *may* still have to travel across cpu's, buses, ram, just about all
    > the sensitive parts
    > considering its supposed to be built up by the electrons bouncing about,
    > unlike an outside static source (eg the tech) who should ground himself out
    > before touching the boards
    > (ie, the spark is the equalisation between the tech and the boards.. with
    > vacuums the charge is building on the board.. now with a path out via the
    > power cord)
    > or so the theory goes


    Well I suppose if that's how your computers are - that your computers are
    not throughly earthed, and if your computers are designed in such a way
    that static electricity has to move (contradiction in terms really, moving
    static electricity) across all components before finding an earth rail,
    then your computers must be really poorly designed.

    My case was earthed.

    I was touching the case.

    I was also touching the heatsink before, during, and after I used the
    vaccuum to remove the dust.

    The path of least resistance would have been through me to the case and to
    ground.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    Martin Taylor, GM of platform strategy at Microsoft: "We found
    that the Linux environment provided about 15 percent more end
    user loss of productivity." - *provided MORE loss of productivity*
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 9, 2006
    #19
  20. Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    Jerry Guest

    Shane wrote:
    > Jerry wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>Everything has to be at the same potential, not necessarily earth
    >>potential. If you plug in the computer to earth it, then dance on a
    >>nylon carpet whilst wearing rubber soled shoes and drinking from a
    >>polystyrene cup you are going to zap something as soon as you touch it.
    >> If you have a wrist strap that you know hasn't failed since the last
    >>time you tested it, fine, otherwise keep touching the frame with some
    >>part of your body.
    >>

    >
    >
    > This was my point about having earthed the board
    > You now have the vacuum (supposedly) creating potential, and its got a path
    > to travel.. to earth
    > Without that path.. its just sitting there
    >
    >
    >>I've been to a number of anti-static classes, going back to the 60s (we
    >>had some wonderful new devices, a 256 bit shift register on a chip) and
    >>have never heard that you need to avoid moving warm air.

    >
    >
    >
    > Try putting on a jumper after its been in the dryer :)
    > (presumably thats why this theory was given so much weight)
    >


    You don't need a path to earth to get static discharge. Have you ever
    seen lightning jump from cloud to cloud? Your vacuum isn't going to
    create any more potential than your case fan, and since it is sucking
    rather than blowing, the moving air is at ambient, rather than warmer
    temperature.

    I have yet to try putting a computer in the drier, sounds noisy :p
    Jerry, Apr 9, 2006
    #20
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