Hitchcock and other newly digitally remastered old movies - wait for high-def?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by karlpov, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. karlpov

    karlpov Guest

    I notice that the Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection's major
    selling points for those with the old DVDs is 1) another DVD with
    bonus-type material and 2) new digital remasterings.

    The remasterings are, of course, not high-def. Is it likely that we
    will see triple-dipping in the future with high-def editions, or would
    high-def be likely to enhance movies this old?
     
    karlpov, Oct 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. karlpov <> wrote:

    >The remasterings are, of course, not high-def. Is it likely that we
    >will see triple-dipping in the future with high-def editions, or would
    >high-def be likely to enhance movies this old?


    Triple-dipping is the point of the push for a new format. The DVD market is
    no longer expanding at 100% per year, and the companies think they can
    re-create that.

    Any movie, no matter how old, can benefit from a proper transfer to a
    higher-resolution format, but the main questions are, how much of a
    difference will it make on a standard home screen, and how many people will
    actually notice the difference? I'm not talking about DVD geeks who already
    know what the formats are, I'm talking the average person who still has an
    SD TV, thinks VHS looked pretty good at the SLP speed, and wishes that DVD
    movies didn't have those black bars on the top and bottom of the picture.
    This is the market where the majority of sales are made. Re-buying stuff
    that's been out on DVD ain't gonna have much appeal to them. Whatver hi-def
    format survives the format war is probably going to be merely a niche
    format, like LD was during the heyday of VHS, so expect sustained high
    prices and limited releases.
     
    Kimba W. Lion, Oct 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. karlpov <> wrote:

    >The remasterings are, of course, not high-def. Is it likely that we
    >will see triple-dipping in the future with high-def editions, or would
    >high-def be likely to enhance movies this old?


    <<Triple-dipping is the point of the push for a new format. The DVD market
    is no longer expanding at 100% per year, and the companies think they can
    re-create that.>>

    <<Any movie, no matter how old, can benefit from a proper transfer to a
    higher-resolution format, but the main questions are, how much of a
    difference will it make on a standard home screen, and how many people will
    actually notice the difference? I'm not talking about DVD geeks who already
    know what the formats are, I'm talking the average person who still has an
    SD TV, thinks VHS looked pretty good at the SLP speed, and wishes that DVD
    movies didn't have those black bars on the top and bottom of the picture.
    This is the market where the majority of sales are made. Re-buying stuff
    that's been out on DVD ain't gonna have much appeal to them. Whatver hi-def
    format survives the format war is probably going to be merely a niche
    format, like LD was during the heyday of VHS, so expect sustained high
    prices and limited releases.>>


    I am in total agreement with your premise: After the introduction of DVD, we
    reached the point of diminishing returns. I think that Hi-Definition DVD
    will receive the same piss-warm reception that DVD-A and SACD have gotten.
    The quantum leap between other audio formats (LPs and tapes) and CDs was
    easily discernible to the average consumer. But there is not enough
    discernable difference between audio CDs and the warring DVD-A and SACD
    formats to interest the majority of consumers. Besides, you don't need DVD-A
    and SACD sources to create music files for your iPod.

    With the possible exception of DVD, it seems that home video and audio
    cannot change formats without a format war: Beta vs. VHS, LaserDisc vs.
    SelectaVision and DVD-A vs. SACD. Now, we have to endure the Blu-ray vs.
    HD-DVD bullshit. But, when and if this new format war ever ends, the average
    consumer -- the people who REALLY drive the marketplace -- will not be
    interested in investing in a new video format that only provides what they
    will perceive as marginally-better picture and sound. Nearly all new DVD
    single and double-disk sets sell in the $15 - $20 range. Later, many of
    these same titles will sell for under $10. In addition, good-quality DVD
    players are readily available for under $80. If this DVD price structure had
    not come about, DVD would never have become as popular as it did, in so
    short a time.

    I can only hope that the movie industry will not resort to releasing
    exclusive Hi-Definition DVD titles in an attempt to force consumers into
    changing formats. They will only be cutting their own throats if they try
    this. We can look back at the DIVX fiasco to see how such an arm-twisting
    strategy turned out.
     
    One-Shot Scot, Oct 5, 2005
    #3
  4. karlpov

    AZ Nomad Guest

    On Wed, 5 Oct 2005 07:03:10 -0700, One-Shot Scot <> wrote:

    ><<Any movie, no matter how old, can benefit from a proper transfer to a
    >higher-resolution format, but the main questions are, how much of a


    Higher resolution? Are you still talking about hitchcock films?

    As far as I know, hitchcock never used consumer portable cameras for his work.

    HDTV isn't one tenth as good as the worst hitchcock film.
     
    AZ Nomad, Oct 5, 2005
    #4
  5. karlpov

    Black Locust Guest

    In article <>,
    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:

    > I can only hope that the movie industry will not resort to releasing
    > exclusive Hi-Definition DVD titles in an attempt to force consumers into
    > changing formats. They will only be cutting their own throats if they try
    > this. We can look back at the DIVX fiasco to see how such an arm-twisting
    > strategy turned out.


    This seems unlikely. Look at how they have continued to support the
    archaic 'dead in the water' VHS format all through out the DVD boom. In
    point of fact, Star Wars Episode III is the first MAJOR release from a
    studio to not see a VHS release of any sort, but this is happening in
    late 2005; 8 years after the launch of DVD and after the fact that 9 out
    of every 10 people already own a DVD player(most of them willingly so,
    not because they were forced). Those poor few losers who are STILL(!)
    VHSing it due to sheer ignorance and technophobia have now become
    completely insignificant, so much so that Fox and other Hollywood giants
    can now safely(as if it wasn't safe to do so 3 or even 4 years ago...
    doh!) release even the biggest movies exclusively to DVD.

    Then again, the mindset in Hollywood has now become "Suck the consumer
    of every last penny by repeatedly releasing the same movies over and
    over again." The way they all jumped on the UMD/PSP movie thing as
    quickly as humanly possible when there's hardly even a market for movies
    on the format makes me sick to my stomach. So who knows, maybe they will
    eventually try to force us to upgrade by pulling that sort of stunt... I
    wouldn't put anything past them anymore.
    --
    "Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we.
    They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people,
    and neither do we." - George Dumbya Bush
     
    Black Locust, Oct 6, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <>,
    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:

    > I can only hope that the movie industry will not resort to releasing
    > exclusive Hi-Definition DVD titles in an attempt to force consumers into
    > changing formats. They will only be cutting their own throats if they try
    > this. We can look back at the DIVX fiasco to see how such an arm-twisting
    > strategy turned out.



    <<This seems unlikely. Look at how they have continued to support the
    archaic 'dead in the water' VHS format all through out the DVD boom. In
    point of fact, Star Wars Episode III is the first MAJOR release from a
    studio to not see a VHS release of any sort, but this is happening in late
    2005; 8 years after the launch of DVD and after the fact that 9 out of
    every 10 people already own a DVD player (most of them willingly so, not
    because they were forced). Those poor few losers who are STILL(!) VHSing it
    due to sheer ignorance and technophobia have now become completely
    insignificant, so much so that Fox and other Hollywood giants can now
    safely (as if it wasn't safe to do so 3 or even 4 years ago... doh!)
    release even the biggest movies exclusively to DVD.>>

    <<Then again, the mindset in Hollywood has now become "Suck the consumer of
    every last penny by repeatedly releasing the same movies over and over
    again." The way they all jumped on the UMD/PSP movie thing as quickly as
    humanly possible when there's hardly even a market for movies on the format
    makes me sick to my stomach. So who knows, maybe they will eventually try to
    force us to upgrade by pulling that sort of stunt... I wouldn't put
    anything past them anymore.>>


    Speaking of sucking the consumer dry, I find it interesting that _Star Wars
    Episode III_ is not going to be available on any dead video formats. It is
    unlike George Lucas to do anything so rational, because in April of 2000 he
    released _Star Wars Episode I_ on Japanese LaserDisc -- but the DVD did not
    come out until October 2001. (Of course, this movie was available on VHS.)

    If I recall correctly, the imported Japanese LaserDisc was available in the
    US for around $125, but George Lucas later made it available on his Star
    Wars website for a modest $80.

    And didn't George Lucas also make the undefiled versions of _Star Wars_
    Episodes IV, V, and VI available only on VHS and LaserDisc?

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120915/laserdisc
     
    One-Shot Scot, Oct 6, 2005
    #6
  7. karlpov

    Black Locust Guest

    In article <>,
    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:

    > Speaking of sucking the consumer dry, I find it interesting that _Star Wars
    > Episode III_ is not going to be available on any dead video formats. It is
    > unlike George Lucas to do anything so rational, because in April of 2000 he
    > released _Star Wars Episode I_ on Japanese LaserDisc -- but the DVD did not
    > come out until October 2001. (Of course, this movie was available on VHS.)
    >
    > If I recall correctly, the imported Japanese LaserDisc was available in the
    > US for around $125, but George Lucas later made it available on his Star
    > Wars website for a modest $80.
    >
    > And didn't George Lucas also make the undefiled versions of _Star Wars_
    > Episodes IV, V, and VI available only on VHS and LaserDisc?


    Not only that, but look at how long it took him to get the original
    trilogy on DVD. Still, I applaud Lucas for getting Fox Home Video to
    forgo a VHS release of Revenge of the Sith. This is something the movie
    studios should have started doing years ago.
    --
    "Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we.
    They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people,
    and neither do we." - George Dumbya Bush
     
    Black Locust, Oct 7, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote:

    > And didn't George Lucas also make the undefiled versions of _Star Wars_
    > Episodes IV, V, and VI available only on VHS and LaserDisc?


    <<Not only that, but look at how long it took him to get the original
    trilogy on DVD. Still, I applaud Lucas for getting Fox Home Video to forgo a
    VHS release of Revenge of the Sith. This is something the movie studios
    should have started doing years ago.>>


    Yes, VHS is history, as far as new releases are concerned. The only reason
    that VHS is still alive is because there are lots of movie titles that are
    not available on DVD and they will probably never be available on DVD.
     
    One-Shot Scot, Oct 8, 2005
    #8
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