Higher ISO = increased noise

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Paul, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    the pictures. I did tests and it's true.

    Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?
     
    Paul, Mar 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. Paul

    Lionel Guest

    Kibo informs me that (Paul) stated that:

    >I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    >them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    >the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    >Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    >setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    >ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    When it isn't possible to get a correctly-exposed picture at a lower
    ISO. For example, I often take photos at nightclubs, & usually have to
    shoot at least ISO 800 (if I'm lucky!). If I were to try shooting at ISO
    100, I wouldn't get any pictures at all.

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
     
    Lionel, Mar 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    For example, if it reduces the exposure time and thereby reduces blur due
    to camera shake.....

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Paul

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Have you ever pushed a film speed when shooting with film? Yes, you can
    do it when you absolutely have to. However, it is best not to. You
    should have a tripod handy, and use longer exposures when feasible. If
    your camera has a limit on longest exposure, then is when you may need
    to push. Or, when shooting action, desire to use auto exposure, and
    long exposure will blur.

    You do not get something for nothing, but sometimes motion blur can be
    more objectionable than noise. Or, you HAVE to have good DOF, so must
    select high f/#, but are at stops of shutter speed. Then you must
    accept noise that comes with pushing.

    However, don't push unless you really have to.

    Paul wrote:
    >
    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
     
    Don Stauffer, Mar 1, 2004
    #4
  5. Paul

    Mark Herring Guest

    On 1 Mar 2004 05:40:45 -0800, (Paul) wrote:

    >I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    >them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    >the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    >Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    >setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice?


    No

    > When is a higher
    >ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    With strong light, the signal is high and you can reduce the gain (and
    noise) with a low ISO setting

    **************************
    Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
    Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".
     
    Mark Herring, Mar 1, 2004
    #5
  6. Paul

    Don Guest

    It's nearly impossible to equate the "ISO" of a digital camera to that of
    film. They don't behave very much alike since there is no toe to the
    response curve of digital like the H&D curve of film. In a digital camera,
    the "ISO" is increased by increasing the gain in the electronics, either
    before or during digitization of the signal from the CCD. It is more or
    less equivalent to lopping off the one or two most-significant bits of the
    digital output and adding the corresponding least-significant bits. You can
    do the same thing in post processing, but it can *only* be done
    satisfactorily if you save all of the bits in the data. This usually means
    using the RAW mode in those cameras that have it, or 16-bit TIFF (I don't
    know if any cameras do that).

    Don


    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?
     
    Don, Mar 1, 2004
    #6
  7. Paul

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Paul wrote:

    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    It is often a question of being able to get a picture, with some noise,
    or no picture. Your choice.
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 1, 2004
    #7
  8. (Paul) writes:

    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?


    When the reduced blurring caused by shooting at a higher shutter speed
    as allowed by the higher ISO is more important than the noise you pick
    up. Or, similarly, when the increased depth of field from the smaller
    aperture etc.

    It's always a tradeoff. One of the big benefits of digital is that
    you don't have to finish the roll of film to change the ISO you're
    using.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Photos: <dd-b.lighthunters.net> Snapshots: <www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 1, 2004
    #8
  9. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Thanks to those who posted serious answers, it is appreciated.

    I will continue making tests to see how ISO works. I will try to take
    pictures in low light at ISO 100 to see what it looks like.


    (Paul) wrote in message news:<>...
    > I am learning (very very slowly) about digital cameras and how to use
    > them. I learned that if I increase the ISO, I will see more noise in
    > the pictures. I did tests and it's true.
    >
    > Now, does that mean that I should ALWAYS set my ISO to the lowest
    > setting (100) for ALL my pictures to reduce noice? When is a higher
    > ISO good despite the increased noise in the pictures?
     
    Paul, Mar 1, 2004
    #9
  10. Paul

    Lucas Tam Guest

    (Paul) wrote in news:2bf2ec40.0403011338.332a51d6
    @posting.google.com:

    > I will continue making tests to see how ISO works. I will try to take
    > pictures in low light at ISO 100 to see what it looks like.


    Here's how it works:

    Proper Exposure
    Dark | Bright
    |-------------------------------------------------|
    Slow Shutter Fast Shutter
    High ISO Low ISO

    So what you're trying to do, is find the proper balance between shutter
    speed and ISO to achieve proper exposure.

    When you take a photo with low ISO in the dark, you'll end up with a
    blurred picture (due to the slow shutter speed), or no picture at all
    (because the shutter may not be slow enough!).


    --
    Lucas Tam ()
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
     
    Lucas Tam, Mar 1, 2004
    #10
  11. Paul

    imbsysop Guest

    On Mon, 01 Mar 2004 21:52:33 GMT, Lucas Tam <>
    wrote:

    > (Paul) wrote in news:2bf2ec40.0403011338.332a51d6
    >@posting.google.com:
    >
    >> I will continue making tests to see how ISO works. I will try to take
    >> pictures in low light at ISO 100 to see what it looks like.

    >
    >Here's how it works:
    >
    > Proper Exposure
    >Dark | Bright
    >|-------------------------------------------------|
    >Slow Shutter Fast Shutter
    >High ISO Low ISO
    >
    >So what you're trying to do, is find the proper balance between shutter
    >speed and ISO to achieve proper exposure.


    but yr schematics is purely theoretical :) I find myself shooting
    almost all the time in manual mode with moderate ISO in bright
    conditions & smallest aperture (high DOF) allowing a shutterspeed
    that is fast enough to compensate/eliminate for accidental "motion
    blur/shake" :) and with the idea that for "night shots" the margin is
    mostly boiling down to high ISO & slow shutter speed depending on the
    specs of the camera for low light shots ...
     
    imbsysop, Mar 2, 2004
    #11
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