high voltage

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by a...., Sep 19, 2003.

  1. a....

    a.... Guest

    can someone help me my voltage on my comp is running at +12v is 16.32 +5v is
    6.854 +3.3v is 4.08 and my vcore is 4.08,

    im running a athlon 2600 tbred
     
    a...., Sep 19, 2003
    #1
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  2. a....

    Stevo Guest

    a.... wrote:
    > can someone help me my voltage on my comp is running at +12v is 16.32
    > +5v is
    > 6.854 +3.3v is 4.08 and my vcore is 4.08,
    >
    > im running a athlon 2600 tbred


    They seem inordinately high... almost in the smoke releasing category (that
    renders electronics unusable until someone invents a means of reloading the
    smoke)...

    My suggestion would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from the power supply and
    then measure the voltages with a multimeter. If they are still high then try
    another power supply..

    --
    Stevo
    (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
     
    Stevo, Sep 19, 2003
    #2
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  3. a....

    mdp Guest

    Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load. Without a load,
    they will typically read high. I would try and check one of them very
    carefully while connected or take the PS to a shop to have it tested.


    "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    news:3f6aaa4b$0$20475$...
    > a.... wrote:
    > > can someone help me my voltage on my comp is running at +12v is 16.32
    > > +5v is
    > > 6.854 +3.3v is 4.08 and my vcore is 4.08,
    > >
    > > im running a athlon 2600 tbred

    >
    > They seem inordinately high... almost in the smoke releasing category

    (that
    > renders electronics unusable until someone invents a means of reloading

    the
    > smoke)...
    >
    > My suggestion would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from the power supply and
    > then measure the voltages with a multimeter. If they are still high then

    try
    > another power supply..
    >
    > --
    > Stevo
    > (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    >
    >
     
    mdp, Sep 19, 2003
    #3
  4. a....

    Stevo Guest

    mdp wrote:
    > Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load. Without
    > a load, they will typically read high. I would try and check one of
    > them very carefully while connected or take the PS to a shop to have
    > it tested.
    >
    >


    In over 20 years in the industry I have yet to see a PC power supply read
    more than a few percent high without a load, unless they were faulty!

    If the voltages are as high as the OP reported, there is a great risk of
    permanent and expensive damage if he leaves it all connected..

    But everyone is entitled to an opinion and the OP can make his choice.. and
    wear the consequences..

    --
    Stevo
    (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
     
    Stevo, Sep 19, 2003
    #4
  5. a....

    h2so4 Guest

    "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    news:3f6ab0a8$0$20475$...
    > mdp wrote:
    > > Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load. Without
    > > a load, they will typically read high. I would try and check one of
    > > them very carefully while connected or take the PS to a shop to have
    > > it tested.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > In over 20 years in the industry I have yet to see a PC power supply read
    > more than a few percent high without a load, unless they were faulty!
    >
    > If the voltages are as high as the OP reported, there is a great risk of
    > permanent and expensive damage if he leaves it all connected..
    >
    > But everyone is entitled to an opinion and the OP can make his choice..

    and
    > wear the consequences..
    >
    > --
    > Stevo
    > (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    >

    It's my hunch that that a... is using inaccurate or incorrectly configured
    monitoring software/hardware. I don't believe his readings.
     
    h2so4, Sep 19, 2003
    #5
  6. a....

    Stevo Guest

    h2so4 wrote:
    > "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    > news:3f6ab0a8$0$20475$...
    >> mdp wrote:
    >>> Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load. Without
    >>> a load, they will typically read high. I would try and check one of
    >>> them very carefully while connected or take the PS to a shop to have
    >>> it tested.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> In over 20 years in the industry I have yet to see a PC power supply
    >> read more than a few percent high without a load, unless they were
    >> faulty!
    >>
    >> If the voltages are as high as the OP reported, there is a great
    >> risk of permanent and expensive damage if he leaves it all
    >> connected..
    >>
    >> But everyone is entitled to an opinion and the OP can make his
    >> choice.. and wear the consequences..
    >>
    >> --
    >> Stevo
    >> (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    >>

    > It's my hunch that that a... is using inaccurate or incorrectly
    > configured monitoring software/hardware. I don't believe his readings.


    I totally agree...

    In my original post, in response to the OP, I recommended that he confirm
    those voltages with a multimeter...

    " They seem inordinately high... almost in the smoke releasing category
    (that
    renders electronics unusable until someone invents a means of reloading the
    smoke)...

    My suggestion would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from the power supply and
    then measure the voltages with a multimeter. If they are still high then try
    another power supply.."

    --
    Stevo
    (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
     
    Stevo, Sep 19, 2003
    #6
  7. a....

    Gordon Guest

    Could it be these voltages are adjustable in the bios?
    Also an icrease of about 30 per cent would ensure that the user would have
    fried component for breakfast, not bacon.
    Gordo
    "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    news:3f6abc48$0$10357$...
    > h2so4 wrote:
    > > "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    > > news:3f6ab0a8$0$20475$...
    > >> mdp wrote:
    > >>> Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load. Without
    > >>> a load, they will typically read high. I would try and check one of
    > >>> them very carefully while connected or take the PS to a shop to have
    > >>> it tested.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >> In over 20 years in the industry I have yet to see a PC power supply
    > >> read more than a few percent high without a load, unless they were
    > >> faulty!
    > >>
    > >> If the voltages are as high as the OP reported, there is a great
    > >> risk of permanent and expensive damage if he leaves it all
    > >> connected..
    > >>
    > >> But everyone is entitled to an opinion and the OP can make his
    > >> choice.. and wear the consequences..
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Stevo
    > >> (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    > >>

    > > It's my hunch that that a... is using inaccurate or incorrectly
    > > configured monitoring software/hardware. I don't believe his readings.

    >
    > I totally agree...
    >
    > In my original post, in response to the OP, I recommended that he confirm
    > those voltages with a multimeter...
    >
    > " They seem inordinately high... almost in the smoke releasing category
    > (that
    > renders electronics unusable until someone invents a means of reloading

    the
    > smoke)...
    >
    > My suggestion would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from the power supply and
    > then measure the voltages with a multimeter. If they are still high then

    try
    > another power supply.."
    >
    > --
    > Stevo
    > (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    >
    >
     
    Gordon, Sep 19, 2003
    #7
  8. a....

    Stevo Guest

    Gordon wrote:
    > Could it be these voltages are adjustable in the bios?
    > Also an icrease of about 30 per cent would ensure that the user
    > would have fried component for breakfast, not bacon.
    > Gordo
    > "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    > news:3f6abc48$0$10357$...
    >> h2so4 wrote:
    >>> "Stevo" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:3f6ab0a8$0$20475$...
    >>>> mdp wrote:
    >>>>> Many power supplies need to be measured while under a load.
    >>>>> Without a load, they will typically read high. I would try and
    >>>>> check one of them very carefully while connected or take the PS
    >>>>> to a shop to have it tested.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> In over 20 years in the industry I have yet to see a PC power
    >>>> supply read more than a few percent high without a load, unless
    >>>> they were faulty!
    >>>>
    >>>> If the voltages are as high as the OP reported, there is a great
    >>>> risk of permanent and expensive damage if he leaves it all
    >>>> connected..
    >>>>
    >>>> But everyone is entitled to an opinion and the OP can make his
    >>>> choice.. and wear the consequences..
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Stevo
    >>>> (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
    >>>>
    >>> It's my hunch that that a... is using inaccurate or incorrectly
    >>> configured monitoring software/hardware. I don't believe his
    >>> readings.

    >>
    >> I totally agree...
    >>
    >> In my original post, in response to the OP, I recommended that he
    >> confirm those voltages with a multimeter...
    >>
    >> " They seem inordinately high... almost in the smoke releasing
    >> category (that
    >> renders electronics unusable until someone invents a means of
    >> reloading the smoke)...
    >>
    >> My suggestion would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from the power
    >> supply and then measure the voltages with a multimeter. If they are
    >> still high then try another power supply.."
    >>
    >> --
    >> Stevo
    >> (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)


    No.. the BIOS can only monitor them... in a PVC anyway..

    The power supply should be regulated within very close tolerances (5%?) of
    the required voltages +5VDC. +12VDC -5VDC and -12VDC - if they aren't then
    the power supply is up for replacement..

    --
    Stevo
    (pull the PIN to reply by e-mail)
     
    Stevo, Sep 19, 2003
    #8
  9. a....

    Boomer Guest

    a.... said:


    Do NOT post a binary to a NON-binary newsgroup.

    Put it on the web or post it to a binaries group.
     
    Boomer, Sep 19, 2003
    #9
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