High Definition

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by dvdguy2@webtv.net, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Guest

    At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.

    So what I need to know now is

    Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?

    and how much do they cost?
    , Mar 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. Neil Wagner Guest

    wrote:
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    > So what I need to know now is
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    > and how much do they cost?


    See http://www.ibiquity.com/hdradio/
    _
    N
    Neil Wagner, Mar 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Biz Guest

    Call letters of the station please?


    <> wrote in message news:d15vkr$2h4$...
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?
    >
    >
    >
    Biz, Mar 16, 2005
    #3
  4. In article <d15vkr$2h4$>, wrote:
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?


    :) They probably cost more, sound worse, consume so much battery power
    that they have to be provided with a separate mains power supply (which
    isn't shown in the brochure of course), and will be enthusiastically
    advertised for at least two years before any of them actually appear in the
    shops, by which time you'll have forgotten why you were interested and
    spent your money on something much more worthwhile It won't be available as
    an option in the new car you're thinking of buying, and half the programmes
    will be transmitted in mono.

    Rod.
    Roderick Stewart, Mar 16, 2005
    #4
  5. In article <d15vkr$2h4$>, <> wrote:
    >At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    >"is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.


    >So what I need to know now is Does anyone know where I can buy a
    >high-definition radio? and how much do they cost?


    Typical radio promotion gimick.

    Here is an excerpt from Chuck Blore's future book showing how
    things were done 'back then'
    -----------------------
    When High Fidelity was a big deal in records,
    Gordon's stations were all Hi-Fi Radio."

    "What made them Hi-Fi. Was that just a name?"

    "Oh no. He always made it seem very special. And very real. When we
    began promoting "Hi-Fi is coming to radio" all the stations were told
    to back off the higher frequencies of the actual signal a little bit
    each day for two weeks.

    Without anyone really noticing, at least that was the theory, the
    actual stations signal gradually became kind of dull, and duller. But
    then, we had the big announcement ... `Ladies and Gentlemen. Welcome a
    new millenia in radio broadcasting. This is K E L P HI-FI RADIO' and
    with that we slapped all those frequency adjustments back to normal
    and, Oh God! What a difference."

    -------------------------

    Don't believe 50% of what you hear on radio promos, the ignore the
    remainder


    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
    Bill Vermillion, Mar 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Ronald Cole Guest

    writes:
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?


    Only car radios are out at the moment. JVC KD-SHX900 and Panasonic
    CQ-CB9900U are just two that I know of off the top of my head. Boston
    Acoustics will release the Receiver Radio HD in May, or so they say.
    I expect that there will be a bunch of HD Radio receivers out by the
    end of the year.

    --
    Forte International, P.O. Box 1412, Ridgecrest, CA 93556-1412
    Ronald Cole <> Phone: (760) 499-9142
    President, CEO Fax: (760) 499-9152
    My GPG fingerprint: C3AF 4BE9 BEA6 F1C2 B084 4A88 8851 E6C8 69E3 B00B
    Ronald Cole, Mar 16, 2005
    #6
  7. On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 06:34:03 +0000, dvdguy2 wrote:

    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?


    Find your local Kenwood Car audio dealer, Kenwood has 9 models that
    support the HD Tuner module.

    or
    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-2VARpjD4zT9/cgi-bin/ProdGroup.asp?g=186750&avf=Y
    Korbin Dallas, Mar 16, 2005
    #7
  8. News Admin Guest

    wrote:
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio
    > station "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio
    > frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?


    Is this the same as "IBOC" digital radio ? AIUI this is the US digital
    radio system, where radio stations broadcast a digital carrier close to
    their analogue one. It is VERY different to the European DAB radio system
    which is usually implemented in a different frequency band. (In the UK the
    DAB system occupies Band III, whereas VHF FM occupies Band II)
    News Admin, Mar 16, 2005
    #8
  9. wrote:
    > At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    > "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >
    > So what I need to know now is
    >
    > Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >
    > and how much do they cost?
    >


    It's only the voices in your head. You've taken your tin foil hat off
    again, haven't you.

    Matthew

    --
    Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
    You can't win
    You can't break even
    You can't get out of the game
    Matthew L. Martin, Mar 16, 2005
    #9
  10. jayembee Guest

    "Biz" <> wrote:

    > <> wrote:
    >>
    >> At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    >> "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >>
    >> So what I need to know now is
    >>
    >> Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >>
    >> and how much do they cost?

    >
    > Call letters of the station please?


    He probably doesn't remember, but dollars to donuts he has a
    recording of it on cassette tape somewhere...

    -- jayembee
    jayembee, Mar 17, 2005
    #10
  11. Richard C. Guest

    --
    X-No-archive: yes

    "jayembee" <> wrote in message
    news:d1b6gf$8p4$...
    > "Biz" <> wrote:
    >
    >> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
    >>> "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
    >>>
    >>> So what I need to know now is
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
    >>>
    >>> and how much do they cost?

    >>
    >> Call letters of the station please?

    >
    > He probably doesn't remember, but dollars to donuts he has a
    > recording of it on cassette tape somewhere...
    >
    > -- jayembee
    >

    ==============================
    The HORRIBLE thing, is that dvdputz is correct for the first time.
    Several Seattle stations are broadcasting in "high definition" also:

    http://www.king.org/hdradio/
    http://www.ibiquity.com/hdradio/
    http://www.simplebits.com/notebook/2005/02/20/hdradio.html
    http://www.wfuv.org/wfuv/digitalradio.html

    I think his being correct, however, is just an accident.
    =============================
    Richard C., Mar 18, 2005
    #11
  12. Jeff Rife Guest

    Richard C. () wrote in alt.video.digital-tv:
    > The HORRIBLE thing, is that dvdputz is correct for the first time.
    > Several Seattle stations are broadcasting in "high definition" also:
    >
    > http://www.king.org/hdradio/


    When the broadcaster doesn't know what is going on with current technology,
    it doesn't bode well for new technology. A snippet from that page:

    =================================================================
    What does it mean that 98.1 KING FM is broadcasting in HD Radio=3F Technology?

    For those with digital receivers, the noise and interference that cause the
    static, hiss, pops, and fades heard on today's analog radios will be
    virtually eliminated.
    =================================================================

    There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
    of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

    --
    Jeff Rife | "The Babylon Project was our last, best hope
    | for peace.... It failed."
    |
    | -- Commander Susan Ivanova, 2260
    Jeff Rife, Apr 1, 2005
    #12
  13. Bill Turner Guest

    On 1 Apr 2005 00:25:22 GMT, Jeff Rife <> wrote:

    >There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
    >of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

    ___________________________________________________________

    That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
    noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
    signal.

    The same is true for a digital signal. If the noise is strong enough and
    persistent enough, the signal will be lost. Digital does have one
    advantage over analog however: Error correction is possible. With
    analog, you either get it the first time or not at all.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 2, 2005
    #13
  14. Jeff Rife Guest

    Bill Turner () wrote in alt.video.digital-tv:
    > On 1 Apr 2005 00:25:22 GMT, Jeff Rife <> wrote:
    >
    > >There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
    > >of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
    > noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
    > signal.


    No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
    at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
    the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

    --
    Jeff Rife | "One minute we were spanking each other with
    | meat, and the next minute it got weird."
    |
    | -- Joe Hackett, "Wings"
    Jeff Rife, Apr 3, 2005
    #14
  15. Bill Turner Guest

    On 2 Apr 2005 23:56:43 GMT, Jeff Rife <> wrote:

    >No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
    >at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
    >the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

    ___________________________________________________________

    Nonsense. You obviously don't listen to weak FM signals which can be
    heard, but with noise. Ham radio operators using FM do it all the time.

    My disagreement here is with your original statement "There is no
    static, hiss, or pops on FM radio." That statement is too broad to be
    correct. There are lots of exceptions.

    --
    BT
    Bill Turner, Apr 4, 2005
    #15
  16. In article <d2nbfr$813$>, Jeff Rife wrote:
    > > >There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
    > > >of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

    > > ___________________________________________________________
    > >
    > > That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
    > > noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
    > > signal.

    >
    > No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
    > at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
    > the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.


    True. If the signal fades, eventually you'll lose reception of *any* type of
    radio transmission. AM, FM and digital simply die different deaths, viz-

    AM - programme volume decreases and gradually disappears into noise.
    FM - noise increases and gradually overwhelms programme.
    Digital - nothing noticeable at all at first, then screetches and yelps and
    suddenly disappears altogether.

    Rod.
    Roderick Stewart, Apr 4, 2005
    #16
  17. Stephen Neal Guest

    "Bill Turner" <> wrote in message
    news:d2qi6o$94l$...
    > On 2 Apr 2005 23:56:43 GMT, Jeff Rife <> wrote:
    >
    >>No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
    >>at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
    >>the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

    > ___________________________________________________________
    >
    > Nonsense. You obviously don't listen to weak FM signals which can be
    > heard, but with noise. Ham radio operators using FM do it all the time.
    >
    > My disagreement here is with your original statement "There is no
    > static, hiss, or pops on FM radio." That statement is too broad to be
    > correct. There are lots of exceptions.
    >


    Yes - especially if by "FM radio" you include the standard broadcast stereo
    imlementation - where the stereo difference signal gets progressively
    noisier, meaning many radios include a force MONO button, as the stereo sum
    (i.e. mono audio) "lasts longer" - and clear mono may be preferable to poor
    stereo?

    I realise this is because the difference signal is carried using additional
    modulation techniques, but when talking about "FM" radio as a consumer
    product, most people mean FM VHF stereo as broadcast, rather than a purely
    FM modulation technique?

    Steve
    Stephen Neal, Apr 8, 2005
    #17
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