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Discussion in 'Cisco' started by g-ca I, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. g-ca I

    g-ca I Guest

    Can somebody PLEASE write the formula for calculating "minimum frame
    size in Ethernrt"??? it's of crucial importance...
     
    g-ca I, Mar 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. g-ca I

    Merv Guest

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  3. g-ca I

    g-ca I Guest

    Thank you so much.
    However, the page discusses about maximum frame size, not minimum one
    :-(
    Can you help me about the minumum????
     
    g-ca I, Apr 3, 2006
    #3
  4. g-ca I

    Merv Guest


    > write the formula for calculating "minimum frame size in Ethernrt"???


    see

    www.erg.abdn.ac.uk/users/gorry/course/lan-pages/enet-calc.html


    Please look at the above article VERY CAREFULLY.

    Notice the column heading thatsays "Minimum Size Frame"

    In memory teh minimum size Ethernet frame will be 64 bytes ( 60 bytes
    without CRC)

    Minimum on the wire is as the article indicates 84 bytes.
     
    Merv, Apr 3, 2006
    #4
  5. g-ca I

    g-ca I Guest

    Yes, but the question I should answer asks for explanation why minumum
    frame size is needed and it also indicates that there was a formula
    from which the standard size of 64 bits was derived. And finaly it asks
    for the formula. With that formula I sholud also prove in a way that it
    is not posssible for smaller size... Somebody told me that he found the
    formula in Internet. So, now Im sure that the question is not tricky
    and that the formula exists. But I must found myself. And I can not :-(
    :-( :-(
     
    g-ca I, Apr 3, 2006
    #5
  6. g-ca I

    Merv Guest

    The reason a minimum frame size was/is to allow enough time for two
    stations at maximum distance from each other on an Ethernet bus-segment
    (read coax cable) so that the trasnmitting station can transmit a
    minimum size frame and the "receiving" station can detect a collision
    and have enough time to send a jam signal that the transmitting
    stations will receive (i.e know that a collision occurred).

    This is known as the Ethernet slot time = 2 x 232 bits + 48 bits = 512
    bits / 8 = 64 bytes
     
    Merv, Apr 3, 2006
    #6
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