Hewlett Packard in disarray

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Henry, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. Henry

    Henry Guest

    Hewlett Packard in disarray

    Got a HP Pavillion Desktop? Do you know some parts are simply not available
    because HP doesn't keep them all in stock.
    Can you wait a month or more to keep your computer working under warranty?
    Do you think "Total Care" means HP cares for
    you? Not so. It means "Total Care" when they feel like helping you. Like
    being treated like dirt once you've bought your
    computer? You might get lied to or told you would be called back by phone.
    Some case.
     
    Henry, Sep 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Henry

    Robert Baer Guest

    Henry wrote:

    > Hewlett Packard in disarray
    >
    > Got a HP Pavillion Desktop? Do you know some parts are simply not available
    > because HP doesn't keep them all in stock.
    > Can you wait a month or more to keep your computer working under warranty?
    > Do you think "Total Care" means HP cares for
    > you? Not so. It means "Total Care" when they feel like helping you. Like
    > being treated like dirt once you've bought your
    > computer? You might get lied to or told you would be called back by phone.
    > Some case.
    >
    >

    Quit your bitching, and take the case to small claims court.
    It is inexpensive, and by law, they cannot be represented by a lawyer.
    Find an appropriate person in the most directly related group inside
    HP to name in the lawsuit - ideally, someone that should have the
    authority to solve the problem, *and* that you have already contacted.
    Have *all* of the facts in hand: *who* you contacted, *where* (what
    group, and relevance), *what* was said and promised, and *when* that
    discussion took place.
    In chronological order, and if at all possible, a letter that says
    "we cannot support you according to our promises stated in <ads
    mentioned>" - even if not all of that is in the letter, the ads, or
    other material that show *public* promises that contradicts the intent
    or phrasing in the letter.
    Also, elucidate your troubles in trying to get them to perform to
    that promise of customer support.
    You *must* have some lost money involved to sue for, and be able to
    prove that loss in a legitimate manner.
    Costs of travel, legal work, investigation cannot be used.
    Did you, on a regular basis, do any kind of business (personal or
    otherwise) with that computer being your main method of doing that business?
    That is a good basis for loss.
    But, what did you do to mitigate that loss?
    Did you buy, rent or borrow another computer while the main one was
    unusable?
    The costs of the replacement could be added to the loss.
    Some courts also allow punitive damages, and have been known to
    automatically add that in nasty cases like this.
    You cannot put a value to punitive damages, even if the court can add
    such - so the *most* you might say in a court that allows punitive
    damages, is (only in *closing*) "perhaps punitive damages might be in
    order" - or something like that, but no stronger, but maybe weaker - if
    you mention it at all.
    Those that come into small claims court are presumed to not know the
    law (unless they pop in and out on a rather regular basis).
     
    Robert Baer, Sep 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Henry

    Kenny Guest

    One thing to watch out for is that if you decide to instigate any sort of
    legal action it will be against the retailer you bought the PC from, not HP
    themselves.
    First PC I bought, a Compaq, had a design flaw in that the onboard sound
    wouldn't play midi files properly.
    The shop fobbed me off onto a premium rate Compaq support number. Took
    advice from CAB who told me they were wrong to do that, my contract was with
    them and not HP.
    Eventually took it to Small Claims, got all the money back plus expenses.

    --

    Kenny Cargill


    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:64N_e.4434$...
    > Henry wrote:
    >
    >> Hewlett Packard in disarray
    >>
    >> Got a HP Pavillion Desktop? Do you know some parts are simply not
    >> available because HP doesn't keep them all in stock.
    >> Can you wait a month or more to keep your computer working under
    >> warranty? Do you think "Total Care" means HP cares for
    >> you? Not so. It means "Total Care" when they feel like helping you. Like
    >> being treated like dirt once you've bought your
    >> computer? You might get lied to or told you would be called back by
    >> phone. Some case.

    > Quit your bitching, and take the case to small claims court.
    > It is inexpensive, and by law, they cannot be represented by a lawyer.
    > Find an appropriate person in the most directly related group inside HP
    > to name in the lawsuit - ideally, someone that should have the authority
    > to solve the problem, *and* that you have already contacted.
    > Have *all* of the facts in hand: *who* you contacted, *where* (what
    > group, and relevance), *what* was said and promised, and *when* that
    > discussion took place.
    > In chronological order, and if at all possible, a letter that says "we
    > cannot support you according to our promises stated in <ads mentioned>" -
    > even if not all of that is in the letter, the ads, or other material that
    > show *public* promises that contradicts the intent or phrasing in the
    > letter.
    > Also, elucidate your troubles in trying to get them to perform to that
    > promise of customer support.
    > You *must* have some lost money involved to sue for, and be able to
    > prove that loss in a legitimate manner.
    > Costs of travel, legal work, investigation cannot be used.
    > Did you, on a regular basis, do any kind of business (personal or
    > otherwise) with that computer being your main method of doing that
    > business?
    > That is a good basis for loss.
    > But, what did you do to mitigate that loss?
    > Did you buy, rent or borrow another computer while the main one was
    > unusable?
    > The costs of the replacement could be added to the loss.
    > Some courts also allow punitive damages, and have been known to
    > automatically add that in nasty cases like this.
    > You cannot put a value to punitive damages, even if the court can add
    > such - so the *most* you might say in a court that allows punitive
    > damages, is (only in *closing*) "perhaps punitive damages might be in
    > order" - or something like that, but no stronger, but maybe weaker - if
    > you mention it at all.
    > Those that come into small claims court are presumed to not know the law
    > (unless they pop in and out on a rather regular basis).
    >
     
    Kenny, Sep 29, 2005
    #3
  4. Henry

    Henry Guest

    Thanks for your sound advice. I am waiting 24hours because after 31 days I
    finally got a phone call from an HP case manager and he asked for 24hrs.

    "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    news:64N_e.4434$...
    > Henry wrote:
    >
    >> Hewlett Packard in disarray
    >>
    >> Got a HP Pavillion Desktop? Do you know some parts are simply not
    >> available because HP doesn't keep them all in stock.
    >> Can you wait a month or more to keep your computer working under
    >> warranty? Do you think "Total Care" means HP cares for
    >> you? Not so. It means "Total Care" when they feel like helping you. Like
    >> being treated like dirt once you've bought your
    >> computer? You might get lied to or told you would be called back by
    >> phone. Some case.

    > Quit your bitching, and take the case to small claims court.
    > It is inexpensive, and by law, they cannot be represented by a lawyer.
    > Find an appropriate person in the most directly related group inside HP
    > to name in the lawsuit - ideally, someone that should have the authority
    > to solve the problem, *and* that you have already contacted.
    > Have *all* of the facts in hand: *who* you contacted, *where* (what
    > group, and relevance), *what* was said and promised, and *when* that
    > discussion took place.
    > In chronological order, and if at all possible, a letter that says "we
    > cannot support you according to our promises stated in <ads mentioned>" -
    > even if not all of that is in the letter, the ads, or other material that
    > show *public* promises that contradicts the intent or phrasing in the
    > letter.
    > Also, elucidate your troubles in trying to get them to perform to that
    > promise of customer support.
    > You *must* have some lost money involved to sue for, and be able to
    > prove that loss in a legitimate manner.
    > Costs of travel, legal work, investigation cannot be used.
    > Did you, on a regular basis, do any kind of business (personal or
    > otherwise) with that computer being your main method of doing that
    > business?
    > That is a good basis for loss.
    > But, what did you do to mitigate that loss?
    > Did you buy, rent or borrow another computer while the main one was
    > unusable?
    > The costs of the replacement could be added to the loss.
    > Some courts also allow punitive damages, and have been known to
    > automatically add that in nasty cases like this.
    > You cannot put a value to punitive damages, even if the court can add
    > such - so the *most* you might say in a court that allows punitive
    > damages, is (only in *closing*) "perhaps punitive damages might be in
    > order" - or something like that, but no stronger, but maybe weaker - if
    > you mention it at all.
    > Those that come into small claims court are presumed to not know the law
    > (unless they pop in and out on a rather regular basis).
    >
     
    Henry, Sep 29, 2005
    #4
  5. Henry

    Henry Guest

    Thanks for your help but I bought the computer directly from HP (big
    mistake).
    "Kenny" <> wrote in message
    news:dhgtms$oaf$...
    > One thing to watch out for is that if you decide to instigate any sort of
    > legal action it will be against the retailer you bought the PC from, not
    > HP themselves.
    > First PC I bought, a Compaq, had a design flaw in that the onboard sound
    > wouldn't play midi files properly.
    > The shop fobbed me off onto a premium rate Compaq support number. Took
    > advice from CAB who told me they were wrong to do that, my contract was
    > with them and not HP.
    > Eventually took it to Small Claims, got all the money back plus expenses.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Kenny Cargill
    >
    >
    > "Robert Baer" <> wrote in message
    > news:64N_e.4434$...
    >> Henry wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hewlett Packard in disarray
    >>>
    >>> Got a HP Pavillion Desktop? Do you know some parts are simply not
    >>> available because HP doesn't keep them all in stock.
    >>> Can you wait a month or more to keep your computer working under
    >>> warranty? Do you think "Total Care" means HP cares for
    >>> you? Not so. It means "Total Care" when they feel like helping you. Like
    >>> being treated like dirt once you've bought your
    >>> computer? You might get lied to or told you would be called back by
    >>> phone. Some case.

    >> Quit your bitching, and take the case to small claims court.
    >> It is inexpensive, and by law, they cannot be represented by a lawyer.
    >> Find an appropriate person in the most directly related group inside HP
    >> to name in the lawsuit - ideally, someone that should have the authority
    >> to solve the problem, *and* that you have already contacted.
    >> Have *all* of the facts in hand: *who* you contacted, *where* (what
    >> group, and relevance), *what* was said and promised, and *when* that
    >> discussion took place.
    >> In chronological order, and if at all possible, a letter that says "we
    >> cannot support you according to our promises stated in <ads mentioned>" -
    >> even if not all of that is in the letter, the ads, or other material that
    >> show *public* promises that contradicts the intent or phrasing in the
    >> letter.
    >> Also, elucidate your troubles in trying to get them to perform to that
    >> promise of customer support.
    >> You *must* have some lost money involved to sue for, and be able to
    >> prove that loss in a legitimate manner.
    >> Costs of travel, legal work, investigation cannot be used.
    >> Did you, on a regular basis, do any kind of business (personal or
    >> otherwise) with that computer being your main method of doing that
    >> business?
    >> That is a good basis for loss.
    >> But, what did you do to mitigate that loss?
    >> Did you buy, rent or borrow another computer while the main one was
    >> unusable?
    >> The costs of the replacement could be added to the loss.
    >> Some courts also allow punitive damages, and have been known to
    >> automatically add that in nasty cases like this.
    >> You cannot put a value to punitive damages, even if the court can add
    >> such - so the *most* you might say in a court that allows punitive
    >> damages, is (only in *closing*) "perhaps punitive damages might be in
    >> order" - or something like that, but no stronger, but maybe weaker - if
    >> you mention it at all.
    >> Those that come into small claims court are presumed to not know the
    >> law (unless they pop in and out on a rather regular basis).
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Henry, Sep 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Henry

    CLV3 Guest

    HP and Compaq are two of the worst brands. I guess that explains why they
    joined forces eh? Seriously, I have dealth with customer service for BOTH
    companies and their tech support TOTALLY sucked ass. Personally, I think IF
    you are going to buy a name brand, go with Dell. However, I think you are
    better off having a local shop custom build...or better yet, if you know
    what you are doing, build your own.
     
    CLV3, Sep 30, 2005
    #6
  7. Henry

    Robert Baer Guest

    CLV3 wrote:

    > HP and Compaq are two of the worst brands. I guess that explains why they
    > joined forces eh? Seriously, I have dealth with customer service for BOTH
    > companies and their tech support TOTALLY sucked ass. Personally, I think IF
    > you are going to buy a name brand, go with Dell. However, I think you are
    > better off having a local shop custom build...or better yet, if you know
    > what you are doing, build your own.
    >
    >

    One is always better off with a no-brander: co$tS le$$, and *NO*
    proprietary flim-flam.
    Furthermore, you actually *get* the CDs for the OS and all of the
    applications!
     
    Robert Baer, Sep 30, 2005
    #7
  8. Henry

    Fakename Guest

    You don't always get the OS CD's, and it's not always cheaper.

    I think the best thing to do is get a support package from the store you
    purchase the machine from. Obviously this doesn't apply if you buy
    direct from the manufacturer.

    My employer started buying comps from Dell a few months ago, but because
    of the poor service we're going to drop them. Sure, comps from our old
    supplier will cost a little more, but when there's a problem they really
    take care of us. In the end, it's less hassle and frustration just
    dropping Dell. That and there machines come pre-loaded with crapware...




    Robert Baer wrote:
    > CLV3 wrote:
    >
    >> HP and Compaq are two of the worst brands. I guess that explains why they
    >> joined forces eh? Seriously, I have dealth with customer service for BOTH
    >> companies and their tech support TOTALLY sucked ass. Personally, I
    >> think IF
    >> you are going to buy a name brand, go with Dell. However, I think you are
    >> better off having a local shop custom build...or better yet, if you know
    >> what you are doing, build your own.
    >>
    >>

    > One is always better off with a no-brander: co$tS le$$, and *NO*
    > proprietary flim-flam.
    > Furthermore, you actually *get* the CDs for the OS and all of the
    > applications!
     
    Fakename, Oct 1, 2005
    #8
  9. Henry

    Robert Baer Guest

    Fakename wrote:

    > You don't always get the OS CD's, and it's not always cheaper.
    >
    > I think the best thing to do is get a support package from the store you
    > purchase the machine from. Obviously this doesn't apply if you buy
    > direct from the manufacturer.
    >
    > My employer started buying comps from Dell a few months ago, but because
    > of the poor service we're going to drop them. Sure, comps from our old
    > supplier will cost a little more, but when there's a problem they really
    > take care of us. In the end, it's less hassle and frustration just
    > dropping Dell. That and there machines come pre-loaded with crapware...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    >> CLV3 wrote:
    >>
    >>> HP and Compaq are two of the worst brands. I guess that explains why
    >>> they
    >>> joined forces eh? Seriously, I have dealth with customer service for
    >>> BOTH
    >>> companies and their tech support TOTALLY sucked ass. Personally, I
    >>> think IF
    >>> you are going to buy a name brand, go with Dell. However, I think you
    >>> are
    >>> better off having a local shop custom build...or better yet, if you know
    >>> what you are doing, build your own.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> One is always better off with a no-brander: co$tS le$$, and *NO*
    >> proprietary flim-flam.
    >> Furthermore, you actually *get* the CDs for the OS and all of the
    >> applications!

    If you buy the OS, the only way you get it is on a CD...
    And if you shop prudently (on the web), the cost will be competitive
    or lower than what the shop "next door" can offer; that is, if you DIY.
     
    Robert Baer, Oct 1, 2005
    #9
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