Help me understand a cross over cable.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Louis AA, Dec 9, 2003.

  1. Louis AA

    Louis AA Guest

    Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person said I
    need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me to
    understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If I
    connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A & B
    would that make a network? Not taking into consideration setting up the
    software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the mechanical
    solution for a network?
     
    Louis AA, Dec 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. Louis AA

    Harrison Guest

    No. Since the cables are connecting without the benefit of a hub or
    switch, you need a crossover cable. A crossover cable merely maps the
    TX (transmit) and RX (receive) wires to each other from opposing ends.

    Here's the basic layout.
    http://www.perfectdrivers.com/howto/crossover.html

    If you don't have the tools, get someone to make you one or buy one
    ready-made.

    On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 18:15:05 GMT, "Louis AA"
    <> wrote:

    >Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person said I
    >need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me to
    >understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If I
    >connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A & B
    >would that make a network?
    >Not taking into consideration setting up the
    >software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the mechanical
    >solution for a network?
    >
     
    Harrison, Dec 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. Louis AA

    w_tom Guest

    Two wires go to the NID transmitter. Two other wires go to
    the NID receiver. The hub knows this. Therefore those two
    transmitter wires are also the hub's receiver wires. Pins 2
    and 6 are a transmitter in one end and a receiver in the other
    end.

    But if you hook that same wire between two computers, then
    computer 1 NID transmitter connects to computer 2 NID
    transmitter. Computer 1 receiver connects to computer 2
    receiver.

    To connect two computers together, the cable must exchange
    connections - to that computer 1 transmitter connects to
    computer 2 receiver. This is called a cross over cable.

    Louis AA wrote:
    >
    > Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person said I
    > need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me to
    > understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If I
    > connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A & B
    > would that make a network? Not taking into consideration setting up the
    > software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the mechanical
    > solution for a network?
     
    w_tom, Dec 9, 2003
    #3
  4. Louis AA

    ImhoTech Guest

    "Louis AA" <> wrote in message
    news:JioBb.7526$...
    > Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person said

    I
    > need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me to
    > understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If I
    > connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A &

    B
    > would that make a network? Not taking into consideration setting up the
    > software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the mechanical
    > solution for a network?
    >


    You do need the crossover cable. Ethernet uses two pairs of wires, one pair
    to send data on Tx and one pair to receive data on, called Rx. Data sent
    from one computer leaves on the "send" or Tx pair, but has to arrive on the
    "receive" pair on the destination computer. That's why you need a crossover
    cable to connect two computers directly together from nic card to nic card.

    If you use a hub or a switch, the crossover in done internally and you use
    standard ethernet cabling to connect the computers to the hub.
    >
     
    ImhoTech, Dec 9, 2003
    #4
  5. Louis AA

    why? Guest

    On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 18:15:05 GMT, "Louis AA" wrote:

    >Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person said I
    >need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me to
    >understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If I
    >connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A & B


    The Cat5 , rating does not matter so much here. It could be Cat3 up
    to Cat7 . What you are looking for is the signal connection (pin
    function) . Cat 5/5e cables are very easy to find and are cheap..

    Same applies to Ethernet, it can run over different cables and
    connectors.

    So it's really a RJ45 (of whatever Cat value) Crossover cable you
    need.

    It's already been mentioned about TX out of one side is RX into the
    other.

    Here is a nice diagram and what's going on page.
    http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable4.htm
    http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable5.htm

    >would that make a network? Not taking into consideration setting up the


    A crossover cable will only connect 2PCs, if you need more than that
    then it's a hub (or switch) and patch (pin 1-1 , 2-2 upto 8-8)
    cables.

    >software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the mechanical
    >solution for a network?
    >


    Me
     
    why?, Dec 9, 2003
    #5
  6. Louis AA

    Louis AA Guest

    Thanks guys. I have a better understanding now. I was going to wire the two
    together to have the experience of working with a networking but I now
    understand that using an Ethernet cable is termed pier to pier I believe.
    I will move to another subject.

    Suppose I were to use a wireless router and forget getting the internet
    involved in that matter for now.
    The goal is to be at minimum be wireless to the laptop from the desktop. I
    already own the a router, Linksys BEFW11S4. It is designed for broadband
    internet but I can't get any type of broadband, cable nor DSL.
    If I understand it right, I could use the Ethernet connection from the
    Desktop (B) to the Router using one of the four Ethernet plugs. And over
    the wireless part, use radio waves to connect the laptop (A) from the
    Desktop. Does that sound correct so far?

    And if I had to go wireless with the Desktop, I have a wireless PCI card for
    the Desktop so I could eliminate the hard wire (Ethernet cable) and then be
    wireless to both A and B and that is the mechanical part of the networking.
    Is this correct thus far?

    The end goal is to be able to share and write files on each computer.
    Although, in my mind, I rather have the Desktop store the files and allow
    access to the Laptop to read or write to those stored files, thus only
    needing to backup the Desktop. Is that sound reasoning? As you see, I have
    been all over the news accounts looking for a solution on going wireless
    with a dial up modem but for now I will just put that on hold and do this in
    phases or steps as money allows.
    "why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 18:15:05 GMT, "Louis AA" wrote:
    >
    > >Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person

    said I
    > >need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me

    to
    > >understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If

    I
    > >connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A &

    B
    >
    > The Cat5 , rating does not matter so much here. It could be Cat3 up
    > to Cat7 . What you are looking for is the signal connection (pin
    > function) . Cat 5/5e cables are very easy to find and are cheap..
    >
    > Same applies to Ethernet, it can run over different cables and
    > connectors.
    >
    > So it's really a RJ45 (of whatever Cat value) Crossover cable you
    > need.
    >
    > It's already been mentioned about TX out of one side is RX into the
    > other.
    >
    > Here is a nice diagram and what's going on page.
    > http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable4.htm
    > http://www.duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable5.htm
    >
    > >would that make a network? Not taking into consideration setting up the

    >
    > A crossover cable will only connect 2PCs, if you need more than that
    > then it's a hub (or switch) and patch (pin 1-1 , 2-2 upto 8-8)
    > cables.
    >
    > >software to allow networking. In other words, would I have the

    mechanical
    > >solution for a network?
    > >

    >
    > Me
     
    Louis AA, Dec 9, 2003
    #6
  7. Louis AA

    why? Guest

    On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 21:54:44 GMT, "Louis AA" wrote:

    >Thanks guys. I have a better understanding now. I was going to wire the two
    >together to have the experience of working with a networking but I now


    Why 'was going'?

    >understand that using an Ethernet cable is termed pier to pier I believe.


    I think you meant 'peer-to-peer'.

    >I will move to another subject.
    >
    >Suppose I were to use a wireless router and forget getting the internet
    >involved in that matter for now.
    >The goal is to be at minimum be wireless to the laptop from the desktop. I
    >already own the a router, Linksys BEFW11S4. It is designed for broadband
    >internet but I can't get any type of broadband, cable nor DSL.
    >If I understand it right, I could use the Ethernet connection from the
    >Desktop (B) to the Router using one of the four Ethernet plugs. And over


    Yes, it should act just like multiport switch at that point.

    >the wireless part, use radio waves to connect the laptop (A) from the


    Get a WAP, wireless access point which plugs into the Linksys and a
    wireless NIC for the laptop.

    >Desktop. Does that sound correct so far?


    Yes.

    >And if I had to go wireless with the Desktop, I have a wireless PCI card for
    >the Desktop so I could eliminate the hard wire (Ethernet cable) and then be
    >wireless to both A and B and that is the mechanical part of the networking.
    >Is this correct thus far?


    Sounds okay.

    >The end goal is to be able to share and write files on each computer.
    >Although, in my mind, I rather have the Desktop store the files and allow
    >access to the Laptop to read or write to those stored files, thus only
    >needing to backup the Desktop. Is that sound reasoning? As you see, I have


    Yes, it's up to you what you share out and what the permissions are.

    >been all over the news accounts looking for a solution on going wireless
    >with a dial up modem but for now I will just put that on hold and do this in
    >phases or steps as money allows.


    A couple of sites, dealing with networking, file sharing
    Windows Networking,
    http://www.wown.com/
    looks like site has been redesigned, some links are broken.

    Networking, sharing, security.
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/

    Example setups wired / mixed wireless connections.
    www.netgear.com
    Select the router / nic or wireless access point t to see how the
    things fit together. See datasheet and diagram links.

    Example,
    http://www.netgear.com/images/diagrams/MA311_diagram.jpg


    >"why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 18:15:05 GMT, "Louis AA" wrote:
    >>
    >> >Looks as if I need to school myself on the various terms. One person

    >said I
    >> >need a "cross over cable for Ethernet to hard wire a network". Help me

    >to
    >> >understand this. Computer A and B both have an Ethernet connection. If

    >I
    >> >connected an Ethernet cable, cat 5 to each Ethernet port on computers A &

    >B
    >>
    >> The Cat5 , rating does not matter so much here. It could be Cat3 up
    >> to Cat7 . What you are looking for is the signal connection (pin

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Dec 9, 2003
    #7
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