Help Make Microsoft Profitable Again

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, May 19, 2009.

  1. Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, May 19, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Gordon Guest

    On 2009-05-19, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    > Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    ><http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >

    Well it is better/good, so therefore market forces allow a higher price to
    be charged. Which encourages illegal activity
    Gordon, May 19, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:gute71$53q$...
    > Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >



    I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting cheaper
    please.
    I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant past.
    Jack Spratt, May 19, 2009
    #3
  4. On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:

    > "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    > news:gute71$53q$...
    >> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>

    >
    > I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting cheaper
    > please.
    > I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant past.


    Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c) a pint
    - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it - and it was
    delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the wee-small hours of the
    morning.

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 19, 2009
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "Nicolaas Hawkins" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    > <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    > <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >
    >> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >> news:gute71$53q$...
    >>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting cheaper
    >> please.
    >> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant past.

    >
    > Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c) a
    > pint
    > - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it - and it was
    > delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the wee-small hours of the
    > morning.
    >
    > --
    > - Nicolaas



    AND the tunes whistled by the then milkman were of a higher quality!
    Jack Spratt, May 19, 2009
    #5
  6. On Tue, 19 May 2009 20:18:50 +1200, Jack Spratt
    <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    <news:gutq1e$9uk$-september.org>:

    > "Nicolaas Hawkins" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    >> <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    >> <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >>
    >>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >>> news:gute71$53q$...
    >>>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting cheaper
    >>> please.
    >>> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant past.

    >>
    >> Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c) a
    >> pint
    >> - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it - and it was
    >> delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the wee-small hours of the
    >> morning.
    >>
    >> --
    >> - Nicolaas

    >
    > AND the tunes whistled by the then milkman were of a higher quality!


    Oh, Yeah!

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 19, 2009
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    > <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    > <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >
    >> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >> message news:gute71$53q$...
    >>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>

    >>
    >> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting
    >> cheaper please.
    >> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant
    >> past.

    >
    > Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c)
    > a pint - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it
    > - and it was delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the
    > wee-small hours of the morning.


    You got yours in bottles? Luxury!

    When I lived in a smallish town in North Canterbury (1973) we had to put our
    name on our family billy and put it in the milk stand (next to the store).
    The dairy farmer would fill them up after morning milking and we'd pay him
    monthly. 4c a pint I believe. I'd say there were perhaps 50 to 80 billys
    filled on a daily basis. We had two, we'd take an empty clean one for the
    next day's milk when we collected the milk in the morning. It'd soon go off
    in summer in the corrugated iron milk stand so you couldn't leave it too
    long before picking it up.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    ~misfit~, May 19, 2009
    #7
  8. On Tue, 19 May 2009 21:25:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    wrote in <news:guttui$43j$-september.org>:

    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >> On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    >> <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    >> <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >>
    >>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >>> message news:gute71$53q$...
    >>>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting
    >>> cheaper please.
    >>> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant
    >>> past.

    >>
    >> Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c)
    >> a pint - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it
    >> - and it was delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the
    >> wee-small hours of the morning.

    >
    > You got yours in bottles? Luxury!
    >
    > When I lived in a smallish town in North Canterbury (1973) we had to put our
    > name on our family billy and put it in the milk stand (next to the store).
    > The dairy farmer would fill them up after morning milking and we'd pay him
    > monthly. 4c a pint I believe. I'd say there were perhaps 50 to 80 billys
    > filled on a daily basis. We had two, we'd take an empty clean one for the
    > next day's milk when we collected the milk in the morning. It'd soon go off
    > in summer in the corrugated iron milk stand so you couldn't leave it too
    > long before picking it up.
    >
    > Cheers,


    Yup. Been there, done that, too. And met the farmer on his horse and cart
    at the gate and had our billy filled on the spot from a milk can using a
    dipper. And in those days it was REAL milk.

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 19, 2009
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "Nicolaas Hawkins" <> wrote in message
    news:xhlivm1b9rkb$...
    > On Tue, 19 May 2009 21:25:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    > wrote in <news:guttui$43j$-september.org>:
    >
    >> Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    >>> <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    >>> <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >>>
    >>>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >>>> message news:gute71$53q$...
    >>>>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting
    >>>> cheaper please.
    >>>> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant
    >>>> past.
    >>>
    >>> Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c)
    >>> a pint - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it
    >>> - and it was delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the
    >>> wee-small hours of the morning.

    >>
    >> You got yours in bottles? Luxury!
    >>
    >> When I lived in a smallish town in North Canterbury (1973) we had to put
    >> our
    >> name on our family billy and put it in the milk stand (next to the
    >> store).
    >> The dairy farmer would fill them up after morning milking and we'd pay
    >> him
    >> monthly. 4c a pint I believe. I'd say there were perhaps 50 to 80 billys
    >> filled on a daily basis. We had two, we'd take an empty clean one for the
    >> next day's milk when we collected the milk in the morning. It'd soon go
    >> off
    >> in summer in the corrugated iron milk stand so you couldn't leave it too
    >> long before picking it up.
    >>
    >> Cheers,

    >
    > Yup. Been there, done that, too. And met the farmer on his horse and
    > cart
    > at the gate and had our billy filled on the spot from a milk can using a
    > dipper. And in those days it was REAL milk.
    >
    > --
    > - Nicolaas




    Who the hell is Billy and how does he fill a milk bottle at a time!?
    Jack Spratt, May 19, 2009
    #9
  10. In article <guttui$43j$-september.org>, "~misfit~" <> wrote:
    >Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:

    (snip)
    >>> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting
    >>> cheaper please.
    >>> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant
    >>> past.

    >> Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c)
    >> a pint - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it
    >> - and it was delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the
    >> wee-small hours of the morning.

    >You got yours in bottles? Luxury!


    Agreed ... and I still miss them. :)

    As to things that have got cheaper in the last <mumble> years, the obvious
    one is small appliances of all sorts.
    Surprisingly, food (on a real cost basis) is another. The % of your income
    you spend on this is very likely to be considerably less now than it was
    (say) 20 or 50 years ago.
    There are certainly others.
    Bruce Sinclair, May 20, 2009
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    > On Tue, 19 May 2009 21:25:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    > wrote in <news:guttui$43j$-september.org>:
    >
    >> Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 19 May 2009 19:53:43 +1200, Jack Spratt
    >>> <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    >>> <news:gutoia$vs7$-september.org>:
    >>>
    >>>> "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in
    >>>> message news:gute71$53q$...
    >>>>> Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    >>>>> <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting
    >>>> cheaper please.
    >>>> I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant
    >>>> past.
    >>>
    >>> Less than half that. Fourpence ha'penny (4½d) (= a little under 4c)
    >>> a pint - and not so far in the distant past that I can't remember it
    >>> - and it was delivered to your letterbox in glass bottles in the
    >>> wee-small hours of the morning.

    >>
    >> You got yours in bottles? Luxury!
    >>
    >> When I lived in a smallish town in North Canterbury (1973) we had to
    >> put our name on our family billy and put it in the milk stand (next
    >> to the store). The dairy farmer would fill them up after morning
    >> milking and we'd pay him monthly. 4c a pint I believe. I'd say there
    >> were perhaps 50 to 80 billys filled on a daily basis. We had two,
    >> we'd take an empty clean one for the next day's milk when we
    >> collected the milk in the morning. It'd soon go off in summer in the
    >> corrugated iron milk stand so you couldn't leave it too long before
    >> picking it up.

    >
    > Yup. Been there, done that, too. And met the farmer on his horse
    > and cart at the gate and had our billy filled on the spot from a milk
    > can using a dipper. And in those days it was REAL milk.


    Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the old
    metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No horse and cart
    though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns on a trailer.

    We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England where
    milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles and had been
    for as long as anyone could remember.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    ~misfit~, May 20, 2009
    #11
  12. On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    wrote in <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:

    > Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the old
    > metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No horse and cart
    > though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns on a trailer.
    >
    > We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England where
    > milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles and had been
    > for as long as anyone could remember.
    >
    > Cheers,


    Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk commercially for
    a hundred or few years longer that we had in this colonial outpost - so it
    stands to reason(?) that their method of delivery was a bit farther removed
    from squeezing the cow's teat into a bucket (or directly into the cat's
    meowth).

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 20, 2009
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    > On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    > wrote in <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >
    >> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >> on a trailer.
    >>
    >> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England
    >> where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles
    >> and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>

    >
    > Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    > commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    > colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    > delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat into
    > a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).


    But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one? Surely by 1973 they'd have
    had time to export a few people who knew about bottles, and maybe a few milk
    float drivers?
    --
    Shaun.

    "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    ~misfit~, May 20, 2009
    #13
  14. On Wed, 20 May 2009 18:23:04 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    wrote in <news:gv07k9$sbt$-september.org>:

    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >> On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    >> wrote in <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >>
    >>> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >>> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >>> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >>> on a trailer.
    >>>
    >>> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England
    >>> where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles
    >>> and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    >> commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    >> colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    >> delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat into
    >> a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).

    >
    > But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one?


    Not according to our melanin-enhanced co-citizens.

    > Surely by 1973 they'd have had time to export a few people who knew about
    > bottles, and maybe a few milk float drivers?


    I must admit that was a bit later than _I_ was talking about - I was
    referring to the late 1940's - early-to-mid 1950's.


    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 20, 2009
    #14
  15. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:gv07k9$sbt$-september.org...
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >> On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    >> wrote in <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >>
    >>> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >>> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >>> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >>> on a trailer.
    >>>
    >>> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England
    >>> where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles
    >>> and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    >> commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    >> colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    >> delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat into
    >> a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).

    >
    > But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one? Surely by 1973 they'd
    > have had time to export a few people who knew about bottles, and maybe a
    > few milk float drivers?


    Does Ernie still drive the fastest milk cart in the west?
    Jack Spratt, May 20, 2009
    #15
  16. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Party Animal Guest

    Jack Spratt wrote:

    >
    > Does Ernie still drive the fastest milk cart in the west?


    Not since the unfortunate incident with Ted.
    Party Animal, May 20, 2009
    #16
  17. On Wed, 20 May 2009 20:25:02 +1200, Jack Spratt
    <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com> wrote in
    <news:gv0epa$chp$-september.org>:

    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:gv07k9$sbt$-september.org...
    >> Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~ <>
    >>> wrote in <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >>>
    >>>> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >>>> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >>>> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >>>> on a trailer.
    >>>>
    >>>> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from England
    >>>> where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in bottles
    >>>> and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    >>> commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    >>> colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    >>> delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat into
    >>> a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).

    >>
    >> But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one? Surely by 1973 they'd
    >> have had time to export a few people who knew about bottles, and maybe a
    >> few milk float drivers?

    >
    > Does Ernie still drive the fastest milk cart in the west?


    Ask Trigger.

    --
    - Nicolaas
    Nicolaas Hawkins, May 20, 2009
    #17
  18. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Guest

    On May 19, 7:53 pm, "Jack Spratt" <pickledpork@_nospam_gmail.com>
    wrote:
    > "Lawrence D'Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >
    > news:gute71$53q$...
    >
    > > Looks like Microsoft is going to be charging more for Windows 7
    > > <http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=4414>.

    >
    > I'd be happy to know of a list of consumer items that are getting cheaper
    > please.
    > I mean milk was (probably) 10c a pint at some stage in the distant past.


    Cheese, whiteware.....huge deflation right now....

    regards

    Thing
    , May 20, 2009
    #18
  19. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs Jack Spratt wrote:
    > "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    > news:gv07k9$sbt$-september.org...
    >> Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~
    >>> <> wrote in
    >>> <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >>>> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >>>> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >>>> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >>>> on a trailer.
    >>>>
    >>>> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from
    >>>> England where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in
    >>>> bottles and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    >>> commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    >>> colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    >>> delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat
    >>> into a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).

    >>
    >> But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one? Surely by 1973
    >> they'd have had time to export a few people who knew about bottles,
    >> and maybe a few milk float drivers?

    >
    > Does Ernie still drive the fastest milk cart in the west?


    Man, that brings back memories. Benny Hill?
    --
    Shaun.

    "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    ~misfit~, May 20, 2009
    #19
  20. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Jack Spratt Guest

    "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    news:gv21j6$h0h$-september.org...
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs Jack Spratt wrote:
    >> "~misfit~" <> wrote in message
    >> news:gv07k9$sbt$-september.org...
    >>> Somewhere on teh intarwebs Nicolaas Hawkins wrote:
    >>>> On Wed, 20 May 2009 12:47:37 +1200, ~misfit~
    >>>> <> wrote in
    >>>> <news:guvjv9$1jf$-september.org>:
    >>>>> Yeah, the dairy farmer who supplied the town/villiage milk used the
    >>>>> old metal milk churns and a dipper, and of course real milk. No
    >>>>> horse and cart though, an old Lanz Bulldog tractor with the churns
    >>>>> on a trailer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We wondered what we'd walked into, having just migrated from
    >>>>> England where milk was delivered, even in the smallest hamlets, in
    >>>>> bottles and had been for as long as anyone could remember.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Remember, though, that the Pomgolians had been farming milk
    >>>> commercially for a hundred or few years longer that we had in this
    >>>> colonial outpost - so it stands to reason(?) that their method of
    >>>> delivery was a bit farther removed from squeezing the cow's teat
    >>>> into a bucket (or directly into the cat's meowth).
    >>>
    >>> But isn't this colonial outpost a Pomgolian one? Surely by 1973
    >>> they'd have had time to export a few people who knew about bottles,
    >>> and maybe a few milk float drivers?

    >>
    >> Does Ernie still drive the fastest milk cart in the west?

    >
    > Man, that brings back memories. Benny Hill?


    Yep

    > --
    > Shaun.
    >
    > "Build a man a fire, and he`ll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and
    > he`ll be warm for the rest of his life." Terry Pratchett, Jingo.
    >
    Jack Spratt, May 21, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

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