Help!!! Image sizes.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Petaman, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. Petaman

    Petaman Guest

    Hi,

    I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    and bottom.
    Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.


    Many Thanks

    Andrew
    Petaman, Dec 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. Petaman

    Celcius Guest

    "Petaman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    Hi Andrew!
    In my opinion, you should crop yourself every photo you want printed.
    The number of pixels (width and height) are such that you will never get a
    complete 4x6, 5x7 or 8x10. Some of the picture will be left off. By cropping
    the photos yourself, you can ensure some control over what's to be left off.
    If you use such programs as Photoshop, Photo Elements or other, they will
    let you crop a"standard" width and height. Thus, the photos you send to be
    printed are already trimmed in standard size.
    Take care,
    Marcel
    Celcius, Dec 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. Petaman

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Petaman wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.


    Your camera produces a ratio of 4:3 and a 6x4 photo has a ratio of 3:2

    4:3 is taller than 3:2 and that is why you're missing some from the top
    and bottom.

    Leave the image width the same and crop 235 vertical pixels. That will
    get them to the right ratio... (2816 X 1877)
    Jim Townsend, Dec 31, 2006
    #3
  4. Petaman

    Bates Guest

    On Dec 31, 11:40 am, "Petaman" <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew


    Hi Andrew,

    Well, this may be obvious, but a 6x4 (4x6) print is a 1.5:1 ratio,
    whereas you image is a 1.33:1 ratio, thus, there will have to be some
    cropping involved. The issue is you picture is wider than the ultimate
    print will be. Now, a 5x7 print is 1.4:1 and will be closer to what
    you want, but will still incur some cropping. If you want to ensure
    that you images are cropped in the way you want them to be, you will
    need to crop them yourself.

    For a 6x4 you will need the image to be 2816x1877 and for a 7x5 you
    will need it to be 2816x2011.

    Bates....
    Bates, Dec 31, 2006
    #4
  5. Petaman

    Roy G Guest

    "Petaman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew


    Your Digital camera, like most others, takes a picture which, when it is 6
    inches wide is 4 and a half inches tall.

    So if you want a 6 x 4 print, half an inch needs cropped off the narrow
    side.

    Just remember to allow some extra space to ensure bits of people don't get
    chopped by the auto machines.

    Check your pixel sizes and you will find they are in the proportion of 4 x
    3. Paper sizes are not in the same proportions.
    Roy G, Dec 31, 2006
    #5
  6. Petaman

    Bates Guest

    On Dec 31, 11:40 am, "Petaman" <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew


    Hi Andrew,

    Well, this may be obvious, but a 6x4 (4x6) print is a 1.5:1 ratio,
    whereas you image is a 1.33:1 ratio, thus, there will have to be some
    cropping involved. The issue is you picture is wider than the ultimate
    print will be. Now, a 5x7 print is 1.4:1 and will be closer to what
    you want, but will still incur some cropping. If you want to ensure
    that you images are cropped in the way you want them to be, you will
    need to crop them yourself.

    For a 6x4 you will need the image to be 2816x1877 and for a 7x5 you
    will need it to be 2816x2011.

    Bates....
    Bates, Dec 31, 2006
    #6
  7. Petaman

    Cgiorgio Guest

    Hmm.. here they usually give you a choice if you want the paper filled and
    your image cropped or if you want white boarders that you can trim later.

    "Petaman" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    Cgiorgio, Dec 31, 2006
    #7
  8. Petaman

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Petaman wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >


    Pretty normal.

    Images are 4:3 (12:9) and prints are 3:2 (12:8),
    meaning you lose some vertically. Best is to crop
    them yourself in a computer before having them
    printed. That way you will get what you expect.

    Phil
    Phil Wheeler, Dec 31, 2006
    #8
  9. Petaman

    ray Guest

    On Sun, 31 Dec 2006 08:40:36 -0800, Petaman wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew


    6x4 is, quite obviously, a 3:2 aspect ratio. Most digital cameras, by
    default, do 4:3. Some of them will have a setting to do 3:2 (my Kodak P850
    does). 2816x1877 should work for you.
    ray, Dec 31, 2006
    #9
  10. In article <45981ca3$0$20024$> Phil Wheeler <> writes:
    $Petaman wrote:
    $> I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    [...]
    $> Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio

    You just cited the ratio above: 6x4 is a 3:2 ratio.

    $Images are 4:3 (12:9) and prints are 3:2 (12:8)

    Just to make this more general ... those numbers are true for the
    original poster's specific camera and specific print size. In general,
    most DSLRs are 3:2 (except for those using the four-thirds system) and
    most other digital cameras are 4:3. Many digital cameras allow the
    user to pick from a variety of image sizes, and while in the past the
    sizes offered by a given camera are all in the same ratio, there are
    some cameras now that allow the user to choose image sizes of *different*
    ratios, such as 4:3, 3:2, or even 16:9 (the ratio of widescreen TV).
    Check the manual for your camera to find out what it offers; if it
    doesn't give you the ratio, a calculator will tell you.

    4x6" is the most common standard print size in this part of the world;
    I don't know if it is elsewhere. But other standard print sizes are
    not necessarily in the same ratio: 4x6, 5x7, and 8x10 are all common
    print sizes, and all have different ratios. So if you really like
    that 4x6 and want it printed as an 8x10, you have to keep in mind that
    it will end up cropped. (Some printers will do 8x12, which is the same
    ratio as 4x6, and which solves that problem, but then you have to find
    a frame for an 8x12, and that's not a standard frame size - 8x10 is.)

    $ Best is to crop
    $them yourself in a computer before having them
    $printed. That way you will get what you expect.

    Agreed.

    One other thing to keep in mind is that even if you provide them
    with a file that's exactly in the right ratio, you're still probably
    going to lose some pixels off each side. Most printing machines do
    this, for a couple of reasons. One is that there is some mechanical
    slop within the machine; not everything is perfectly aligned. If
    they printed your picture at exactly 4x6", chances are pretty good
    that some of your pictures would end up with a bit of white space on
    one side, or perhaps a sliver of the next/previous photo on one side.
    So printing machines are typically designed to print the picture
    slightly larger than it ought to be, on paper that's the right size,
    leading to slight cropping.

    The other is mostly historical: most film SLRs display slightly
    less than 100% of the image in the viewfinder, and most non-SLRs
    with optical viewfinders (e.g. rangefinders or point and shoots, and
    that includes digital P&Ses which provide optical viewfinders)
    have the potential for parallax. So what you saw through the viewfinder
    is not precisely what ends up being captured when you take the picture;
    some other stuff that you thought was outside the field of view may
    actually be within the image. If the printer crops the edges off the
    frame when printing, it reduces the chances of this being a problem.
    --
    Stephen M. Dunn <>
    >>>----------------> http://www.stevedunn.ca/ <----------------<<<

    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Say hi to my cat -- http://www.stevedunn.ca/photos/toby/
    Stephen M. Dunn, Dec 31, 2006
    #10
  11. Petaman

    MurrayW Guest

    As others have mentioned you will need to do constrained cropping to a
    specific size. After using many freeware programs I did not find any
    that could do this but then again, maybe there was a technique I was
    unaware of how to use. Because of that, I did some searching for other
    programs. I obtained Photoshop Elements 2 but did not care all that
    much for it.

    Having learned about the Microsoft Digital Image Pro imaging software,
    I did a trial of their DIP 10 and then checked around EBay for a full
    version of it. Because the new version DIP 2006 is available with a 60
    day trial, the previous version is very in expensive on EBay. I'd
    expect the 2006 version to be available there also. DIP 10 is a very
    nice and quite easy to use program. Perhaps not quite as powerful as
    PSE 5 but maybe more user friendly. Check it out and do Custom cropping
    and select from a list the size and shape you want, drag the mouse and
    place the shape over the original to create the best image you can via
    the constraints of the format selected.

    MW


    Petaman wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew
    MurrayW, Dec 31, 2006
    #11
  12. Petaman

    David Azose Guest

    Petaman wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > and bottom.
    > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >
    >
    > Many Thanks
    >
    > Andrew
    >

    The shape of your file is different from the shape of the paper. So
    cropping is inevitable.

    David A.
    David Azose, Jan 2, 2007
    #12
  13. Petaman

    Justin C Guest

    In article <>,
    David Azose <> wrote:

    > Petaman wrote:
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    > > maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    > > cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    > > and bottom.
    > > Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    > > (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    > > that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    > > The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    > >
    > >
    > > Many Thanks
    > >
    > > Andrew
    > >

    > The shape of your file is different from the shape of the paper. So
    > cropping is inevitable.


    It's not inevitable. The printer could offer the option of full image
    print leaving a border (at the sides in this case) to be trimmed.

    --
    Justin C, by the sea.
    Justin C, Jan 2, 2007
    #13
  14. Petaman

    David Azose Guest

    Justin C wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > David Azose <> wrote:
    >
    >> Petaman wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I recently ordered some 6x4 prints from Jessops' in-store digital photo
    >>> maker. When I received the prints I noticed that they had all been
    >>> cropped in such a way that some of the image was missing from the top
    >>> and bottom.
    >>> Therefore can you please advise me as to the best height to width ratio
    >>> (i.e. when the width is x the height should be y) for images to be so
    >>> that when they are printed in 6x4 they are not cropped?
    >>> The original image from the camera is 2816x2112 pixels.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Many Thanks
    >>>
    >>> Andrew
    >>>

    >> The shape of your file is different from the shape of the paper. So
    >> cropping is inevitable.

    >
    > It's not inevitable. The printer could offer the option of full image
    > print leaving a border (at the sides in this case) to be trimmed.
    >

    Good point. I should have added "...if you want to fill the paper or
    have equal borders."
    David Azose, Jan 2, 2007
    #14
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