Help ..I cant seem to get Metering right

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Deepak, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Deepak

    Deepak Guest

    All,

    I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and pleasing
    exposures especially in high contrast scenes.I use the built in meter
    on the Canon 20D.

    For eg:If I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill the
    tree in shadows.I do understand that we need to correctly meter against
    these.I am able shoot different exposures and 'blend' them in
    photoshop.BUT its tough for me to beleive that is the only way to do
    that.

    Can I walk away with a very evenly exposed Landscape shot 'in the
    camera' ?

    Having to take multiple exposures entails having your tripod with
    you.There are time when I 'dont' have it with me and multiple
    exposures+blending would not work isnt it?

    I am wondering how you guys deal with this.I realise this is among the
    first hurdled most photographers deal with.It would great to know how
    you guys get there evntually

    BTW I do understand the role of aperture+shutter speed+ISO and their
    interdependancies in the context of landscape photography.What I am
    really looking for is clues for metering correctly.


    Thanks

    Deepak
     
    Deepak, Aug 9, 2005
    #1
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  2. Deepak wrote:
    > All,
    >
    > I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and pleasing
    > exposures especially in high contrast scenes.I use the built in meter
    > on the Canon 20D.
    >
    > For eg:If I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    > with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill the
    > tree in shadows.I do understand that we need to correctly meter
    > against these.I am able shoot different exposures and 'blend' them in
    > photoshop.BUT its tough for me to beleive that is the only way to do
    > that.
    >
    > Can I walk away with a very evenly exposed Landscape shot 'in the
    > camera' ?
    >
    > Having to take multiple exposures entails having your tripod with
    > you.There are time when I 'dont' have it with me and multiple
    > exposures+blending would not work isnt it?
    >
    > I am wondering how you guys deal with this.I realise this is among the
    > first hurdled most photographers deal with.It would great to know how
    > you guys get there evntually
    >
    > BTW I do understand the role of aperture+shutter speed+ISO and their
    > interdependancies in the context of landscape photography.What I am
    > really looking for is clues for metering correctly.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Deepak


    For starts you may want to try playing with RAW to see what happens.
    Also shoot some bracketed exposures. Try a variety of exposure techniques
    with each of the above and see how those results work for you.

    I don't believe there is any one answer for all people. Photography is
    90% art and 10% science.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 9, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. The advise about shooting RAW is good. The problem is more than just
    metering. It may not be possible to get the extremes of a high contrast
    scene to fit within the range of the camera. RAW gives you a bit more
    range...but even then it may not be enough. If you don't have your tripod
    you can set up your camera to shoot a burst of bracketed shots and if you
    are lucky they will line up.

    --
    Thanks,
    Gene Palmiter
    (visit my photo gallery at http://palmiter.dotphoto.com)
    freebridge design group
    www.route611.com & Route 611 Magazine
    "Deepak" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > All,
    >
    > I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and pleasing
    > exposures especially in high contrast scenes.I use the built in meter
    > on the Canon 20D.
    >
    > For eg:If I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    > with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill the
    > tree in shadows.I do understand that we need to correctly meter against
    > these.I am able shoot different exposures and 'blend' them in
    > photoshop.BUT its tough for me to beleive that is the only way to do
    > that.
    >
    > Can I walk away with a very evenly exposed Landscape shot 'in the
    > camera' ?
    >
    > Having to take multiple exposures entails having your tripod with
    > you.There are time when I 'dont' have it with me and multiple
    > exposures+blending would not work isnt it?
    >
    > I am wondering how you guys deal with this.I realise this is among the
    > first hurdled most photographers deal with.It would great to know how
    > you guys get there evntually
    >
    > BTW I do understand the role of aperture+shutter speed+ISO and their
    > interdependancies in the context of landscape photography.What I am
    > really looking for is clues for metering correctly.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Deepak
    >
     
    Gene Palmiter, Aug 9, 2005
    #3
  4. Deepak

    Bill Hilton Guest

    > Deepak writes ...
    >
    >I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and
    >pleasing exposures especially in high contrast scenes


    It's tough because of the high contrast ...

    >I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    >with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill
    >the tree in shadows.


    With slide film I'd spot meter on the clouds, open up say 1.5 - 2 stops
    and let the shadows fall where they fall. With digital there are some
    tricks you can try ... these three 'tutorials' should be of help ... if
    the links wrap around and are broken go to
    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/ and look at the bottom of the page
    for these links ...

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/understandexposure.shtml

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/u-contrast-masking.shtml

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/digital-blending.shtml

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Aug 9, 2005
    #4
  5. Deepak

    wilt Guest

    Using tools like Photoshop, you can selectively alter brightness and
    contrast of areas of the photo as well. So you do not necessarily have
    to take multiple exposures.

    --Wilt
     
    wilt, Aug 9, 2005
    #5
  6. Deepak

    Mike Rooney Guest

    Deepak, I'm not aware of any camera meter that will handle the difference
    between the brightness of the sky and most landscape foregrounds very
    well.....the amount of light from the sky is much more than the reflective
    light from the foreground. You can confirm this yourself -- meter just the
    foreground and then meter just the sky -- except in the early morning or
    late evening, there will be 2 stops or more of difference. You can do a
    couple of things:

    1) Use a graduated neutral density filter -- the basic ones come in
    1,2, and 3 stop graduations. For the 20D, I'd recommend the 3 stop. There
    are many companies that make them and most of us pros use the Conkin type
    filter holder......go to your local photo professional shop and they'll
    explain further but, basically, the top part of the filter lets in 3 stops
    less light than the clear part. You merely position the filter in the
    holder to cover the sky. Meter the foreground (don't include the sky) and
    then position the filter to cover the sky. Takes some practice.

    2) Another very very useful filter is a polarizing filter.......it's
    maximum polarization occurs at 90 degrees to the sun and reduces glare (and
    darkens skies). You can over polarize so, again, practice.....there are
    many articles on the net and in photo magazines about the varied uses of
    polarizers.....

    Hope this helps.

    Know this is brief
    "Deepak" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > All,
    >
    > I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and pleasing
    > exposures especially in high contrast scenes.I use the built in meter
    > on the Canon 20D.
    >
    > For eg:If I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    > with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill the
    > tree in shadows.I do understand that we need to correctly meter against
    > these.I am able shoot different exposures and 'blend' them in
    > photoshop.BUT its tough for me to beleive that is the only way to do
    > that.
    >
    > Can I walk away with a very evenly exposed Landscape shot 'in the
    > camera' ?
    >
    > Having to take multiple exposures entails having your tripod with
    > you.There are time when I 'dont' have it with me and multiple
    > exposures+blending would not work isnt it?
    >
    > I am wondering how you guys deal with this.I realise this is among the
    > first hurdled most photographers deal with.It would great to know how
    > you guys get there evntually
    >
    > BTW I do understand the role of aperture+shutter speed+ISO and their
    > interdependancies in the context of landscape photography.What I am
    > really looking for is clues for metering correctly.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Deepak
    >
     
    Mike Rooney, Aug 9, 2005
    #6
  7. Deepak

    Don Guest

    Deepak

    Log onto Arthur Morris's Birds as Art Site and buy his book "the art of bird
    photography". Chapters 3 & 4 have some of the best explanations and "how
    to" that I have read on exposure etc. If you don't photograph birds, give
    the book away as a gift (after reading the chapters). The material applies
    to all areas of photography except perhaps flash.

    regards

    Don
    "Deepak" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > All,
    >
    > I have for a quite sometime struggled to get correct and pleasing
    > exposures especially in high contrast scenes.I use the built in meter
    > on the Canon 20D.
    >
    > For eg:If I am shooting a landscape which includes a bright blue sky
    > with clouds,a foreground (tree),I either blow up the sky or kill the
    > tree in shadows.I do understand that we need to correctly meter against
    > these.I am able shoot different exposures and 'blend' them in
    > photoshop.BUT its tough for me to beleive that is the only way to do
    > that.
    >
    > Can I walk away with a very evenly exposed Landscape shot 'in the
    > camera' ?
    >
    > Having to take multiple exposures entails having your tripod with
    > you.There are time when I 'dont' have it with me and multiple
    > exposures+blending would not work isnt it?
    >
    > I am wondering how you guys deal with this.I realise this is among the
    > first hurdled most photographers deal with.It would great to know how
    > you guys get there evntually
    >
    > BTW I do understand the role of aperture+shutter speed+ISO and their
    > interdependancies in the context of landscape photography.What I am
    > really looking for is clues for metering correctly.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Deepak
    >
     
    Don, Aug 10, 2005
    #7
  8. Deepak

    Craig Dunn Guest

    You may also find it helpful to play with the reading settings on the
    camera. Try similar shots using spot and center weighted metering
    instead of the default and see if that produces more accurate readings
    for what you're trying to shoot.
     
    Craig Dunn, Aug 10, 2005
    #8
  9. Here's a link to the raw challenge thread - you can see some examples
    of what people did with an image that definately fits in to the high
    contrast category.

    Here's the thread link (the first message links to the file)
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....4f1536655c1/b54a78ee9c0ecd5d#b54a78ee9c0ecd5d

    Here is where a lot of the example images are:
    http://foto-ceif.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=45

    Here is where one of the guys posted all the images from the thread
    together (I'm not sure which ones are also on the previous link).
    http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/raw-challenge&PG=1&PIC=1

    Hope this provides some more information!

    Brian
     
    Brian Chapman, Aug 10, 2005
    #9
  10. Deepak

    Brian Guest

    Here's a link to the raw challenge thread - you can see some examples
    of what people did with an image that definately fits in to the high
    contrast category.

    Here's the thread link (the first message links to the file)
    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....4f1536655c1/b54a78ee9c0ecd5d#b54a78ee9c0ecd5d

    Here is where a lot of the example images are:
    http://foto-ceif.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=45

    Here is where one of the guys posted all the images from the thread
    together (I'm not sure which ones are also on the previous link).
    http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/raw-challenge&PG=1&PIC=1

    Hope this provides some more information!

    Brian
     
    Brian, Aug 10, 2005
    #10
  11. Deepak

    Deepak Guest

    All,

    Thanks a lot for those valuable tips.It sure looks like there is no
    'one size fits all' thingy here.Which I dont really complain about.I
    should admit I have already got a hang of it after having a look at
    this discussion.Though I knew about how PS can be of help (and I do
    intend to get better with it - Thanks Brian for the links).I did some
    more reading through all the links that you guys pointed me to.Apart
    from the very useful -luminous-landscape/fredmiranda/etc write ups,I
    found the following links also which gave me some clues

    http://www.spotmetering.com/spc20d/20dtech.htm

    I am planning on a quick trip to a photo store this weekend to check on
    ND Filters.This brings me to the next question


    I live in London and would really appreciate any references to 'good'
    photography equipment shops with knowledgeable people behind the
    counters.
    I have been to many shops on the street at the end of Bond St/Oxford St
    (dont quite remember the name),but found these guys to be basically
    selling everything else under the sun 'including ' cameras and they
    appeared more keen on making the right salesmen sounds.I did not think
    any of those stores were well stocked on lenses/accessories either.

    Once again thanks for your help on this

    Cheers
    Deepak
     
    Deepak, Aug 11, 2005
    #11
  12. Deepak

    Craig Dunn Guest

    Jacobs on Oxford Street are pretty good and cluefull, failing that,
    theres a Jessops across the road from them.
     
    Craig Dunn, Aug 11, 2005
    #12
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